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In this March 13, 2021 file photo, Tamika Palmer, center, the mother of Breonna Taylor, leads a march through the streets of downtown Louisville on the one-year anniversary of her death in Louisville, Ky. The Justice Department said Tuesday, Sept. 14, it is curtailing federal agents’ use of so-called “no-knock” warrants — which allow law enforcement agents to enter a home without announcing their presence — and would also prohibit its agents from using chokeholds in most circumstances. The updated policy follows the March 2020 death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot and killed by police in her home during a no-knock warrant and whose death led to months of mass protests over racial injustice in policing and the treatment of Black people in the United States. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)
Photo by: Timothy D. Easley
In this March 13, 2021 file photo, Tamika Palmer, center, the mother of Breonna Taylor, leads a march through the streets of downtown Louisville on the one-year anniversary of her death in Louisville, Ky. The Justice Department said Tuesday, Sept. 14, it is curtailing federal agents’ use of so-called “no-knock” warrants — which allow law enforcement agents to enter a home without announcing their presence — and would also prohibit its agents from using chokeholds in most circumstances. The updated policy follows the March 2020 death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot and killed by police in her home during a no-knock warrant and whose death led to months of mass protests over racial injustice in policing and the treatment of Black people in the United States. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

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