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Faith and Family

Stay up to date on the latest news and discussions on religion, faith and family.

Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Chicago Archbishop, right, takes his seat with Mons. Charles Scicluna, Malta Archbishop, and the Rev. Hans Zollner, left, ahead of a press conference on a Vatican summit on preventing clergy sex abuse, at the Vatican, Monday, Feb. 18, 2019. Organizers of Pope Francis' summit on preventing clergy sex abuse will meet this week with a dozen survivor-activists who have come to Rome to protest the Catholic Church's response to date and demand an end to decades of cover-up by church leaders. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Catholics sex abuse summit sidesteps role of gay priests

By Christopher Vondracek - The Washington Times

Some conservative U.S. Catholics are dismayed by the official schedule for Pope Francis' Vatican summit with bishops on clerical sex abuse that begins Thursday, saying it ignores the root cause of the scandal: gays in the priesthood. Published February 20, 2019

Ukrainian soldiers drive APCs near Urzuf, south coast of Azov sea, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Ukraine put its military forces on high combat alert and announced martial law this week after Russian border guards fired on and seized three Ukrainian ships in the Black Sea. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)

Ukraine bars entry to Russian males, upping ante in conflict

By Yuras Karmanau and Nataliya Vasilyeva - Associated Press

Ukrainian officials on Friday upped the ante in the growing confrontation with Russia, announcing a travel ban for most Russian males and searching the home of an influential cleric of the Russian Orthodox Church. Published November 30, 2018

Recent Stories

Law enforcement are seen at the scene following reports of gunfire, Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2019, in Jersey City, N.J. AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)

Jersey City's mayor says gunmen targeted kosher market

Associated Press

The mayor of a New Jersey city said Wednesday that authorities believe gunmen targeted a kosher market during a furious shooting that killed six people and filled the streets with the sounds of heavy gunfire for hours just across the Hudson River from New York City.

Fox News' Sean Hannity topped the list of the nation's "most important" radio hosts, according to Talkers Magazine. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Sean Hannity says he's at his best when he devotes 'quiet time' to God

- The Washington Times

Fox News prime-time host Sean Hannity consistently tops the ratings at his network, typically drawing 3 million nightly viewers who are eager for his take on politics and life in America. Mr. Hannity is also a man of faith and publicly reveals the particulars during an upcoming two-part appearance on Fox Nation, the network's popular on-demand streaming service.

In this Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, file photo, the Rev. Mark Stelzer, a professor and chaplain at College of Our Lady of the Elms, speaks with sacristan Marlene Czepiel, right, in the sacristy before offering Mass in the school's chapel, in Chicopee, Mass. Stelzer is also administrator of St. Jerome's Parish, in Holyoke, Mass., where he lives alone in a rectory while serving as spiritual leader to the 500 families in the Catholic parish. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

U.S. Catholic priests beset by overwork, isolation, scandals

- Associated Press

More than a century ago, waves of Catholic immigrants from Ireland, Poland and Quebec settled in Chicopee and other western Massachusetts mill towns, helping build churches, rectories and schools to accommodate their faith. Today the priests leading those churches are under siege due to stresses, challenges and sex abuse scandals complicating their lives and those of their fellow priests across the United States.

In this Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019, photo, a wooden figure is displayed in the Church of the Nativity, traditionally believed by Christians to be the birthplace of Jesus Christ, in the West Bank city of Bethlehem. As visitors descend on Bethlehem this Christmas, they have the option of staying in restored centuries-old guesthouses, taking food tours of local markets, and perusing the dystopian art in and around a hotel designed by the British graffiti artist Banksy. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)

Palestinians in Bethlehem look beyond religious tourism

- Associated Press

For decades, the people of Bethlehem have watched tour buses drive up to the Church of the Nativity, disgorge their passengers for a few hours at the traditional birthplace of Jesus, and then return to Israel.

Museum director Piotr Cywinski, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and deputy director Andrzej Kacorzyk, from left, visit the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland on Friday, Friday, Dec. 6, 2019. Merkel attend an event in occasion of the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Auschwitz Foundation. (Photo/Markus Schreiber)

Germany's Angela Merkel begins her first ever visit to Auschwitz

- Associated Press

German Chancellor Angela Merkel entered the hallowed grounds of the former Nazi German death camp of Auschwitz on Friday as she began her first ever visit to the most notorious site of the atrocities that Adolf Hitler's regime inflicted on Europe.

Buffalo bishop resigns under fire for handling of misconduct

- Associated Press

Bishop Richard Malone of Buffalo resigned Wednesday, forced to step aside amid mounting calls for his ouster from his staff, priests and public over his handling of allegations of clergy sexual misconduct.

In this Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019, photo, attorney Adam Slater takes a phone call on a patio outside his high-rise Manhattan office overlooking St. Patrick's Cathedral, in New York. Slater's firm is representing clients accusing the Roman Catholic Church of sexual abuse, a clientele that is rapidly growing after New York state opened its one-year window allowing sex abuse suits with no statute of limitations. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) ** FILE **

Legal reckoning: New abuse suits could cost the Catholic Church more than $4B

- Associated Press

At the end of another long day trying to sign up new clients accusing the Roman Catholic Church of sexual abuse, lawyer Adam Slater gazes out the window of his high-rise Manhattan office at one of the great symbols of the church, St. Patrick's Cathedral.

A wooden relic believed to be from Jesus' manger is seen at the Notre Dame church in Jerusalem, Friday, Nov. 29, 2019. Christians are celebrating the return to the Holy Land of a tiny wooden relic believed to be from Jesus' manger nearly 1,400 years after it was sent to Rome as a gift to the pope. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Relic believed from Jesus' manger arrives in Bethlehem

- The Washington Times

A tiny wooden relic that some Christians believe to be part of Jesus' manger arrived Saturday in its permanent home in the biblical city of Bethlehem 1,400 years after it was sent to Rome as a gift to the pope.

A sample of classified Chinese government documents leaked to a consortium of news organizations, is displayed for a picture in New York, Friday, Nov. 22, 2019. Beijing has detained more than a million Uighurs, ethnic Kazakhs and other Muslim minorities for what it calls voluntary job training. The confidential documents lay out the Chinese government's deliberate strategy to lock up ethnic minorities to rewire their thoughts and even the language they speak. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Secret documents reveal how China mass detention camps work

Associated Press

The watch towers, double-locked doors and video surveillance in the Chinese camps are there "to prevent escapes." Uighurs and other minorities held inside are scored on how well they speak the dominant Mandarin language and follow strict rules on everything down to bathing and using the toilet, scores that determine if they can leave.

Pope Francis signs a visitors' book at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park for a meeting in Hiroshima, western Japan, Sunday, Nov. 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Pope, in Hiroshima, demands world leaders renounce 'immoral' nukes

- Associated Press

Pope Francis traveled to Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Sunday to demand that world powers renounce their nuclear arsenals, declaring the use and possession of atomic bombs an "immoral" crime and a dangerous waste.

Pope Francis, center, offers prayer during his meeting with priests, religious seminarians and catechists at Saint Peter's Parish on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand, Friday, Nov. 22, 2019. Pope Francis urged more efforts to combat the "humiliation" of women and children forced into prostitution as he began a busy visit Thursday to Thailand, where human trafficking and poverty help fuel the sex tourism industry. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Francis fulfills dream, goes to Japan as missionary pope

- Associated Press

Pope Francis will fulfill his dream to be a missionary in Japan when he arrives for a three-day visit with two main aims: to appeal for nuclear disarmament and minister to a tiny Catholic flock with a rich but bloody history.

This June 8, 2019, file photo shows Joshua K. Love sitting for a portrait in the living room of his home in Greenwood, Miss. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

Catholic Church pressured victims into unfair settlements, lawsuit claims

- Associated Press

Two impoverished Mississippi men who say they were sexually assaulted by Franciscan missionaries filed a federal lawsuit Thursday claiming that Catholic officials pressured them into signing settlements that paid them little money and required them to remain silent about the alleged abuse.

M. Russell Ballard, a senior leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and acting president of the Quorum of Twelve Apostles, speaks during an interview, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019, at the Associated Press headquarters in New York. (AP Photo/Emily Leshner)

Mormon leader: We didn't leave Boy Scouts, they left us

- Associated Press

A high-ranking leader with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said Friday the church severed its century-long tie with the Boy Scouts of America because the organization made changes that pushed it away from the church.

Recent Opinion Columns

In this image from video provided by Senate TV, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine., speaks on the Senate floor about her vote on Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kananaugh, Friday, Oct. 5, 2018 in the Capitol in Washington.  Sen Shelly Capito, R-W.Va., sits rear left and Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, R-Miss., sits right.  (Senate TV via AP)

Susan Collins' finest hour

In a speech announcing her vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sen. Susan Collins, Maine Republican, reminded me of some of the great orators of the past. Her speech was measured in tone, substantive in content and delivered with conviction.

Religious Oppression in China Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the Chinese government stifles religious faith

Several years ago during a visit to the United States, President Xi Jinping was interviewed by a Chinese national living in the United States. After the interview, Mr. Xi asked a single question of this reporter — not about his family, not about his studies, not about whether he enjoyed living in America — the one question he asked was "Why do so many Chinese students studying in the United States become Christians?"

Illustration on the continued need for impartial justice by ALexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Lady Justice must be blind

George Barna, in his book "What Americans Believe," points out that 87 percent of non-Christians and 77 percent of self-described born-again Christians agreed with the statement "People are basically good." Our culture by and large has discarded the idea of original sin.

Illustration on the attractiveness of Socialism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unthinking and the unobservant

This past week, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a self-proclaimed socialist, won the Democratic primary for a congressional seat in New York. Why would a sane person advocate a political movement that was responsible for well over a hundred million deaths in the last century, as well as untold misery? By her comments, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez revealed a couple of things about herself. The first is an ignorance of history — because it is unlikely that she really meant to be an advocate for a cause that often results in mass death and destruction — and that she is unable to think beyond stage 1, or the first order effect of a policy.

Illustration on anti-Christian bias by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting all Americans from anti-religious hostility

Seven justices of the U.S. Supreme Court recently agreed that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission was unconstitutionally biased against the religious beliefs of Jack Phillips, the owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop.

From The Vault

This Oct. 1, 2017, file photo shows Cardinal Donald Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington shaking hands with churchgoers at St. Mathews Cathedral after the Red Mass in Washington. Wuerl is defending himself ahead of a forthcoming grand jury report investigating child sexual abuse in six of Pennsylvania's Roman Catholic dioceses. He says the report will be critical of some of his actions as Pittsburgh's bishop. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Pennsylvania report identifies more than 1,000 children molested by priests

- Associated Press

More than 1,000 children -- and possible many more -- were molested by hundreds of Roman Catholic priests in six Pennsylvania dioceses, while senior church officials took steps to cover it up, according to a landmark grand jury report released Tuesday.

A woman holds her hands in prayer as she watches Pope Francis on a  monitor as people await his arrival on Sept. 26, 2015, in Philadelphia. (Associated Press)

God still the co-pilot: U.S. remains the most religious among all Western nations

- The Washington Times

It is fashionable in some circles to purge the presence of God from everyday life, whether it's by banning religious images or language in public places, or media coverage that implies that faith-based anything is not inclusive. Such thinking is not new. In 1966, Time Magazine published an edition titled "Is God Dead?" -- suggesting that the faith was wavering, and the U.S. was on a path to secularization.

The White House is seen at dusk in Washington on Nov. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Trump hosts first Iftar dinner in observance of Ramadan

- The Washington Times

President Trump is hosting his first Iftar dinner Wednesday night at the White House to mark one of the religious observances of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, a gesture that was met with surprise and criticism among some U.S. Muslims.

First lady Melania Trump speaks on her initiatives during an event in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, May 7, 2018, in Washington.  The first lady gave her multipronged effort to promote the well-being of children a minimalist new motto: "BE BEST."  The first lady formally launched her long-awaited initiative after more than a year of reading to children, learning about babies born addicted to drugs and hosting a White House conversation on cyberbullying.   (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Melania Trump unveils 'Be Best' agenda to promote children's well-being

- The Washington Times

First lady Melania Trump rolled out an agenda Monday that focused on enhancing the well-being of children, soldiering on in her duties against one of the Washington press corps' most hostile receptions for a first lady and rabid news coverage of the president's alleged infidelity with adult film actress Stormy Daniels.

In this photo taken Thursday, Aug. 14, 2013, an embryologist works on a petri dish at the Create Health fertility clinic in south London. Since the first test-tube baby was born more than three decades ago, in vitro fertilization has become a sophisticated process with pricey incubators, specialized techniques and extensive screening. Now, scientists are going back to basics and testing a simpler and cheaper method intended mainly for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) ** FILE **

More than 71,000 babies born in 2016 from IVF

- The Washington Times

Babies born using assisted reproductive technology increased in 2016, with 71,296 births counted from the efforts of 377 clinics in the U.S., according to preliminary data from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.