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Another day, another investigation

Gone are the days when the losers went home after an election, to nurse their wounds, catalog their mistakes, and get ready for another round. Now an election is never over, and special prosecutors and their regiments of lawyers, egged on by the media, continue the campaign by "other means." Published June 24, 2017

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday, June 23, 2017. European Union leaders met in Brussels on the final day of their two-day summit to focus on ways to stop migrants crossing the Mediterranean and how to uphold free trade while preventing dumping on Europe's markets. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)

Angela Merkel's welcome mat

Only the hard-hearted would slam the door against a refugee. Their stories are heart-breaking and their courage in seeking a better life in a new home is remarkable. Nevertheless, refugees in uncontrolled number are a headache for everyone. Germany, held up as a nation with a big heart, is learning the cost of Angela Merkel's big heart. More than a million refugees have arrived since 2015. Published June 24, 2017

Saudi Arabia moving in right direction

Saudi Arabia's King Salman recently issued a royal decree, changing the name of the Saudi Bureau of Investigation and Public Prosecution to the more concise Public Prosecution. He also relieved Prince Mohammed bin Nayef of his role as minister of the interior and overseer of criminal investigations. Public prosecution now reports directly to King Salman, which will have a huge impact on Saudi Arabia's legal system. Published June 24, 2017

Why no one trusts mainstream news

Last Wednesday I heard multiple radio commercials from the AARP hysterically attacking the Senate's health-care bill and urging West Virginia voters to call Sen. Shelley Moore Capito and pressure her to oppose the bill. This morning, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was still on the floor of the Senate making his very first public statements about the bill, many mainstream-media outlets were publicizing a poll in which large numbers of Americans oppose the bill. Published June 24, 2017

Now they want to read

I find it laughable that the Democratic congressional members are claiming no one has had time to read or study the 1,000-page, Republican-sponsored Obamacare modification. Yet I seem to remember that in 2010, then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Congress to pass President Obama's 2,000-page health-care act so that Congress and all of America could "find out what's in it " Published June 22, 2017

No one-party rule in Taiwan

Numerous social media accounts in Taiwan have been suspended for the 'crime' of criticizing Taiwan's government. The Taiwanese news media tend to self-regulate in order to avoid rejection of license renewal, and they hesitate to report protests or other anti-government-related events. Published June 22, 2017

In this image from video provided by C-SPAN, Wall Street Journal reporter Jay Solomon is interview on the C-SPAN program Washington Journal on Sept. 23, 2014 in Washington. The Wall Street Journal on June 21, 2017, fired Solomon after evidence emerged about his involvement in prospective business deals, including one involving arms sales to foreign governments, with an international businessman who was one of his key sources. Solomon was offered a 10 percent stake in a fledgling company, Denx LLC, by Farhad Azima, an Iranian-born aviation magnate who ferried weapons for the CIA. It was not clear whether Solomon ever received money or formally accepted a stake in the company. Solomon did not immediately comment. (C-SPAN via AP)

Upholding a media standard

Newspaper reporters aren't expected to be purer than Caesar's wife (not even the wife of a Julius Caesar passing as Donald Trump), but a reporter who doesn't measure up to his newspaper's established ethical standards can expect to pay for it. Published June 22, 2017

Sunshine on the wall

Congressional Democrats love to spend money on solar power and infrastructure projects, and President Trump has given them something to think about -- using the sun to power and pay for his border wall. Published June 22, 2017

Terrorists come in all shapes, shades

The recent shooting at a Republican congressional baseball practice in Alexandria attests to the terrifying reality that no one, not even our highest elected officials, is safe from the disturbing nationwide increase in violent acts. Particularly troubling is that the shooter, James Hodgkinson, appears to have made a calculated attempt to inculcate fear with his fierce opposition to President Trump and the GOP. Published June 22, 2017

Vote for values

I once had an assignment with the United Nations in which I worked in Egypt with officers from the Soviet Union and other nations. This was during the Cold War years, with Leonid Brezhnev in power. As a young U.S. Navy lieutenant, the job was exciting in certain ways. I learned different things through the relationships I made, but some things stayed with me for life. One has been that people, no matter where they're from, all have the same basic needs. All have the need for sustenance, family and shelter. All seek to be content. All feel emotions, both good and bad. All desire to live life to best of their ability. The representatives from the Soviet Union, along with the other nations, were people with the same basic needs as us Americans. Published June 21, 2017

Democratic candidate for 6th Congressional District Jon Ossoff, left, concedes to Republican Karen Handel while joined by his fiancee Alisha Kramer at his election night party in Atlanta, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

The bad day for the Democrats

The morning after an election is always a time for poring over the entrails of the campaign, and Wednesday the Democrats spent the whole day trying to figure out how they could spend $25 million on a special election in Georgia, and still lose. Published June 21, 2017

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2017 file photo, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown delivers her inaugural speech to Oregon legislators in the Capitol House chambers in Salem, Ore. A $670 million health care tax package has passed the Oregon Legislature and now heads to Gov. Kate Brown, providing enough funds over the next two years to prevent Medicaid recipients from losing health care and avoid closing a newly-built psychiatric hospital with hundreds of patients. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, file)

Getting to the heart of health care

It's still there. Like chewing gum stuck to the bottom of a shoe, Obamacare refuses to let go. No other Republican promise made over the past eight years, repeated endlessly during 2016 presidential election campaign, was more popular than the assurance that Barack Obama's namesake legislation would expire with his term of office. Six months into Donald Trump's presidency, the promise remains unredeemed. That may soon change. With the hammer of repeal and replacement about to drop, two words of advice: Don't miss. Published June 21, 2017

Pelosi needs reality check

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has once again demonstrated an unbridled level of buffoonery. Her recent proclamation that the hateful and violent incidents we see today can be traced back to the 1990s during the Clinton administration and the attacks by conservatives and Republicans on Bill and Hillary is simply ludicrous and unfounded ("Pelosi: 'Outrageous' for Republicans to blame Democrats for heated rhetoric," Web, June 15). Published June 20, 2017

Immigrants infuse U.S. with life

Is America still the last, best hope for mankind? That status could have slipped some on our watch (see Iraq, deficit spending). And we have been a bit stupid (see Citizens United, concealed carry, extended ammo clips). Well, our nation was founded on money and violence (see slavery, native genocide). But remember also the Civil War, women's suffrage, civil rights and gay rights, and remember America's extraordinary labor-saving and Published June 20, 2017

Justice for Otto Warmbier

I can only hope that retribution for the egregious death of Otto Warmbier is swift and sure. This horrible tragedy resulted from no more than a college prank, leading to the death of a vibrant, loving and intelligent young man. I can only imagine the suffering endured by his family, and was brought to tears by their description of the peace that had come over his face, even when he was in a coma, as he realized that at last he was home. Published June 20, 2017

FILE - In this June 13, 2013 file photo, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trumps closest allies are attacking the integrity of those involved in the widening probe of Russian interference in the U.S. election, accusing special counsel Mueller of driving a biased investigation. And Trump himself took aim at the senior Justice Department official responsible for appointing Mueller, accusing him on Twitter of leading a Witch Hunt.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

No stacking the deck

Robert Mueller III has always got high marks for probity, integrity and honesty, but as a Washington lawyer of considerable talent he should know that sometimes it's the perception that counts most. Mr. Mueller is asking a skeptical capital to take too much on faith. Published June 20, 2017

FILE - In this June 13, 2017 file photo, House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. speaks at Republican National Committee Headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Liberal groups resistant to Republican policies say they have no plans to change their tactics or approach after a gunman apparently driven by his hatred of President Donald Trump opened fire at a GOP baseball practice, grievously injuring a top Republican congressman and several others. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Sitting ducks in Congress

Sitting members of Congress should not be sitting ducks. Last week's shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise and several Republican staff members at a baseball field in suburban Washington revealed them to be exactly that. They can thank the District of Columbia's excessive and spiteful firearms restrictions. Laws hindering their ability to carry a concealed weapon should be relaxed to enable members of Congress and other law-abiding Washingtonians to protect themselves. Published June 20, 2017

Return to private-sector insurance

Obamacare, Ryancare, McConnellcare, etc., are all disasters for the quality and expense of medical care in America. The solution is returning 80 percent of Americans to private-sector insurance in a nationwide marketplace. As insurance companies compete for customers, we will see the choices multiply. Federal mandates will be eliminated and the states will be encouraged to eliminate mandates as well. Published June 19, 2017

Congress wasting taxpayer money

As sad as it was, last week's deliberate shooting of members of the GOP probably surprised few people. The Republican Party in particular decries the failings of one federal agency and its employees after another. Yet almost every day the GOP and Democrats alike throw at each other the politics of immature obstruction, insults and finger-pointing. Either party passing a bill but not getting it to the president's desk is not success, it is legislative failure. Published June 19, 2017

FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, vials filled with samples of marijuana are arranged at the Blum medical marijuana dispensary, in Reno, Nev. Nevada's marijuana regulators are working furiously to launch recreational sales on July 1, a fast-approaching deadline that could hinge on a court deciding whether the powerful liquor industry should be guaranteed a piece of the pot pie before tourists and residents can light up. Lawyers for the liquor industry, marijuana retailers and the state are facing a judge Monday, June 19, 2017, to argue whether Nevada has the authority to issue marijuana distribution licenses to anyone besides alcohol distributors. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File)

Disappointment in Potlandia

Curing cancer and eliminating heart disease would be nice, but what the government -- federal, state and local -- would like most of all is a new source of revenue, i.e., something new to tax. Published June 19, 2017