- - Tuesday, May 17, 2016

1| What the Latest Bible Research Reveals About Millennials |Christianity Today

***Like we see so often in the stories of the Bible itself (2 Kings 22, Ezra 8), spiritual renewal is linked with a rekindling of reading and trust in the Scriptures.

Practicing Christian millennials are bucking a trend.Overall, this generation is less likely to read or trust the Bible than any other. More than half (55%) are “Bible-neutral” or “Bible-skeptical,” compared to 45 percent of teens, 51 percent of Gen-Xers, 40 percent of Boomers, and 40 percent of Elders.

…Yet Christian youth who go to church and care about their faith may know the Bible better than older Christians. Practicing millennials are more likely to believe the Bible came from God and read it multiple times a week than any other generation (87%), according to a six-year American Bible Society (ABS) and Barna Group study of Bible engagement in the United States.(The report surveyed millennials, which it defined as those born between 1984 and 1998. Gen-Xers were born between 1965 and 1983, Boomers were born from 1946 to 1964, and Elders were born before 1946. Teens were those ages 13 to 17 in 2015. Practicing describes those who identify as Christian, say their faith is important in their lives, and have been to church within the past month.)

…Practicing describes those who identify as Christian, say their faith is important in their lives, and have been to church within the past month.) In fact, the way practicing Christian millennials engage with the Bible looks a lot like the way their parents and grandparents do.

In fact, the way practicing Christian millennials engage with the Bible looks a lot like the way their parents and grandparents do.


2| Little Sisters of the Poor win at Supreme Court |Becket Fund

[Yesterday], the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously decided to send back to the lower courts the case of the Little Sisters of the Poor, a group of nuns who care for the elderly poor. The Court’s decision is a win for the Little Sisters and other groups who needed relief from draconian government fines.

In its decision, the Supreme Court held that after its unprecedented call for supplemental briefing that the lower courts should again review the cases.

“We are very encouraged by the Court’s decision, which is an important win for the Little Sisters. The Court has recognized that the government changed its position,” said Mark Rienzi, senior counsel at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty and lead Becket attorney for the Little Sisters of the Poor. “It is crucial that the Justices unanimously ordered the government not to impose these fines and indicated that the government doesn’t need any notice to figure out what should now be obvious—the Little Sisters respectfully object. There is still work to be done, but today’s decision indicates that we will ultimately prevail in court.” 


3| Forsaking The GOP Isn’t Going To Help The Evangelical Cause |The Daily Caller

However much Trump may be offensive to evangelical leaders, he is still the only major party candidate who takes a pro-life stance and is willing to take the advice of religious conservatives. Hillary Clinton certainly won’t be a friend to social conservatives, and it’s worth noting that the last Republican presidential nominee had a history of taking social liberal policies before running in the party primaries. There wasn’t a #NeverRomney movement in 2012 though.

If evangelicals don’t want to vote for Trump, no one is going to force them to and there’s ways for them to stay in the GOP without having to. But to abandon the party is to abandon their political relevancy.


4| Lessons from a farmer |Baptist Press

***The author equates the patient work of farming with the work of Christian ministry. 

There is joy in the harvest, and the greatest satisfaction belongs to the one who carefully cultivated it all along the way. The hard-working farmer, as Paul says in 2 Timothy 2:6, is the one “who ought to have the first share of the crops.” I’ve taken that to mean that the farmer eats of his labor, but, in talking to Travis, I see that it means so much more.

Joy results from his long-term faithfulness. He is content in his work and in seeing what it’s produced over the years. He has learned the secret joy of trusting in God’s providence. But there is also joy for Travis in what he cannot see. He explains how one tiny seed becomes a huge plant that produces seeds a thousand fold. The harvest multiplies itself and goes out into the world in a way that he will never see with his own eyes.

In our work and in our weariness, let us look to the farmer. Let us keep the big picture in mind. If we don’t give up, one day we will enjoy the final harvest and its bountiful rewards.

 

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