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Majerus as a mentor to Ben Howland during the UCLA coach’s days at UC Santa Barbara and Northern Arizona.

“He was a great coach and a really, really good person” Howland said. “It’s a sad day for basketball because he was a brilliant man.”

Majerus was openly critical of Saint Louis’ affiliation in the Atlantic 10, complaining that the travel demands made it too hard to succeed academically. Yet he coached two academic All-Americans at Saint Louis, Conklin and Kevin Lisch.

Majerus was born in Milwaukee and earned a spot on the freshman team at Marquette, his hometown college. He didn’t make the varsity under McGuire, who instead hired him as an assistant coach in 1971.

Majerus‘ ties to Wisconsin included a one-year stint as assistant coach with the NBA’s Bucks in 1987-88.

“He’s done so much for basketball at Marquette and all through the state of Wisconsin,” Bucks assistant coach Jim Boylan said. “For me personally, he’s always been there. He’s one of those guys who, if you don’t see Rick for a while and when something was going wrong and you needed help, boom, he’d be there. He’d basically give you the shirt off his back, if that’s what you needed.”

Three of Majerus‘ players at Utah were first-round NBA draft picks. Keith Van Horn was No. 2 overall in 1997, Michael Doleac 12th in 1998 and Andre Miller eighth in 1999.

Saint Louis is 3-3 this season under interim coach Jim Crews, who joined the staff last season. The Billikens were picked to finish second in the Atlantic 10 but have struggled without point guard Kwamain Mitchell, sidelined probably until January with a broken foot.

“Nobody loved basketball and teaching kids more that Rick,” Crews said. “His passion for the game and the coaching profession was unparalleled.”

Majerus‘ father, Raymond, died of a heart attack at 63 in 1987. He was a former secretary-treasurer of the United Auto Workers. Majerus was devoted to his mother, Alyce, before her death in August 2011.

He was briefly married from 1987-89. He is survived by sisters Jodi and Tracy.

The portly coach was unabashed in his love of food, always quick with a restaurant recommendation for whatever town his teams were playing in.

His autobiography, “My Life On a Napkin,” came out in 2000.

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AP Sports Writer Beth Harris in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

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