No kumbaya: Fiscal conservatives snarl at Patty and Paul's budget deal

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Despite all the kumbaya talk about compromise and optimism afoot on Capitol Hill, not everyone is happy with Patty and Paul.

We’re talking Sen. Patty Murray, Washington Democrat, and Rep. Paul Ryan, Wisconsin Republican - who have carefully maneuvered their federal budget deal through the political landscape as if it were either nitro glycerine or a nine-foot wedding cake. Their delicate agreement won approving press, and strategically timed aquiescence from Democrats and Republicans who are more wary of vexed voters than they are of those assorted cuts or increased spending.

Then there are the grassroots fiscal conservatives who will have none of it. Period.

“It’s disingenuous for Republicans to surrender the only real spending reforms accomplished under the Obama Administration, and call that a deal. Immediate spending and revenue hikes without long-term reforms to spending and entitlement programs isn’t a deal, it’s just another manufactured, govern-by-crisis shakedown,” says FreedomWorks president Matt Kibbe.

“Heritage Action cannot support a budget deal that would increase spending in the near-term for promises of woefully inadequate long-term reductions,” is the word from the grassroots arm of the Heritage Foundation.

“While imperfect, the sequester has proven to be an effective tool in forcing Congress to reduce discretionary spending,and a gimmicky, spend-now-cut-later deal will take our nation in the wrong direction,” the group says.

But there one more voice in the chorus.

“Republicans should once again stand firm in upholding the modest sequestration spending cuts that both parties agreed to for the current fiscal year,” says Tim Phillips, president of Americans for Prosperity.

“Otherwise congressional Republicans are joining liberal Democrats in breaking their word to the American people to finally begin reining in government over-spending that has left us over 17 trillion in debt.”

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