You are currently viewing the printable version of this entry, to return to the normal page, please click here.

The White House congratulates royal couple

← return to Inside Politics

Previous
Next
  • **FILE** Britain's Prince William and his bride Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, leave Westminster Abbey in London on April 29, 2011, following their wedding. (Associated Press)**FILE** Britain's Prince William and his bride Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, leave Westminster Abbey in London on April 29, 2011, following their wedding. (Associated Press)
  • Members of the media position themselves as a policeman stands guard Dec. 3, 2012, outside the King Edward VII hospital in London, where the Duchess of Cambridge has been admitted with a severe form of morning sickness. Prince William and his wife Kate are expecting their first child. (Associated Press)Members of the media position themselves as a policeman stands guard Dec. 3, 2012, outside the King Edward VII hospital in London, where the Duchess of Cambridge has been admitted with a severe form of morning sickness. Prince William and his wife Kate are expecting their first child. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** Britain's Kate Duchess of Cambridge (left) meets Nov. 28, 2012, with a young member of the public as she arrives at the Guildhall during a visit to Cambridge, England. (Associated Press)**FILE** Britain's Kate Duchess of Cambridge (left) meets Nov. 28, 2012, with a young member of the public as she arrives at the Guildhall during a visit to Cambridge, England. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** Britain's Prince William meets Nov. 28, 2012, with a young member of the public as she arrives at the Guildhall during a visit to Cambridge, England. (Associated Press)**FILE** Britain's Prince William meets Nov. 28, 2012, with a young member of the public as she arrives at the Guildhall during a visit to Cambridge, England. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** Britain's Prince William (left) and his wife Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, visit a football training pitch at St. George's Park near Burton Upon Trent in Staffordshire, England, on Oct. 9, 2012. (Associated Press)**FILE** Britain's Prince William (left) and his wife Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, visit a football training pitch at St. George's Park near Burton Upon Trent in Staffordshire, England, on Oct. 9, 2012. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** Britain's Prince William and his bride Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, leave Westminster Abbey in London on April 29, 2011, following their wedding. (Associated Press)**FILE** Britain's Prince William and his bride Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, leave Westminster Abbey in London on April 29, 2011, following their wedding. (Associated Press)
  • **FILE** Britain's Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, and his wife, Diana, take their newborn son, William, from St. Mary's Hospital in Paddington, London, on June 22, 1982. (Associated Press)**FILE** Britain's Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, and his wife, Diana, take their newborn son, William, from St. Mary's Hospital in Paddington, London, on June 22, 1982. (Associated Press)

The same day Prince William and Kate Middleton made it official and confirmed that they are expecting a child, President Obama and first lady Michelle quickly sent their congratulations to the British royal couple on the future king or queen.

“On behalf of everyone here in the White House, beginning with the president and first lady, we extend our congratulations to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on the welcome news this morning out of London that they are expecting their first child,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said at the top of his Monday briefing with reporters.

When asked if the first couple have any advice for the royal couple on parenting, Mr. Carney said he hasn’t had that conversation with them.

“But I know they both feel that having a child is one of the most wonderful parts of their lives,” he added. “So, I’m sure that will be the same for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.”

← return to Inside Politics

About the Author

Susan Crabtree

Susan Crabtree is an award-winning investigative reporter with more than 15 years of reporting experience in Washington, D.C. Her reporting about bribery, corruption and conflict-of-interest issues on Capitol Hill has led to several FBI and ethics investigations, as well as consequences for members within their caucuses and at the ballot box. Susan can be reached at scrabtree@washingtontimes.com.

Latest Stories

Latest Blog Entries

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Happening Now