- Associated Press - Tuesday, July 16, 2019

MADISON, Wis. (AP) - The Latest on a Democratic bill to revamp Wisconsin’s legislative redistricting process (all times local):

2:10 p.m.

Assembly Republicans and the state Elections Commission want Democratic voters to pay $64,351 in costs after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last month negated the voters’ lawsuit challenging Republican-drawn legislative boundaries.

The voters filed a federal lawsuit in 2015 alleging maps the GOP drew in 2011 unconstitutionally consolidated Republican supporters. The Supreme Court ruled in late June that federal judges have no role in gerrymandering cases, essentially ending the Wisconsin lawsuit.

Assembly Republicans filed an invoice Monday seeking $45,043 to cover expenses including making copies and witness travel to depositions in Chicago in April and May. The commission filed an invoice on Monday as well seeking $19,308 to cover transcripts and copies of depositions.



The voters have argued they shouldn’t have to cover the defendants’ costs since they didn’t prevail on the merits.

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11:25 a.m.

Democrats are trying to generate momentum for a bill that would allow civil servants rather than lawmakers draw legislative boundaries.

Sen. Dave Hansen and Rep. Robyn Vining held a news conference Tuesday to promote the bill. The proposal would require the Legislative Reference Bureau to draw the boundaries.

Right now legislators redraw the lines after every census. Republicans drew the current boundaries in 2011 to consolidate supporters, a move that has helped them maintain control of both houses for the last eight years.

Democratic voters challenged the lines in federal court but the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June that federal judges have no role in gerrymandering cases.

Hansen and Vining introduced their bill about a week before the ruling. They said Tuesday that three Republican lawmakers have signed on as co-sponsors and people demand a hearing on the measure. Regardless, Republican leadership will almost certainly not allow the bill to become law.

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8:55 a.m.

Democratic lawmakers are planning to tout a new bill that would dramatically rework how Wisconsin draws its legislative district boundaries.

Republicans redrew the lines in 2011 to consolidate supporters, helping them maintain control of both houses since then.

Democratic voters filed a federal lawsuit in 2015 alleging the boundaries were unconstitutional but the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June that gerrymandering claims don’t belong in federal court.

Sen. Dave Hansen and Rep. Robyn Vining introduced a bill a week before the ruling that would require the Legislative Reference Bureau to draw boundaries with legislative oversight.

The bill has three Republican co-sponsors but the measure has almost no chance of becoming law. Regardless, Democrats planned a Tuesday news conference to promote the proposal.

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