- Associated Press - Wednesday, November 7, 2012

NEW YORK (AP) — The nor’easter, as promised, brought gusting winds, rain, snow and the threat of flooding. It menaced travelers with icy roads, snarled the Long Island Rail Road and knocked out power to people who had only recently gotten it back after Superstorm Sandy.

But for the weary, relief is on the way. Joey Picca, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, says the unwelcome snow and high winds are slowly moving out of the New York City area. Commuters, though, may have to brave some lingering snowfall Thursday morning.

Faced with more bad weather, some in the storm-ravaged Northeast just shrugged, dug in and stayed put.

Elena McDonnell didn’t waste energy worrying about the newest storm, not after living through Sandy last week and still without power in her Staten Island home.


“It isn’t scary at all,” the 42-year-old said. “This is nothing.”

Under ordinary circumstances, a storm of this sort wouldn’t be a big deal. But large swaths of the landscape were still an open wound, with the electrical system highly fragile and many of Sandy’s victims still mucking out their homes and cars and shivering in the deepening cold. As the storm picked up in intensity Wednesday evening, lights started flickering off again.

Mark L. Fendrick, of Staten Island, shared his frustration with others on Twitter Wednesday night, saying, “My son had just got his power back 2 days ago now along comes this nor’easter and it’s out again.”

Residents from Connecticut to Rhode Island generally got slammed with 3 to 6 inches of snow on Wednesday. Worcester, Mass., had a whopping 8 inches of snow, although a number of other communities threatened to exceed that accumulation.

Meteorologist Frank Nocera says all is not lost: temperatures over the next couple of days will be in the 50s in southern New England, and on Sunday it could edge into the 60s.

In New York and New Jersey, rain and 60 mph wind gusts Wednesday evening and overnight carried the potential to swamp homes again, topple trees wrenched loose by Sandy, and erase some of the hard-won progress made in restoring power to millions of customers.

“I am waiting for the locusts and pestilence next,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said. “We may take a setback in the next 24 hours.”

Ahead of the storm, public works crews in New Jersey built up dunes to protect the stripped and battered coast, and new evacuations were ordered in a number of communities already emptied by Sandy. New shelters opened.

Not everybody was hunkering down.

Katie Wilford was leaving her Brick Township home near Barnegat Bay as the nor’easter approached. She bundled her sons Nick, 14, and Matthew, 10, into the minivan in search of an open motel.

“It’s a little overwhelming,” she said. “I can’t believe we’re doing this again. We’re going on Day 10 with no power. That’s a long time. I just want the sun to come out and things to be normal again.”

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