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Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a rally, in Fairhope, Ala. President Donald Trump in tweets Sunday, Nov. 26, is again coming to the side of Moore by bashing the Democratic nominee Doug Jones in the Alabama Senate race. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

The case for Roy Moore

- The Washington Times

Once upon a time, even a Yellow Dog could get elected in places like Alabama — so long as he was a Democrat. That dog done run off and nowadays a Democrat can’t hardly win, even when running against an accused pedophile.

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Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

ALLEN: Marketplace fairness deception

- The Washington Times

Imagine trying to start an innovative, online small business in Virginia only to find out that the federal government mandates that you must become the tax collector for 9,600 jurisdictions — 9,599 of which are not where your business is located — and, if you get it wrong, you could be audited by the likes of California, New York or any of the other thousands of tax jurisdictions.

Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

LAMBRO: Slouching toward 2016

- The Washington Times

The 2016 presidential marathon began this week when Hillary Rodham Clinton had a very visible, heavily promoted White House lunch with President Obama, and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie threw a political punch at one of his potential rivals for the Republican nomination.

Illustration Homosexual Agenda by John Camejo for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: Tolerance in San Antonio

The First Amendment took a hit in San Antonio last week, but the Constitution is still breathing. The San Antonio City Council voted to consider a city ordinance disqualifying anyone who believes homosexual conduct is wrong from serving, ever, on a municipal board.

** FILE ** Steven Rattner, former head of the Obama administration's task force on the auto industry, delivers the keynote address on the auto bailout at the National Press Club in Washington in October 2009. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)

EDITORIAL: Bailing out Hockeytown

If it was good enough for General Motors, it's good enough for Detroit. That's the message Steve Rattner, who was President Obama's automobile-bailout czar, is peddling as a television talking head and op-ed essayist for The Wall Street Journal.

Robert James Cummiskey from Chesterfield, Missouri, a U.S. veteran who fought in the Korean War, right, carries a wreath of flowers with South Korean Army soldiers during a ceremony to mark the 60th anniversary of the Korean War at the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju near the border village of Panmunjom, the demilitarized zone that separates the two Koreas since the Korean War, north of Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday, June 24, 2010. During the war, the United States and 15 other countries fought alongside South Korea under the U.N. flag against North Korean and Chinese troops. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

EDITORIAL: The Forgotten War

More than six decades have passed since North Korean tanks rumbled across the 38th Parallel into South Korea on a quiet Sunday morning - June 25, 1950 - and set off another war just five years after the end of World War II.

** FILE ** Rep. Darrell E. Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Indulging the wastrels

House Republicans and Senate Democrats are squabbling over the Internal Revenue Service budget for next year, and a disinterested observer (if there are any) would expect them to be fighting over who could be roughest and toughest on the agency.

Illustration by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: The Obamacare canaries

Thirty-five House Democrats broke party ranks last week to vote for a Republican bill to delay the employer mandate in Obamacare. They're the canaries in the coal mine, and everyone knows what President Obama thinks of coal.

President Barack Obama speaks about the economy, Wednesday, July 24, 2013, at Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. Seeking to focus public attention on the problem he was sent to the White House to solve, Obama is making a renewed push for policies to expand the middle class, helping people he says are still treading water years after the financial meltdown. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

EDITORIAL: Christmas in July

President Obama, the retailer-in-chief. Who knew? He's making a series of speeches on the economy over the next few weeks to revive flagging interest in himself, if not the economy, stealing, sort of, from retailers who hold "Christmas in July" sales as the attention of shoppers is drawn to the attractions of summertime.