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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

President Obama arrives to speak during a nationally televised address from the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jim Bourg, Pool)

Obama puts the cat among the pigeons

Barack Obama put the cat among the pigeons Thursday night, but he may be surprised by how big that cat could get, and with it a big cat's appetite for more than pigeons. Published November 20, 2014

Shootout on Potomac looms over immigration amnesty

This is the week Washington has been waiting for. Barack Obama is expected to send up his executive amnesty for 5 million illegal aliens and double-dog dare the Republicans to do anything about it. Published November 17, 2014

Barry Goldwater greets an Indianapolis crowd during a campaign tour in Oct. 1964. (AP Photo

Good for a story, and good for the conscience

Barry Goldwater was the favorite candidate of every correspondent who appreciated a good story. I covered his 1964 presidential campaign for the old National Observer, the late, great Dow Jones newsweekly, and he never let us down. He was blunt, irreverent and unpredictable, often mocking the press caricature of him as a reckless gunslinger from the Old West. He was great copy. Published November 17, 2014

Thomas "Mack" McLarty         Associated Press photo

Democrats working through the five stages of grief, still in denial

The Democrats are still trying to get through the famous five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. They're still stuck on denial. How could such a thing happen when we're so wise, so good, so compassionate, so sincere? Published November 13, 2014

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., speaks to reporters, surrounded by supporters, in front of the New Orleans VA Hospital construction site, the day after being forced into a runoff against her main challenger, Rep. Paul Cassidy, R-La., in New Orleans, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Good times roll again on the Louisiana bayou

The good times are about to roll again down on the Louisiana bayou. The good old boys gathered Monday to present a solid front against Mary L. Landrieu and her fading "clout." Gallantry be damned. Published November 10, 2014

Davy Crockett    Associated Press photo

Trying to be gracious on a bitter night

No sad-sack candidate gets out of bed on Election Day deciding what to say in a concession speech. There's always Harry S. Truman's miracle of 1948 to inspire a heartfelt prayer for a miracle. But late on election night, when all hope has vanished on a cloud of gloom, a loser has to step up to the cameras and say something nice about someone he, at the moment, purely despises. Published November 6, 2014

Gov. Earl Long in 1959    Associated Press photo

Bipartisan good news on election eve

After the poll is over, after the break of morn, after the consultants' leaving, after the stars are gone; Many a heart is aching, if you could read them all — many the hopes that have vanished, after the poll. Published November 3, 2014

Donald Trump poses for photographs during a ground-breaking ceremony for the Trump International Hotel on the site of the Old Post Office in Washington on July 23, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

'A new kind of hell to pay'

"Muddling through" is not an inspiring strategy for any president. Barack Obama's administration is a muddle, as anyone can see, and everyone can see that he's through as a leader, just when a leader is needed to reassure a frightened nation. Published October 30, 2014

In this Nov. 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama awards former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee with the Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to The Washington Post. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

Ben Bradlee and the end of a rowdy era

The obituaries for Ben Bradlee, who died this week age 93, invariably described him as "the legendary editor" of The Washington Post. That was careless language. Ben was not "legendary" at all. He was very real, as the Watergate defendants learned to their chagrin and sorrow. Published October 23, 2014

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it's a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench. Published October 20, 2014

The deadly virus in the electorate

Sometimes incompetence gets its due reward. No one has to accuse Barack Obama of spreading the Ebola virus. The incompetence of this administration is there for everyone to see, and suffer. "Leading from behind" works no better against a deadly virus than it has against evil in the Middle East and greedy ambition in Ukraine. Published October 16, 2014

Letting no panic go to waste

There's so much fuel for hysteria, a crisis-monger hardly knows where to start. Published October 13, 2014

Gov. Jerry Brown     Associated Press photo

Where 'water hogs' stalk the thirsty

Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink. The Ancient Mariner would feel right at home in California. Published October 9, 2014

Gov. Rick Perry   Associated Press photo

A virus, media boobs and the perfect storm

Some boobs in the media, which now include dozens of Internet websites where anything goes, the wilder and more improbable the better, are up to their usual standard of irresponsibility. The screamers are telling us that Ebola will soon kill us all, many of us at least twice. Published October 6, 2014

Bill Maher

The unlikely restoration of 'civility'

Talking about "civility," or what used to be called good manners until good manners disappeared, has become the rage in certain unlikely precincts in America. Talking about civility may be the next Big Thing. Published October 2, 2014

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flynn, the three-star Army general who has headed the Defense Intelligence Agency for less than two years is being nudged aside amid conflict within the agency and between the general and leaders elsewhere in the intelligence community, a senior defense official said Wednesday, April 30. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

A promise to defend America on the cheap

Maybe President Obama is beginning to understand the Islamist threat against America. Maybe. If he does, we'll owe a debt to the Americans who lost their heads to the barbarians. He still doesn't understand what he has to do about it. Published September 29, 2014

Gen. James Conway            Associated Press photo

Obama's all-American show in Iraq

Several American presidents have had quarrels with their generals, sometimes for reluctance to take the fight to the enemy, occasionally for wanting to take too much fight to the foe. Published September 22, 2014

Winston Churchill    Associated Press photo

Obama's coalition of the unwilling

Effective leaders never blow an uncertain trumpet. It neither inspires nor encourages, and only poisons the air. Better not to blow at all. Published September 18, 2014