- The Washington Times - Wednesday, July 4, 2018

Stand aside, now. Here’s yet another poll to vex news media and Democratic Party, both long convinced that President Trump would be out of office by now. A new Gallup poll finds that a majority of Americans now believe the nation has a brighter future, a sentiment which had dwindled in previous years.

“Fifty-five percent of U.S. adults believe the United States’ best days are ‘ahead of us,’ while 41 percent say they are ‘behind us.’ Americans are more optimistic about the country’s future than they were the last time Gallup polled on the question, in December 2012, when Americans were nearly evenly split in their views,” writes Justin McCarthy, a Gallup analyst.

“The latest data, collected in a June 18-24 Gallup poll, come as satisfaction with the direction of the U.S. has reached a 12-year high, with 38 percent of Americans saying they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country. U.S. adults are also noticing the effects of a robust job market, with about two in three saying it is a good time to find a quality job. By comparison, 23 percent were satisfied with the direction of the country in December 2012, and 19 percent said it was a good time to find a job,” Mr. McCarthy says.

Wait, wasn’t the Obama administration in power then? Why yes. It was.

The inevitable partisan divide: 7 in 10 Republicans and 54 percent of independents say the best days for the U.S. are ahead. Democrats are dithering: 47 percent say the good times are in the future, 49 percent say there are not.

TRUMP OFF TO TAME MONTANA

President Trump is in business mode Thursday, bound for Great Falls, Montana, — population 59,000 and located on the Missouri River. The occasion is a classic Make America Great Again rally for thousands of Trump fans, and one with specific intent.

“This will be another great chance for President Trump to connect directly with patriotic Americans without the filter of the fake news media, to celebrate all of the successes of the Trump agenda,” notes Michael Glassner, chief operating officer of Trump campaign operations.

The president will also remind Montanans to vote Republican when the time comes, with particularly support for Republican Senate hopeful Matt Rosendale, seeking to unseat incumbent Sen. Jon Tester, a Democrat. Local emotions are percolating. The Roadhouse Diner, for example, has created “Commander in Beef,” a new burger to honor Mr. Trump which features American cheese, grilled onions and a side of “Freedom Fries.” Protesters plan a “Grab Him by the Hypocrisy Rally” and say they’ll be waiting on the city streets.

“I’m planning on taking my kids to see President Trump. Not because we love, love, love Trump. But because he’s the president of the United States, and he’s going to be in Great Falls,” notes local resident and environmental consultant Scott Vosen, in a guest editorial for the Great Falls Tribune.

He advises potential protesters to stay civil.

“I also hope everyone respects the rights of others to engage in a patriotic act of turning out to see a sitting president here in Podunkville without spewing political vitriol. Along those lines, even if you dislike Trump, please be respectful enough to not reserve tickets for the sole purpose of preventing others from securing them. I heard that this has been happening. I mean, seriously?” asks Mr. Vosen.

ADVENTURES WITH DEMOCRATS

It’s the clash of the septuagenarian titans. Or something like that.

“Biden and Sanders are neck and neck for 2020! Oprah ahead of Warren, Harris and Booker!” reports exuberant Zogby Analytics headlines, this after the pollster surveyed 495 likely Democratic primary voters.

Indeed, in the White House derby among Democrats, former Vice President Joe Biden has garnered 21 percent of the vote, Sen. Bernard Sanders 19 percent. But there are 10 other potential hopefuls in this poll. Oprah Winfrey is third in popularity with 10 percent, followed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (6 percent), Sen. Kamala Harris (5 percent), New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Cory Booker, each with 4 percent; former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and former U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., each with 1 percent; and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick with 0 percent of the vote.

Another 29 percent of the voters are not sure who they support, however.

“Is there still enough time for someone new to emerge?” demands Zogby. “Maybe it’s Michael Bloomberg.”

FOXIFIED

There is no stopping Fox News Channel, which has been the most-watched cable news channel for the last 16 years according to Nielsen Media Research.

These days, Fox News remains No. 1 in the entire cable realm, marking two years as the most popular channel, with 10 of the most-watched cable news programs, with “Hannity” in the lead, drawing 3.7 million viewers. “The Ingraham Angle” is marking its largest audience yet with 2.7 million viewers while “Fox & Friends” has been the most-watched cable news morning show for the last 200 consecutive months.

Fox Business Network, meanwhile, is the No. 1 network in business news for almost two years, besting rival CNBC, which has drawn the lowest number of viewers since 2014. And a victory for anchor Maria Bartiromo; “Mornings with Maria” drew a record-breaking number of viewers, outpacing CNBC’s “Squawk Box” for the first time.

POLL DU JOUR

17 percent of Americans say the U.S. Mint should stop making pennies and nickels; 17 percent of Republicans, 17 percent of independents and 18 percent of Democrats agree.

17 percent of Americans say the Mint should stop making pennies but keep making nickels; 21 percent of Republicans, 17 percent of independents and 18 percent of Democrats agree.

38 percent overall say the Mint should change how pennies and nickels are made to cut down on cost of making them; 39 percent of Republicans, 40 percent of independents and 38 percent of Democrats agree.

6 percent overall say the U.S. should get rid of coin money entirely; 5 percent of Republicans, 6 percent of independents and 6 percent of Democrats agree.

22 percent overall are not sure how to keep the coin-costs down; 18 percent of Republicans, 20 percent of independents and 20 percent of Democrats agree.

Source: A YouGov poll of 6.241 U.S. adults conducted online July 3.

Kindly follow Jennifer Harper on Twitter @HarperBulletin


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