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D.C. not his cup of tea

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Jason Taylor wanted no part of the Redskins’ offseason program which led to the active sacks leader’s release on Mar. 2, but Taylor is participating in the Dolphins’ organized team activities this week.

“It felt like five years, to be honest,” Taylor told reporters in South Florida about his 7-1/2 months as a Redskin.  “I don’t want to slight the Redskins in any way. “Everyone should know I’m not a left end; I’m not a five-technique left end, it’s just not what I do well.”

However, with Phillip Daniels having suffered a season-ending knee injury on the first snap of training camp, that’s where the Redskins had a need. Since right end Andre Carter was comfortable in his spot in Greg Blache’s defense, the Redskins tried plugging Taylor in for Daniels. However, the passrusher didn’t want to focus on stopping the run and a knee injury in August and emergency calf surgery in September helped limit him to just 3.5 sacks for the NFL’s fourth-ranked defense.

Taylor lost $7 million by spuring the Redskins to re-sign with the Dolphins, his employer during his stellar first 11 seasons. But the 34-year-old said it was being away from his family that prompted his decision.

“There comes a point in time where you can step away from that ego and make the right decision for yourself, whether that be business-wise or personally,” Taylor said. “If it was all about ego, I wouldn’t be here. I’d be making more money somewhere else. But it wasn’t about that.”

— David Elfin

 

 

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About the Author
David Elfin

David Elfin

David Elfin has been following Washington-area sports teams since the late 1960s. David began his journalism career at Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School, the University of Pennsylvania (B.A., history) and Syracuse University (M.S., telecommunications). He wrote for the Bulletin (Philadelphia), the Post-Standard (Syracuse) and The Washington Post before coming to The Washington Times in 1986. He has covered colleges, the Orioles ...

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