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THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Articles by THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Impose SOTU rules now

Two recent op-eds about the president's State of the Union speech ("The president's fictional record," Web, Jan. 26 and "When politics defies reality," Web, Jan. 27) highlight the need for a revised State of the Union format. Structure needs to be imposed on these speeches before they descend further into balloon releases. Published January 29, 2015

The South Lawn of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Two bites out of the economy

Taxes take a bite out of the economy, but regulations take a bigger one. Congress has surrendered much of its lawmaking authority to the president and a growing swarm of unelected bureaucrats, and regulations are growing faster than ever. The Obama administration thinks this is the way to run an economy. It's actually the way to cripple it. Published January 29, 2015

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The Hillary tapes

War is a terrible thing, as everyone who has ever been in one can testify, but war can tempt a president, and sometimes merely someone with the itch to be a president, as a way to burnish a warrior credential. Published January 29, 2015

Cherry-picking temperature data?

The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) now states that 2014 was the hottest year on record. They proclaimed this back on January 16. NOAA actually lists three sets of global temperature data, one based on a network of surface thermometers and two based on satellite readings. The two satellite data sets show 2014 as being third and sixth. Moreover, the thermometers ranked 2014 only 0.04 degrees Celsius ahead of the previous hottest year on record, which is (barely) within their nominal margin of measurement error of 0.05 degrees Celsius. Published January 28, 2015

Call ‘BDS’ groups what they are

The Israel-delegitimization efforts by groups such as the boycott-oriented BDS organization represent not only anti-Israel but anti-Semitic actions ("Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel," Web, Jan. 22). Evidently these same groups hope to soften up Israel and turn world opinion against that democratic nation, allowing Iran with its nuclear and long-range missile program to dispose of Israel and its six million Jews. Published January 28, 2015

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is traveling the country now as an evangelist for expansion, urging other governors to follow his lead. (AP Photo/James Nord)

John Kasich’s medicine show

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio was one of several Republican governors who agreed in 2013 to accept a grant of federal money under Obamacare to expand his state's Medicaid services. The temporary grant of $2.6 billion, accepted over protests from his legislature, expires this year and Mr. Kasich now wants the legislature to approve taking more Obamacare subsidies to continue to pay for the expansion. Published January 28, 2015

Hillary Rodham Clinton

The baggage of Benghazi

Politics is a rough game. There's no rule that says you can't rough the passer or avoid making hits to the head. There's not even a rule that says it's unfair to take a dispassionate look at the record of a candidate who offers himself — or herself — for president of the United States. This includes a thorough baggage search. Published January 28, 2015

Tovuz, the land of antiquity and natural beauty

The region draws its name from two of the ancient Turkish tribes that settled there: the Tovuz and the Ovuz. Its buildings and monuments preserve some of the region's rich culture and history, dating to medieval times. Published January 28, 2015

Azerbaijan's rich history with Jewish settlers opened door to Israel alliance

If one wonders how the majority Muslim country of Azerbaijan came to such a rich alliance with Israel today, one need look no further than the Red Village, a tiny river conclave in the mountainous region of Quba. There, for centuries, a Jewish community has thrived amid a Muslim population. Published January 28, 2015

Shahdag: The skiing gem of Azerbaijan

The complex is less than 20 miles north of the town of Gusar, about 8,200 feet above sea level. Temperatures are perfect for skiing, bottoming out around 34 degrees on winter nights and topping out at 68 degrees during the summer days. Published January 28, 2015

Turner champions Azerbaijan as key to geopolitical stability

Rep. Michael R. Turner, R-Ohio, has been one of the most cogent voices on Capitol Hill in educating his colleagues about the importance of Azerbaijan as a strategic U.S. ally. And as chairman of the U.S. Delegation to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Parliamentary Assembly, his voice is closely heeded. Published January 28, 2015

America's new ambassador to Azerbaijan: Robert F. Cekuta

Shortly before leaving for holiday recess, the U.S. Senate approved the nomination of Robert F. Cekuta, a career foreign service diplomat with expertise in international energy issues, to be the new American ambassador to the Republic of Azerbaijan. Published January 28, 2015

Fight Boko Haram with mutual interests

About the same time as the Paris massacre at Charlie Hebdo, Boko Haram was murdering hundreds, perhaps thousands of innocents in the town of Baga in northeastern Nigeria. Jihadists in Nigeria have brutally targeted innocents throughout the region. But make no mistake; the root cause has little to do with religion. We must confront the material realities of the discontent. This is a war that will never end, and consequently we cannot win if we do not grasp the underlying causes. Ideas, no matter how perverse, do not come with consume-by dates. Published January 27, 2015

Make ‘drug-free’ more than slogan

The Berlin Wall divided the city of Berlin into east and west. As such it restricted progress of the city. Like the Berlin Wall, a wall of denial about employee drug use exists in local school systems. Also like the Berlin Wall, drug use restricts progress. However, unlike the Berlin Wall which was constructed of stone, the wall in the local school systems is constructed of marijuana, cocaine and other drugs. Published January 27, 2015

A pedestrian walks in the middle of Seventh Avenue in Times Square, New York, early Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The Great Blizzard of ’15

Nothing is more tempting to television's talking heads than exaggerating an approaching doomsday of blizzards, droughts, hurricanes, traffic jams, abortion rallies and other disasters, and nothing is riskier for politicians. What was hyped as the Great Blizzard of '15 turned out to be the Usual Snowfall of '15, and now the politicians are squirming under an avalanche of second-guessing. Published January 27, 2015

A herd of musk ox graze in an area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, known as Area 1002, in this undated file photo. (AP Photo/Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, File)

Playing oil field politics

Americans are back in the automobile showrooms looking for big cars and SUVs, grooving on size, bells and whistles again. The falling price of gasoline has enabled customers to buy what they want, and what they want is often the Belchfire 8 they can afford to drive again (and trying with difficulty to maneuver through narrow streets in the older cities). The falling gasoline prices have put hundreds of dollars in the pockets of Americans, and that's all to the good. Published January 27, 2015