90 percent of Americans say Congress 'acts like they don't have a boss'

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Inquiring minds want to know: who do the nation’s esteemed lawmakers work for? It looks like the freewheeling group works for nobody. The vast majority of Americans - 90 percent - say elected officials in Washington behave “like they don’t have a boss.” So says a Fox New poll released Thursday. Only 7 percent overall say the lawmakers behave as if they were “employees of the American public.”

And alas. Woe is Washington as well. Another 71 percent say the federal government “is broken,” while 21 percent say the government is “just OK.” A determined 6 percent say things work “pretty well.” These are all record breaking numbers, by the way.

“In addition, the new poll shows that the belief that Washington is broken is growing. It’s up six percentage points since last year and up 13 points since 2010,” observes Fox News analyst Dana Blanton.

And there are reminders of this phenomenon along the way. Politics also tends to be allegorical, particularly when money is involved. Take that pesky budget deal that meandered and sidestepped and then bolted through both House and Senate, with some embellishment by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid along the way. It is now a symbol of bigger things, says one cryptic observer.

“This budget bill exemplifies what is wrong with Washington. Nothing is getting fixed. No important reforms are being addressed. The people get little in return except more debt, more taxes, and no change to the Obamacare disaster,” says Sen. Ted Cruz.

“The Senate majority voted to allow Sen. Reid to ignore all Republican amendments. Over and over, this is the roughshod style of leadership that characterizes this Senate and underscores why Washington badly needs to listen to the people,” the Texas Republican concludes.

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