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Phyllis Schlafly: Still seeking the conservative choice, not an echo

Phyllis Schlafly: Still seeking the conservative choice, not an echo is an Advertising Supplement featuring news and commentary from Ben Carson, David Keene, Timothy Head, Ed Martin, Deborah Simmons and Ralph Z. Hallow.

Conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly says reviving a strong, self-sufficient family culture is the only way out of the nation's financial mess. (Associated Press)

Phyllis Schlafly at 90: Still pushing conservative ideals, battling Republican establishment

By Cheryl Wetzstein - The Washington Times

"I've had a fun life." So says Phyllis Schlafly, the prolific writer, speaker and conservative thinker who, at age 90, is still fighting to comfort the afflicted conservative while afflicting the comfortable. Especially the kingmakers. Published February 23, 2015

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'Longevity plus consistency equals great leadership'

Every day, year after year, Phyllis Schlafly leads her Eagle Forum and, by extension, "the conservative movement." Trusted for her judgment and instincts, Phyllis is a go-to leader for conservatives in and out of public life. Already this year, she is playing a key role in the 2016 presidential election with her updated book A Choice Not An Echo which describes how the fight is yet again between the "kingmakers" and the conservative grassroots.

Phyllis Schlafly Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Applauding an elegant conservative

Recently, I was temporarily placed on the Southern Poverty Law Center's watch list for extremism simply because I vocally support traditional marriage. I remember thinking: When did advocating for lifelong love between one man and one woman become a hate crime? Fortunately, the group saw the folly of its ways and apologized, removing me from the list.

A founding mother of the conservative movement

What can one say about my good friend Phyllis Schlafly. I have known her for more than 30 years and have marveled at her courage and commitment to issues in which she believes.

When Phyllis Schlafly went to Berkeley

Phyllis Schlafly went into the belly of the beast, the University of California Berkeley, six years ago this month to give a lecture on the failures of the modern-day feminist movement.

Phyllis Schlafly of Alton, Ill., in Chicago on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 1977, says that she won?t seek the U.S. Senate seat held by Charles H. Percy, also a Republican, in the March 21 primary. Mrs. Schlafly, allied with several conservative causes, conducted the press conference outdoors in Chicago?s subfreezing weather. (AP Photo)

The queen of the conservative movement

- The Washington Times

As conservatives gather this week to celebrate Phyllis Schlafly, we should take a moment to reflect on the impact this truly remarkable woman has had and is continuing to have on the country, the Republican Party and the conservative movement.

A prolific author

Over her storied career, Phyllis Schlafly has written a total of 26 books with far-reaching impact, from making the case for Barry Goldwater's 1964 campaign to counterpunching feminist efforts to attack stay-at-home mothers. Here they are:

An instigator like no other

The challenge of history is to recover the past and introduce it to the present. So says American historian David Thelen. If that is true, let us be in the business of recovery and introduction.

A pioneer for women in law, and all things conservative

My first awareness of Phyllis Schlafly was more than 40 years ago, when I was an undergraduate student at the University of Oklahoma. I was cutting my political teeth and was appointed as a student member of a campus-wide committee to study salary inequities between male and female faculty members. That assignment lead to my involvement (apologies for being a wayward youth...) in the effort to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment in Oklahoma.