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Liberals' views on Obama's broken promises

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Even left wing members of the media, such as Michael Isikoff, are upset about President Obama’s broken promises:

 

As a senator, Barack Obama denounced the Bush administration for holding “secret energy meetings” with oil executives at the White House. But last week public-interest groups were dismayed when his own administration rejected a Freedom of Information Act request for Secret Service logs showing the identities of coal executives who had visited the White House to discuss Obama’s “clean coal” policies… . .

The hard line appears to be no accident. After Obama’s much-publicized Jan. 21 “transparency” memo, administration lawyers crafted a key directive implementing the new policy that contained a major loophole, according to FOIA experts. The directive, signed by Attorney General Eric Holder, instructed federal agencies to adopt a “presumption” of disclosure for FOIA requests. This reversal of Bush policy was intended to restore a standard set by President Clinton’s attorney general, Janet Reno. But in a little-noticed passage, the Holder memo also said the new standard applies “if practicable” for cases involving “pending litigation.” Dan Metcalfe, the former longtime chief of FOIA policy at Justice, says the passage and other “lawyerly hedges” means the Holder memo is now “astonishingly weaker” than the Reno policy. (The visitor-log request falls in this category because of a pending Bush-era lawsuit for such records.)

Administration officials say the Holder memo was drafted by senior Justice lawyers in consultation with Craig’s office. The separate standard for “pending” lawsuits was inserted because of the “burden” it would impose on officials to go “backward” and reprocess hundreds of old cases, says Melanie Ann Pustay, who now heads the FOIA office. White House spokesman Ben LaBolt says Obama “has backed up his promise” with actions including the broadcast of White House meetings on the Web. (Others cite the release of the so-called torture memos.) As for the visitor logs, LaBolt says the policy is now “under review.”

Here are some other broken promises as categorized by some on the left:

“eliminate all income taxation of seniors making less than $50,000 per year. This will eliminate taxes for 7 million seniors, saving them an average of $1,400 a year.”

“No political appointee will be able to lobby the executive branch after leaving government service during the remainder of the administration.”

State Secrets Legislation

Recognizing the Armenian Genocide

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John Lott

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