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Faith and Family

Stay up to date on the latest news and discussions on religion, faith and family.

Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Chicago Archbishop, right, takes his seat with Mons. Charles Scicluna, Malta Archbishop, and the Rev. Hans Zollner, left, ahead of a press conference on a Vatican summit on preventing clergy sex abuse, at the Vatican, Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. Organizers of Pope Francis' summit on preventing clergy sex abuse will meet this week with a dozen survivor-activists who have come to Rome to protest the Catholic Church's response to date and demand an end to decades of cover-up by church leaders. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Catholics sex abuse summit sidesteps role of gay priests

By Christopher Vondracek - The Washington Times

Some conservative U.S. Catholics are dismayed by the official schedule for Pope Francis' Vatican summit with bishops on clerical sex abuse that begins Thursday, saying it ignores the root cause of the scandal: gays in the priesthood. Published February 20, 2019

Ukrainian soldiers drive APCs near Urzuf, south coast of Azov sea, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Ukraine put its military forces on high combat alert and announced martial law this week after Russian border guards fired on and seized three Ukrainian ships in the Black Sea. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

Ukraine bars entry to Russian males, upping ante in conflict

By Yuras Karmanau and Nataliya Vasilyeva - Associated Press

Ukrainian officials on Friday upped the ante in the growing confrontation with Russia, announcing a travel ban for most Russian males and searching the home of an influential cleric of the Russian Orthodox Church. Published November 30, 2018

Recent Stories

In this Aug. 9, 2019, photo Ron Sattler kneels and prays in front of the altar in Canton, Ohio. Late in the summer of 1939, crowds of strangers started showing up at Rhoda Wises house next to a city dump in Ohio after she let it be known that miracles were occurring in her room. Eight decades later, people still make pilgrimages to the wood frame bungalow at the edge of Canton, seeking their own miracles. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Ohio 'miracle house' draws pilgrims amid sainthood push

- Associated Press

Late in the summer of 1939, crowds of strangers started showing up at Rhoda Wise's house next to a city dump in Ohio after she let it be known that miracles were occurring in her room.

This Aug. 4, 2015, file photo, flowers bloom in front of the Salt Lake Temple, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is reminding members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by a competent doctor. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Mormon church warning: Beware of those fancy coffee drinks

- Associated Press

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has issued a warning to members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by "competent" doctors.

In this Feb. 13, 2017, file photo, tourists point at the Treasury, in the kingdom's Petra archaeological park, southern Jordan. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil, File)

Jordan halts film that refers to historical Jewish presence

- Associated Press

A fictional caper about an antiquities heist set in an ancient Jordanian city has stirred widespread outrage over the film's portrayal of historical Jewish ties to Jordan, shining a light on the tenuous peace with neighboring Israel and prompting the government to suspend the movie's production.

Muslims walk past Indian paramilitary soldiers after offering prayers during Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, in Jammu, India, Monday, Aug.12, 2019. An uneasy calm prevailed in Indian-administered Kashmir on Monday as people celebrated a major Islamic festival during a severe crackdown after India moved to strip the disputed region of its constitutional autonomy and imposed an indefinite curfew. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Troops let Muslims walk to mosques in Indian-ruled Kashmir

- Associated Press

Troops in India-administered Kashmir allowed some Muslims to walk to local mosques alone or in pairs to pray for the Eid al-Adha festival on Monday during an unprecedented security lockdown that still forced most people in the disputed region to stay indoors on the Islamic holy day.

Bribe or donation? Parent's defense questions the difference

- Associated Press

Robert Zangrillo is accused of paying $250,000 to get his daughter into college as a fake athlete. Prosecutors call it a bribe. But his lawyers say Zangrillo isn't much different from parents who make formal donations to try to give their children an advantage in the admissions process.

A statue of Pope John Paul II stands outside the island's main cathedral, Dulce Nombre de Maria Cathedral-Basilica, during a Mass in Hagatna, Guam, Tuesday, May 7, 2019. Those old enough to remember often cite the pontiff's visit to the island in 1981 as the most thrilling event of their lifetimes, memorialized by the bronze statue of the now-sainted pope designed to slowly rotate on a concrete pedestal. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Survivors allege clergy sex abuse on Catholic island of Guam

- Associated Press

Isolated on an emerald green hunk of volcanic rock closer to Tokyo than Honolulu, people on the U.S. territory of Guam like to joke that whatever happens on the mainland takes a long time to reach them. While the U.S. Catholic Church has been roiled by the child sexual abuse scandal for nearly two decades, the island's faithful are still reckoning with new revelations from survivors long shamed into silence by men who claimed divine authority.

Indian Paramilitary soldiers drag barbwire as they prepare to impose curfew in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Authorities in Hindu-majority India clamped a complete shutdown on Kashmir as they scrapped the Muslim-majority state's special status, including exclusive hereditary rights and a separate constitution, and divided it into two territories. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

India arrests more than 500 in Kashmir as Pakistan cuts railway

- Associated Press

Indian security forces have arrested more than 500 people since New Delhi imposed a communications blackout and security clampdown in divided Kashmir, where people remained holed up in their homes for a fourth day.

Indian activists and others shout slogans during a protest against Indian government revoking Kashmir's special constitutional status in Bangalore, India, Monday, Aug. 5, 2019. India's government has revoked disputed Kashmir's special status with a presidential order as thousands of newly deployed troops arrived and internet and phone services were cut in the restive Himalayan region where most people oppose Indian rule. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

Kashmir on edge, locked down, as India looks to split state

- Associated Press

India's lower house of Parliament was set to ratify a bill Tuesday downgrading the governance of the Indian-administered portion of Muslim-majority Kashmir, as an indefinite security lockdown continued in the disputed Himalayan region.

In this June 22, 2018, file photo, women wait in line to ride go carts at a road safety event for female drivers launched at the Riyadh Park Mall in Riyadh. Saudi Arabia has issued new laws that grant women greater freedoms by allowing any citizen to apply for a passport and travel freely, ending a long-standing and controversial guardianship policy that had required male consent for a woman to travel or carry a passport. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty, File)

Saudi Arabia allows women to travel without male consent

- Associated Press

Saudi Arabia on Friday published new laws that loosen restrictions on women by allowing all citizens -- women and men alike -- to apply for a passport and travel freely, ending a long-standing guardianship policy that had controlled women's freedom of movement.

Bandwagon builds for LGBTQ diversity on children's TV

- Associated Press

Wilson Cruz, a co-star in the new Hulu animated children's series "The Bravest Knight," describes the show's dad couple this way: "We're not explaining homosexuality, or same-gender sexuality. We're talking about the love of a family."

In this July 18, 2019, file photo, a migrant father and daughter sit on the sidewalk after getting off a bus that brought them all the way from Nuevo Laredo to Monterrey, Mexico. The group was placed on the bus by Mexican migration authorities, arriving in this northern Mexican city late at night and left them to fend for themselves with no support on housing, work or schooling for children, who appear to make up about half the group. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

ACLU says illegal family separations still occurring at border

- The Washington Times

The ACLU said Tuesday that the Trump administration is still wrongly separating children from their parents at the border and asked a federal judge to order that kids be kept with adults even in cases when the government says there are serious health concerns or threats to the child's safety.

Sergiev Posad is about to change from a small town with a monastery into a home base for Russian Orthodox Christians that can rival the Vatican. (Associated Press photograph)

Putin to transform historic town into 'Orthodox Vatican' as symbol of Russian power

Sergiev Posad, the formr home of the Orthodox Church's Moscow Patriarchate, is not quite St. Peter's Square, but some Orthodox officials and believers see the germ of a vaulting ambition to create a home base for the Russian national faith that can rival the Roman Catholic ministate in the heart of Rome.

Juul Labs co-founder and Chief Product Officer James Monsees testifies before a House Oversight and Government Reform subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 25, 2019, during a hearing on the youth nicotine epidemic. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Juul exec: Never intended electronic cigarette for teens

- Associated Press

A top executive for Juul Labs said that his company never intended its electronic cigarettes to be adopted by underage teenagers, as House lawmakers on Thursday accused the company of fueling the vaping craze among high schoolers.

Judge temporarily blocks new Arkansas anti-abortion laws

- Associated Press

A federal judge blocked three new abortion restrictions from taking effect Wednesday in Arkansas, including a measure that opponents say would likely force the state's only surgical abortion clinic to close.

In this Feb. 6, 2019, file photo provided by Providence Health & Services, from left, Sam Adamson, Lori Riddle, Hailey Hardcastle, and Derek Evans pose at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, Ore. The teens introduced legislation to allow students to take "mental health days" as they would sick days in an attempt to respond to a mental health crisis gripping the state. (Jessica Adamson/Providence Health & Services via AP)

Teen activists score mental health days for Oregon students

- Associated Press

Oregon will allow students to take "mental health days" just as they would sick days, expanding the reasons for excused school absences to include mental or behavioral health under a new law that experts say is one of the first of its kind in the U.S.

This image taken from video provided by WSET-TV shows a sign "America: Love it or Leave It." posted outside the Friendship Baptist Church in Appomattox, Va., on Tuesday, July 16, 2019.    Amid a national furor over President Donald Trumps tweet urging four Democratic congresswomen to go back to their home countries,  Pastor E. W. Lucas is gaining attention with the sign at his church  (WSET-TV via AP) . MANDATORY CREDIT   LYNCHBURG AND ROANOKE OUT

Church backs Trump with 'America: Love or Leave It' sign

Associated Press

Amid a national furor over President Donald Trump's tweet urging four Democratic congresswomen to "go back" to their home countries, a Virginia pastor is gaining attention with a sign at his church saying "America: Love or Leave It."

Recent Opinion Columns

In this image from video provided by Senate TV, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine., speaks on the Senate floor about her vote on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kananaugh, Friday, Oct. 5, 2018 in the Capitol in Washington.  Sen Shelly Capito, R-W.Va., sits rear left and Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., sits right.  (Senate TV via AP)

Susan Collins' finest hour

In a speech announcing her vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican, reminded me of some of the great orators of the past. Her speech was measured in tone, substantive in content and delivered with conviction.

Religious Oppression in China Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the Chinese government stifles religious faith

Several years ago during a visit to the United States, President Xi Jinping was interviewed by a Chinese national living in the United States. After the interview, Mr. Xi asked a single question of this reporter — not about his family, not about his studies, not about whether he enjoyed living in America — the one question he asked was "Why do so many Chinese students studying in the United States become Christians?"

Illustration on the continued need for impartial justice by ALexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Lady Justice must be blind

George Barna, in his book "What Americans Believe," points out that 87 percent of non-Christians and 77 percent of self-described born-again Christians agreed with the statement "People are basically good." Our culture by and large has discarded the idea of original sin.

Illustration on the attractiveness of Socialism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unthinking and the unobservant

This past week, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a self-proclaimed socialist, won the Democratic primary for a congressional seat in New York. Why would a sane person advocate a political movement that was responsible for well over a hundred million deaths in the last century, as well as untold misery? By her comments, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez revealed a couple of things about herself. The first is an ignorance of history — because it is unlikely that she really meant to be an advocate for a cause that often results in mass death and destruction — and that she is unable to think beyond stage 1, or the first order effect of a policy.

Illustration on anti-Christian bias by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting all Americans from anti-religious hostility

Seven justices of the U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission was unconstitutionally biased against the religious beliefs of Jack Phillips, the owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop.

From The Vault

This Oct. 1, 2017, file photo shows Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington shaking hands with churchgoers at St. Mathews Cathedral after the Red Mass in Washington. Wuerl is defending himself ahead of a forthcoming grand jury report investigating child sexual abuse in six of Pennsylvania's Roman Catholic dioceses. He says the report will be critical of some of his actions as Pittsburgh's bishop. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Pennsylvania report identifies more than 1,000 children molested by priests

- Associated Press

More than 1,000 children -- and possible many more -- were molested by hundreds of Roman Catholic priests in six Pennsylvania dioceses, while senior church officials took steps to cover it up, according to a landmark grand jury report released Tuesday.

A woman holds her hands in prayer as she watches Pope Francis on a  monitor as people await his arrival on Sept. 26, 2015, in Philadelphia. (Associated Press)

God still the co-pilot: U.S. remains the most religious among all Western nations

- The Washington Times

It is fashionable in some circles to purge the presence of God from everyday life, whether it's by banning religious images or language in public places, or media coverage that implies that faith-based anything is not inclusive. Such thinking is not new. In 1966, Time Magazine published an edition titled "Is God Dead?" -- suggesting that the faith was wavering, and the U.S. was on a path to secularization.

The White House is seen at dusk in Washington on Nov. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Trump hosts first Iftar dinner in observance of Ramadan

- The Washington Times

President Trump is hosting his first Iftar dinner Wednesday night at the White House to mark one of the religious observances of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, a gesture that was met with surprise and criticism among some U.S. Muslims.

First lady Melania Trump speaks on her initiatives during an event in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, May 7, 2018, in Washington.  The first lady gave her multipronged effort to promote the well-being of children a minimalist new motto: "BE BEST."  The first lady formally launched her long-awaited initiative after more than a year of reading to children, learning about babies born addicted to drugs and hosting a White House conversation on cyberbullying.   (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Melania Trump unveils 'Be Best' agenda to promote children's well-being

- The Washington Times

First lady Melania Trump rolled out an agenda Monday that focused on enhancing the well-being of children, soldiering on in her duties against one of the Washington press corps' most hostile receptions for a first lady and rabid news coverage of the president's alleged infidelity with adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

In this photo taken Thursday, Aug. 14, 2013, an embryologist works on a petri dish at the Create Health fertility clinic in south London. Since the first test-tube baby was born more than three decades ago, in vitro fertilization has become a sophisticated process with pricey incubators, specialized techniques and extensive screening. Now, scientists are going back to basics and testing a simpler and cheaper method intended mainly for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) ** FILE **

More than 71,000 babies born in 2016 from IVF

- The Washington Times

Babies born using assisted reproductive technology increased in 2016, with 71,296 births counted from the efforts of 377 clinics in the U.S., according to preliminary data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.