- Associated Press - Monday, March 26, 2018

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - Some of the non-catches that have prompted debate and a proposal by the NFL’s competition committee to rewrite the rules:

Bert Emanuel, Buccaneers (2000) - In the NFC championship game at St. Louis, Emanuel appeared to make a fourth-quarter catch to put Tampa Bay in position to beat the Rams. But it was ruled incomplete because the tip of the ball touched the ground, even though Emanuel never lost control.

Calvin Johnson, Lions (2010) - Against Chicago, Megatron’s “mega-catch” turned into a no-catch in the end zone even though Johnson jumped, made the reception, got two feet down and had a Bears defender fall into him. Johnson put his hand down and rolled over, then put the ball against the ground as he got up to celebrate.

Dez Bryant, Cowboys (2015): Bryant had single coverage down the left sideline at Lambeau Field and Tony Romo hit him as the Dallas wideout leaped near the goal line. He came down inside the 1, got both feet down and even took a third step before stumbling. In doing so, as Bryant switched the ball into his left hand and reached the ground, the ball moved. The call was reversed to incomplete and Dallas soon lost the playoff game.

Zach Miller, Bears (2017) - On a play at New Orleans in which the tight end broke his left leg, the TD call was overturned on review. It was determined that he lost the ball as he fell to the ground in pain, even though he twice touched down one foot, though he slipped when his leg broke.

Jesse James, Steelers (2017) - Pittsburgh was driving for the winning touchdown against New England when James caught a pass just short of the goal line and his knee hit the ground. But he hadn’t been touched by a Patriot, and his second foot hit the ground as he reached over the goal line with the ball. However, the ball came loose when his elbow made contact with the ground. The TD call was overturned, New England won and earned home-field advantage for the AFC playoffs.

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