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In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, tourists ride classic convertible cars on the Malecon beside the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Cuba. The Biden administration faces increasing pressure to respond to a sharply growing number of reported injuries suffered by diplomats, intelligence officers and military personnel that some suspect are caused by devices that emit waves of energy that disrupt brain function. The problem has been labeled the “Havana Syndrome,” because the first cases affected personnel in 2016 at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan, File)

In this Oct. 3, 2017, file photo, tourists ride classic convertible cars on the Malecon beside the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Cuba. The Biden administration faces increasing pressure to respond to a sharply growing number of reported injuries suffered by diplomats, intelligence officers and military personnel that some suspect are caused by devices that emit waves of energy that disrupt brain function. The problem has been labeled the “Havana Syndrome,” because the first cases affected personnel in 2016 at the U.S. Embassy in Cuba. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan, File)

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