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THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Articles by THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Refuse 'game show' presidency

Those who will vote for Hillary Rodham Clinton for president in 2016 are the same who voted twice for the current White House resident. That Mrs. Clinton is even on the political scene for consideration of the top position in our federal government says much of the present condition of politics and the electorate. If we are to succeed in righting the ship it will come down to us, the American people. Published April 16, 2015

Peace through perseverance

In order to foster regional peace and stability, economic prosperity and sustainable transit by commercial container ships, as well as to seek out a path to coexistence and mutual prosperity, Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou has proposed a peace initiative that provides a viable empirical model for peaceful resolution of territorial disputes in the South China Sea ("Carter chides China over approach to territorial disputes," Web, April 10). Published April 16, 2015


Volunteers pass through the first full body scanner, which uses backscatter technology, at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago on March 10, 2010. Those airport scanners with their all-too revealing body images will soon be going away. The Transportation Security Administration says the X-ray scanners will be gone by June 2013 because the company that makes them can't fix the privacy issues. (Associated Press)

Hanky-panky in the security line

When the Transportation Security Administration installed full-body scanners several years ago the ACLU, privacy advocates and many passengers sounded warnings that this invited sexual harassment, voyeurism and maybe even sexual adventuring. The government routinely dismissed the complaints as "unfounded" and even "paranoid." Would your government do anything like that? "Full-body pat-downs" followed for passengers who raised an alarm going through the scanners. Published April 16, 2015

Hillary Rodham Clinton made an unannounced pit stop Monday at a Chipotle outside Toledo. It would have gone completely unnoticed if not for a Clinton campaign aide tipping off The New York Times, which contacted the restaurant and obtained security camera footage of Mrs. Clinton wearing sunglasses while waiting in line for a burrito bowl. (Associated Press)

A first test on the trail

If Hillary Clinton can't stage-manage ordering lunch in an Iowa diner, with aides at hand, how can she manage a presidential campaign? This is the question worried Democrats are asking each other after Mrs. Clinton's campaign ventured into the weeds in the Midwest, demonstrating that the feminists and a noisy claque of like-minded allies may be "ready for Hillary," but she does not seem to be ready to persuade skeptical voters that she's ready for them. Published April 16, 2015

Menendez corruption only problem now?

Why has The Washington Times not covered in more detail the recent charges against Sen. Robert Menendez, New Jersey Democrat (New Jersey Sen. Menendez to face federal corruption charges: report," Web, March 6)? The Department of Justice has accused Mr. Menendez of corruption (i.e., accepting free airplane rides and other gifts from an old friend who needed help in securing some federal contracts). Published April 15, 2015

Iran deal bad all around

There is much to be concerned about when a tentative agreement reached by the P5+1 powers, at the urging of President Obama, allows retention of the most potent weapons Iran has. First, there is no limit on the terrorist actions of Iran, nor are there limits on its support of its involved allies, including Hezbollah, Hamas, Syria and the rebels in Yemen and Bahrain. Published April 15, 2015

Contained fighting could up U.S. security

Due to indecision by the Obama White House to support moderate Sunni rebels in Syria, Islamic terrorists in Syria (the so-called Islamic State) were able to reposition forces and attack the Iraqi army, which folded and abandoned its U.S. equipment, including many Humvees and 155-millimeter guns. Published April 15, 2015

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, following a Senate policy luncheon. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Choking on gall and wormwood

Harry Reid is having shrinking pains, choking on a diet of gall and wormwood. He is not dealing well with the events of last November, when he lost the comfort and prominence of the Senate. The Senate's longtime Democratic leader revealed to an interviewer this week how the not-so-sweet mystery of life continues to elude him. He cannot understand why people don't like him. He thinks it's "unfortunate." Published April 15, 2015

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy holds up a pen before signing new emission guidelines during an announcement of a plan to cut carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030, Monday, June 2, 2014, at EPA headquarters in Washington.  In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday that cuts carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third over the next 15 years, but pushes the deadline for some states to comply until long after President Barack Obama leaves office. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Halting the EPA's power grab

America is the land of the free, but environmentalists are determined to rule the air. The Environmental Protection Agency persists with expensive and unnecessary schemes to regulate harmless carbon dioxide — the stuff we and the plants breathe — and several energy companies and coal-producing states are making a final appeal to the courts to halt a deliberate attempt to seize authority the EPA was never meant to have. Published April 15, 2015

Hold Clinton accountable

As an independent voter, I voted for Bill Clinton the second time around. Back then I spoke out against the Republicans for unmercifully going after him for his sexual involvement with a White House intern. From my perspective the attacks were a detriment to the seat of the presidency and made the entire country look like a soap opera in the eyes of the world. That brings me to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Published April 14, 2015

Tsarnaev deserves death

That Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts was a foregone conclusion, about as much of a surprise as a harsh northeastern winter ("Dzhokhar Tsarnaev guilty on all 30 counts in marathon bombing, faces death penalty," Web, April 8). Published April 14, 2015

Austin Bryant celebrates his victory at tether ball with Hogan Conder during recess at Marlin Elementary School in Bloomington, Ind.

When nanny runs amok

In the beginning there were good parents and bad parents. Then came "deadbeat dads," who didn't support their children. "Soccer moms" were (mostly suburban) mothers who spent a good part of their day getting their children to the playing fields on time. Then "helicopter parents" arrived, hovering over everything their kids did. Published April 14, 2015

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton takes notes during a roundtable with educators and students at the Kirkwood Community College's Jones County Regional Center, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in Monticello, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Adventures in the Scooby van

The silly season begins, when nobody follows presidential politics but the men and women of press and tube who are paid to do it. Still, on her first venture out of the shadows we learned several substantial things about "the new Hillary." She stopped at a Chipotle on the highway south of Toledo, en route to Iowa, and nobody recognized her behind a pair of dark sunglasses. She lunched on a chicken burrito bowl (with guacamole) and when she pulled into her hotel in Pittsburgh she was not hungry for further fine dining, and ordered "Scooby snacks" from the room-service menu. She's traveling in an "upgraded" Chevrolet van, "approved" by the Secret Service, christened "the Scooby van." Published April 14, 2015

Say no to 'Big Sister' Clinton

Maybe it's just the conservative in me, but when I heard Hillary Rodham Clinton say that "Everyday Americans need a champion, and I want to be that champion so you can do more than just get by — you can get ahead and stay ahead," my first thought was "Big government" ("Hillary Clinton announces 2016 bid, says she's running for 'everyday Americans,' April 12). Published April 13, 2015

What about Krajina Serbs?

It's all very well for Pope Francis to recognize the Ottoman genocide of Armenians, but what about Pius XII's silence regarding events across the Adriatic in wartime greater Croatia ("Pope recalls slaughter of Armenians in 'first genocide of the 20th century,'" Web, April 12)? Hundreds of thousands of civilian Serbs in Croatia and Bosnia were slaughtered by the Croatian Ustasha regime. Their only political ambition was to lie low given that Serbia proper was under brutal German occupation and their only crime was their national and religious identity. Published April 13, 2015

Hillary Rodham Clinton has attempted to allay the furor over her exclusive use of a private email account hosted on a private server in her home for conducting official business as secretary of state, a practice that may have violated federal open records laws. (Associated Press)

Hillary to the rescue

Hillary Rodham Clinton is not the inevitable president, but she was clearly the inevitable candidate. For the party, she's what's available, and she's a meal ticket for the clutch of retreads, has-beens and hangers-on from a checkered past, and now she wants to be the 67-year-old leader of a youth movement in a Democratic Party reeling and disillusioned in the wake of suffering blowouts in consecutive congressional elections. Her appeal, such as it is, is an unusual one: "I ain't much, but I'm all you've got." Published April 13, 2015

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei took issues with key points on the framework of a nuclear deal including sanction relief and inspector access. (Associated Press)

Devilish nuclear details

The devil is often in the details of a deal, but the devil lies in the West's negotiators themselves as they attempt to make a deal with Iran. We have the word of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, supreme leader of Iran, on that. He launched such a fusillade of verbal rockets against the Obama administration that the newly signed "framework" for a deal is scorched and blackened. If there was doubt that Iran would act in good faith in talks to shut down its nuclear weapons program, there is none now. Published April 13, 2015

Still a 'community organizer' at heart

We elected President Obama as a statesman and leader. We didn't expect him to be a psychoanalyst and a mock priest. But on April 5 he told Thomas Friedman of The New York Times, "I think the biggest threats that they face may not be coming from Iran invading ... . It's going to be from dissatisfaction inside their own countries." So maniacs are driving themselves to decapitations and crucifixions? Published April 12, 2015

Base Russia policy on current reality

I read with interest the piece reminiscing over the meeting of American and Soviet forces on the Elbe in 1945 ("When Americans and Soviets were comrades-in-arms," Web, April 2). Instead of looking at that meeting of our forces as a discrete, static event, some historical context may be useful. Perhaps if the Soviets had not invaded Poland with Germany and proceeded to provide material support to the Nazi war machine, assisting Hitler in avoiding the British naval blockade, such a historic meeting may never have been necessary. Published April 12, 2015