The Washington Times - December 2, 2012, 07:54PM

Israel National News is reporting Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel criticized Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyuhu for supporting Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during the last election. Mr. Emanuel made these remarks, according to INN, at the Saban Forum in Washington on Saturday:

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has criticized Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu over what is perceived as his public support of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in the last election, Channel 2 News reported on Sunday.

According to the report, Emanuel, a former White House Chief of Staff, said during a closed session at the Saban Forum in Washington that “Netanyahu supported the wrong candidate in the U.S. elections and lost.”

Emanuel also said that the White House expects that Netanyahu’s treatment of President Barack Obama will be different, especially at this time.

He said the President was not willing to accept degrading treatment by the Israeli Prime Minister. “It is inconceivable that the Prime Minister would behave the way Netanyahu is behaving,” said Emanuel, according to Channel 2.

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Managing editor of Foreign Policy magazine Blake Hounshell tweeted on Saturday:

Rahm Emanuel apparently said earlier today that Netanyahu had bet on Romney winning the election and lost.

According to New Yorker Magazine, former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert slammed Romney for going to a fundraiser in Israel during the campaign that was hosted by Romney donor Sheldon Adelson, who also owns a pro-Netanyhu newspaper: (bolding is mine)

Olmert, who has a legacy to defend and an ego to feed, was clear and alive, but even when he was right on the issues, he undermined himself with his bombast. He rightly slammed Netanyahu for giving Obama a “slap in the face” over the weekend and mocked the prime minister for pretending to be friends with Obama after being his “enemy” in the Presidential campaign just a few weeks ago.” Olmert called Mitt Romney’s campaign trip to Israel—which featured a fundraiser with Sheldon Adelson, who also owns a pro-Netanyahu newspaper—completely “inappropriate…It was made to create the impression among Jewish American voters that Romney was riding to the White House on the shoulders of Israel.” And yet he undermined himself in every self-intoxicated gesture and self-adoring rhetorical turn.

Olmert also violated the rules of the conference by dragging something that was off the record onto the record. He accurately, if generally, described how, earlier in the day, Rahm Emanuel, the mayor of Chicago and Obama’s former chief of staff, had spoken angrily and bluntly about the way Netanyahu has repeatedly betrayed the friendship of the United States, lecturing Obama in the Oval Office and now, after the U.S. had underwritten the Iron Dome anti-missile system, supported the operation in Gaza, and voted Israel’s way in the U.N., embarrassing the Obama Administration by taking punitive actions against the Palestinian Authority. After describing Emanuel’s remarks, Olmert went on to agree with them.

Additionally, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addressed the Saban Forum, where it appeared to the New Yorker Magazine writer David Remnick that she was gearing up to run for the White House in 2016:

Hillary Clinton is running for President. And the Israeli political class is a full-blown train wreck. These are two conclusions, for whatever they are worth, based on a three-day conference I attended this weekend at the annual Saban Forum, in Washington, D.C.

A word about the scene: Haim Saban, an Israeli-American media and entertainment mogul, has for the past nine years been hosting a conference, sometimes in Jerusalem, more often in Washington, focussed on the Middle East. The attendees are mainly government officials, present and former; business people; institute-niks; a few reporters. There are very few Arabs; this year the most notable exception was Salam Fayyad, the prime minister of the Palestinian Authority, though he didn’t stick around long, since the Palestinian Authority, thanks in large measure to Israel, is in grave peril, losing ground all the time to Hamas. Except for a few events, Chatham House rules obtain: meaning the official events are off the record. The presumption is that the incidental meetings are more important than the panels and speeches.