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Faith and Family

Stay up to date on the latest news and discussions on religion, faith and family.

Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Chicago Archbishop, right, takes his seat with Mons. Charles Scicluna, Malta Archbishop, and the Rev. Hans Zollner, left, ahead of a press conference on a Vatican summit on preventing clergy sex abuse, at the Vatican, Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. Organizers of Pope Francis' summit on preventing clergy sex abuse will meet this week with a dozen survivor-activists who have come to Rome to protest the Catholic Church's response to date and demand an end to decades of cover-up by church leaders. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Catholics sex abuse summit sidesteps role of gay priests

By Christopher Vondracek - The Washington Times

Some conservative U.S. Catholics are dismayed by the official schedule for Pope Francis' Vatican summit with bishops on clerical sex abuse that begins Thursday, saying it ignores the root cause of the scandal: gays in the priesthood. Published February 20, 2019

Ukrainian soldiers drive APCs near Urzuf, south coast of Azov sea, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Ukraine put its military forces on high combat alert and announced martial law this week after Russian border guards fired on and seized three Ukrainian ships in the Black Sea. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

Ukraine bars entry to Russian males, upping ante in conflict

By Yuras Karmanau and Nataliya Vasilyeva - Associated Press

Ukrainian officials on Friday upped the ante in the growing confrontation with Russia, announcing a travel ban for most Russian males and searching the home of an influential cleric of the Russian Orthodox Church. Published November 30, 2018

Recent Stories

In this Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019, file photo, a salesman at a vape shop exhales while using an e-cigarette in Maine. On Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 530 confirmed and probable cases have been reported from 38 states and one U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Feds launch criminal investigation of vaping industry

- The Washington Times

Federal officials on Thursday announced they are directing criminal investigators to investigate the largely unregulated electronic cigarette industry, beefing up efforts to confront a public health crisis amid a growing number of illnesses and deaths linked to vaping.

Feds cite Islam focus in review of Duke-UNC language grant

- Associated Press

The Trump administration is threatening to cut funding for a Middle East studies program run by the University of North Carolina and Duke University, arguing that it's misusing a federal grant to advance "ideological priorities" and unfairly promote "the positive aspects of Islam" but not Christianity or Judaism.

Liberty students protest in wake of reports about Jerry Falwell Jr.

- Associated Press

Students at Liberty University in Virginia gathered Friday to protest in the wake of news reports containing allegations that school president Jerry Falwell Jr. improperly benefited from the institution and disparaged students in emails.

In this Jan. 15, 2018, file photo, Pope Francis holds a photo of U.S. photographer Joseph Roger O'Donnell of child victims of Nagasaki bombing, aboard his flight to Santiago, Chile. The Vatican said Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, Pope Francis will visit Thailand and Japan on Nov. 19-26. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, File)

Pope Francis to visit Thailand, Japan in November

- Associated Press

Pope Francis will visit Thailand and Japan in November in a visit expected to highlight his call for complete nuclear disarmament and honor the small Catholic communities in each country.

Shiite Muslims gather outside the golden-domed shrine of Imam Moussa al-Kadhim during a Muharram procession in Baghdad, Iraq, Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar, is a month of mourning for Shiites in remembrance of the death of Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, at the Battle of Karbala in present-day Iraq in the 7th century. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

31 Iraqi pilgrims die in stampede during Ashoura

- Associated Press

Part of a walkway collapsed as tens of thousands of people celebrated Ashoura on Tuesday, causing a stampede and killing at least 31 pilgrims on one of the most sacred religious holy days for the Shiite sect, officials said.

Schools face backlash for not reporting gun threats to parents

- Associated Press

When officials at a Catholic high school in South Carolina learned that a 16-year-old student made videos of himself firing a gun and using racial slurs, they alerted police, but not parents. After the videos made it into the news over the summer, the backlash came quickly.

This May 17, 2018 file photo shows packs of menthol cigarettes and other tobacco products at a store in San Francisco.  (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu) **FILE**

Wisconsin bill would set age at 21 to buy tobacco, nicotine

- Associated Press

A bipartisan group of Wisconsin lawmakers wants to raise the minimum age for buying tobacco and nicotine products, including vaping products, saying it's currently too easy for young high school students to get them and that the products are contributing to a public health crisis.

Misty Dotson hugs her son's at their home Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2019, in Murray, Utah. Dotson is a 33-year-old single mother of two boys, ages 12 and 6, who goes to Planned Parenthood for care through the Title X program. Dotson is among the 39,000 people received treatment from Planned Parenthood of Utah in 2018 under a federal family planning program called Title X. The organization this week announced it is pulling out program rather than abide by a new Trump administration rule prohibiting clinics from referring women for abortions. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Planned Parenthood sees swift fallout from quitting program

- Associated Press

Planned Parenthood clinics in several states are charging new fees, tapping into financial reserves, intensifying fundraising and warning of more unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases in the wake of its decision to quit a $260 million federal family planning program in a dispute with the Trump administration over abortion.

Recent Opinion Columns

In this image from video provided by Senate TV, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine., speaks on the Senate floor about her vote on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kananaugh, Friday, Oct. 5, 2018 in the Capitol in Washington.  Sen Shelly Capito, R-W.Va., sits rear left and Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., sits right.  (Senate TV via AP)

Susan Collins' finest hour

In a speech announcing her vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican, reminded me of some of the great orators of the past. Her speech was measured in tone, substantive in content and delivered with conviction.

Religious Oppression in China Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the Chinese government stifles religious faith

Several years ago during a visit to the United States, President Xi Jinping was interviewed by a Chinese national living in the United States. After the interview, Mr. Xi asked a single question of this reporter — not about his family, not about his studies, not about whether he enjoyed living in America — the one question he asked was "Why do so many Chinese students studying in the United States become Christians?"

Illustration on the continued need for impartial justice by ALexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Lady Justice must be blind

George Barna, in his book "What Americans Believe," points out that 87 percent of non-Christians and 77 percent of self-described born-again Christians agreed with the statement "People are basically good." Our culture by and large has discarded the idea of original sin.

Illustration on the attractiveness of Socialism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unthinking and the unobservant

This past week, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a self-proclaimed socialist, won the Democratic primary for a congressional seat in New York. Why would a sane person advocate a political movement that was responsible for well over a hundred million deaths in the last century, as well as untold misery? By her comments, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez revealed a couple of things about herself. The first is an ignorance of history — because it is unlikely that she really meant to be an advocate for a cause that often results in mass death and destruction — and that she is unable to think beyond stage 1, or the first order effect of a policy.

Illustration on anti-Christian bias by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting all Americans from anti-religious hostility

Seven justices of the U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission was unconstitutionally biased against the religious beliefs of Jack Phillips, the owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop.

From The Vault

This Oct. 1, 2017, file photo shows Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington shaking hands with churchgoers at St. Mathews Cathedral after the Red Mass in Washington. Wuerl is defending himself ahead of a forthcoming grand jury report investigating child sexual abuse in six of Pennsylvania's Roman Catholic dioceses. He says the report will be critical of some of his actions as Pittsburgh's bishop. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Pennsylvania report identifies more than 1,000 children molested by priests

- Associated Press

More than 1,000 children -- and possible many more -- were molested by hundreds of Roman Catholic priests in six Pennsylvania dioceses, while senior church officials took steps to cover it up, according to a landmark grand jury report released Tuesday.

A woman holds her hands in prayer as she watches Pope Francis on a  monitor as people await his arrival on Sept. 26, 2015, in Philadelphia. (Associated Press)

God still the co-pilot: U.S. remains the most religious among all Western nations

- The Washington Times

It is fashionable in some circles to purge the presence of God from everyday life, whether it's by banning religious images or language in public places, or media coverage that implies that faith-based anything is not inclusive. Such thinking is not new. In 1966, Time Magazine published an edition titled "Is God Dead?" -- suggesting that the faith was wavering, and the U.S. was on a path to secularization.

The White House is seen at dusk in Washington on Nov. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Trump hosts first Iftar dinner in observance of Ramadan

- The Washington Times

President Trump is hosting his first Iftar dinner Wednesday night at the White House to mark one of the religious observances of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, a gesture that was met with surprise and criticism among some U.S. Muslims.

First lady Melania Trump speaks on her initiatives during an event in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, May 7, 2018, in Washington.  The first lady gave her multipronged effort to promote the well-being of children a minimalist new motto: "BE BEST."  The first lady formally launched her long-awaited initiative after more than a year of reading to children, learning about babies born addicted to drugs and hosting a White House conversation on cyberbullying.   (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Melania Trump unveils 'Be Best' agenda to promote children's well-being

- The Washington Times

First lady Melania Trump rolled out an agenda Monday that focused on enhancing the well-being of children, soldiering on in her duties against one of the Washington press corps' most hostile receptions for a first lady and rabid news coverage of the president's alleged infidelity with adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

In this photo taken Thursday, Aug. 14, 2013, an embryologist works on a petri dish at the Create Health fertility clinic in south London. Since the first test-tube baby was born more than three decades ago, in vitro fertilization has become a sophisticated process with pricey incubators, specialized techniques and extensive screening. Now, scientists are going back to basics and testing a simpler and cheaper method intended mainly for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) ** FILE **

More than 71,000 babies born in 2016 from IVF

- The Washington Times

Babies born using assisted reproductive technology increased in 2016, with 71,296 births counted from the efforts of 377 clinics in the U.S., according to preliminary data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.