- The Washington Times - Thursday, June 23, 2016

“A majority — 55 percent — of Americans believe that the American way of life needs to be protected against foreign influence,” says a wide-reaching poll conducted by Brookings Institution which revealed a greater urgency among some respondents.

Three-fourths of Republicans and 83 percent of those who support presumptive nominee Donald Trump say this influence must be “curtailed.” In contrast, only four in 10 Democrats agree. The poll focused on public concern over immigration and cultural change, and how these worries shape the 2016 presidential election.

“The survey revealed the presence of a new strain of protectionism,” an analysis noted. “Republicans, and particularly Trump supporters, strongly believe the American way of life needs to be protected from foreign influence on both the economic and cultural fronts.”

The findings also broached some sensitive subjects, revealing that 57 percent of Americans overall agree “the values of Islam are at odds with American values and way of life.” There are some partisan divides: Among Republicans, the number was 79 percent, among Democrats 42 percent.

“The public is also divided over whether so-called ‘reverse discrimination,’ or discrimination against whites, is as big a problem as discrimination against blacks and other minorities: 49 percent agree and 49 percent disagree,” the analysis said. “There are huge partisan disparities on this question: 81 percent of Trump supporters and 72 percent of Republicans agree with this statement, compared to only 32 percent of Democrats.”

REV UP AIR FORCE ONE


SEE ALSO: Donald Trump’s Scotland jaunt baffles Republican strategists


President Obama is still fundraising. And the magnificent but pricey Air Force One is still his ride.

Mr. Obama quietly slipped out of the nation’s capital for a three-day West Coast trip on Thursday. He’ll be privately raising cash for Democratic causes in San Jose, California, on Friday; his stay also includes some social time with Facebook founder and billionaire Mark Zuckerberg. Then it’s on to Seattle for two more evening fundraisers, one for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the other for Gov. Jay Inslee.

The president remains in Seattle overnight. Is a round of golf on either coast on the schedule? That is a mystery, though one thing has not changed. Air Force One still costs $206,000 an hour to operate.

CHANGE AMONG THE YOUNGEST AMERICANS

“It’s official: Minority babies are the majority among the nation’s infants,” reads a new Pew Research Center headline for an analysis of new Census Bureau data. It finds that 50.2 percent of U.S.-born babies under one-year-old are “racial or ethnic minorities.” Numbers-wise, that’s 1,995,102 minority babies compared with 1,982,936 “non-Hispanic white infants.”

The federal agency projects that the latter demographic will cease to be the majority in the U.S. in 28 years.

ONE FOR THE OLD BATTLEFIELDS

Federal funds for an understandable cause: The National Park Service has allotted $1.1 million to preserve 20 significant but fragile old battlefields in 14 states around the nation. The sites represent more than 300 years of U.S. history.

The money is being handed out in modest, individual grants to multiple organizations, each receiving about $35,000 for projects centered on everything from practical repairs to archaeological research. Awards go to shore up a concrete aircraft shelter that was at the center of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and for the upkeep of multiple Civil War and Revolutionary War sites. Among the funding recipients: An American Legion post and a preservation group founded by the Seneca Nation of Indians.

“These places hold important clues to our past,” observes agency director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “Preserving and understanding these sites allows us to better understand the complex history of these conflicts, as well as stories of sacrifice and heroism that ultimately shaped our nation today.”

WEEKEND CANDIDATE TRACKER

Sen. Bernard Sanders appears to be a semi-retired presidential candidate. But he’s not done yet. Mr. Sanders has been lingering in New York City after he delivered yet another speech earlier this week. He’s now heading north to Syracuse for the weekend, and for more of the same.

The Hillary Clinton camp has ramped up operations. Former President Bill Clinton hosts a Chicago fundraiser Saturday; tickets are priced up to $50,000 each. The candidate herself heads to Indianapolis this weekend to attend the U.S. Conference of Mayors annual meeting, appearing with the Dalai Lama, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber. No, really. That’s the line-up. Mrs. Clinton is then off for Cincinnati for an evening fundraiser Sunday, to be followed by her first appearance with Sen. Elizabeth Warren the following morning.

And Donald Trump? He left Thursday night on a weekend jaunt to Scotland, peeking in on pair of fabulous golf courses he owns in Turnberry and Aberdeen, and presumably will return to the U.S. on Sunday. Son Eric Trump assures crabby critics that his father will return to the campaign trail on his arrival home.

WEEKEND REAL ESTATE

For sale: Stone cottage built in 1803 in Phillipsburg, New Jersey. Former school house; two bedrooms, two baths, 1,000 square feet. Living and dining rooms, open beam ceilings, large stone fireplace with hand-carved mantle, wide plank wood floors, original staircase, woodworking and built-ins. Stone exterior, deck, patio, small pond. Priced at $129,000 through SeeInsideTheHouse.com. Enter 3299207 in “search MLS” function.

POLL DU JOUR

77 percent of Republicans say their spouse is also a Republican; 77 percent of Democrats say their spouse is a Democrat.

77 percent of Republicans say they have some friends who are Democrats; 69 percent of Democrats have some friends who are Republicans.

56 percent of Republicans say their immediate family is also Republican; 70 percent of Democrats say their close family are also Democrats.

50 percent of Republicans say political discussions with people in another political party are “stressful and frustrating”; 46 percent of Democrats agree.

48 percent of Republicans say these discussions are “interesting and informative”; 52 percent of Democrats agree.

Source: A Pew Research Center poll of 4,385 U.S. adults conducted in March and April and released Wednesday.

Nervous ramblings, talking points to [email protected]

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