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A separate tour is available for the Olympic ski-jumping complex, and Whiteface Mountain is open for skiing during the winter. Lake Placid also hosts an Olympic museum downtown.

BERLIN AND MUNICH, GERMANY

Germany hosted two notorious games: The 1936 Berlin Olympics, which Adolf Hitler tried to turn into a showcase of Aryan supremacy, and the 1972 Munich Olympics, married by a hostage crisis that left 11 Israeli athletes dead.

You see the majestic Olympic Gate — two towers holding up the Olympic rings — as you approach Olympiastadion Berlin. Next to the stadium are the tower and parade grounds used by the Nazis for military and political ceremonies.

A tour takes you to the stands overlooking the track area where Owens and other athletes competed. You can see the unlit cauldron at one end of the stadium. You also can see the balcony from which Hitler watched the games, though it was shortened after World War II as part of de-Nazification efforts.

Sign up for the Berlin Marathon in September, and you may get to run on the track the morning before the race. It’s not the original track surface, though.

Many of Munich’s events took place at Olympiapark. The main stadium was used for the opening and closing ceremonies, track and field and soccer. With a tour, you get to walk on the track.

The tour also takes you to a VIP lounge filled with Olympic artifacts such as torches from past games and shoes worn by some of the athletes, including Kenya’s Kipchoge Keino, who won gold in the 3,000-meter steeplechase in 1972. A wall display of key moments includes a newspaper headline on the massacre.

The athletes’ village where the terrorism acts took place is still around, used mostly for offices and housing these days. Visits are discouraged. Instead, check out a memorial at the Olympic park.

BEIJING, CHINA

Beijing’s iconic “Bird’s Nest” and “Water Cube” facilities are open to visitors. The National Stadium was the site of the opening and closing ceremonies, track and field events and soccer and is notable for its architecture — steel “twigs” on the outside form a massive, curving nest.

The National Aquatics Center, where Michael Phelps won eight golds in 2008, is dubbed the Water Cube for its blue, bubblelike exterior. It’s a water park these days.