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Matt Mackowiak

Matt Mackowiak

Matt Mackowiak is an Austin and Washington, DC-based political and communications consultant and President of Potomac Strategy Group. He has served in senior roles for two U.S. Senators and a Governor, in the Bush administration.  Matt appears regularly on MSNBC, Fox News, CNN, CNBC, CBC-TV, and the BBC. From 2007-2009 Matt served as Press Secretary to U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX), the fourth highest ranking member of the Republican Leadership, and from 2005-2007 he served in the same role for three-term former U.S. Senator Conrad Burns (R-MT).

Latest Podcast Episodes of Matt Mackowiak's Mack On Politics

Articles by Matt Mackowiak

Democratic candidate for 6th congressional district Jon Ossoff, left, waves to the crowd while stepping offstage with his fiancee Alisha Kramer after conceding to Republican Karen Handel at his election night party in Atlanta, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

A special election that will truly prove special

I freely admit that we can spend far too much time analyzing the results of one special election, occurring in a particular district, with two particular candidates, held on a particular day more than 16 months from the 2018 midterms. Published June 21, 2017

A Capitol Hill Police officer stands his post at the entrance to the House of Representatives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, after House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others, were injured in a shooting during a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Rethinking questions of security after ball field shooting

Short of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and its threat to the U.S. Capitol and the Pentagon, it is hard to recall a time in our recent history when a large group of elected officials were targeted for assassination. Published June 14, 2017

James B. Comey's firing will have immediate and long-term ramifications. (Associated Press)

As questions mount, the White House could use a few good answers

President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James B. Comey has set in motion a series of events that present the most serious threat to his presidency yet. We can all speculate where we would be had Mr. Trump not decided to dismiss the FBI director, but the simple fact is that the White House has lost the ability to control where this story goes from here. Published May 17, 2017

FILE - In this April 20, 2017 file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in New York. Clinton said Tuesday, May 2, 2017, that she's taking responsibility for her 2016 election loss but believes misogyny, Russian interference and questionable decisions by the FBI also influenced the outcome. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)

Clinton seeks scapegoats for her 2016 debacle

On Tuesday, while being interviewed by Christiane Amanpour at a "Women for Women" event in New York, former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton cast specific, targeted and direct blame at everyone, but herself, for her shocking election loss in November. Published May 3, 2017

Democrats can't chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party's most visible figures aren't exactly fresh faces. Published April 26, 2017

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, then-President-elect Donald Trump shakes hands with Todd Ricketts at Trump's National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Ricketts, President Donald Trump's pick for deputy commerce secretary has withdrawn from consideration.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Too early to panic, but not too early for GOP to be concerned

We are not even 100 days into the Trump presidency, and already journalists and political pundits are desperately looking for clues as to how the midterm elections will turn out 19 months from now. Let's all take a deep breath. Published April 19, 2017

President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump's Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday's House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible. Published March 22, 2017

Democrats appear to be missing in action as President Trump and congressional Republicans forge ahead on a health care fix. (Associated Press/File)

Democrats fiddle while Obamacare burns and crashes

I have seen no major Democratic legislation filed this Congress to "fix" Obamacare. Nothing to address rising costs, or the declining quality of coverage, or the increasing lack of choice in the market. Published March 15, 2017

President Trump

Hitting some turbulence, it's time for President Trump to adapt

Republicans have unified control in Washington. This opportunity may last only two years, but if they get their act together, it can last far beyond that on Capitol Hill. Merging new staff with a loyal campaign team is always difficult -- especially given the stress of working in the West Wing. Published March 8, 2017

President Trump gestures toward Democrats while addressing a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. (Associated Press)

Taking the road less traveled, orator Trump charts the way forward

After a roller-coaster ride during his first six weeks in office, President Trump faced a choice: Take another victory lap with a narrow speech tailored to his base, or try something radically different. Mr. Trump took the road less traveled, and the benefit from his decision will be significant. Published March 1, 2017

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., left, and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of N.Y., depart Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Feb. 3, 2017, after lawmakers gathered for a predawn vote to advance the nomination of Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) **FILE**

Swinging and missing, Democrats strike out in fighting Trump

With 48 senators, just three shy of a majority, exactly what have Democrats accomplished in the first 30 days of the Trump presidency? I just performed a rough calculation and here's what I get: Absolutely nothing. Published February 8, 2017