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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flynn, the three-star Army general who has headed the Defense Intelligence Agency for less than two years is being nudged aside amid conflict within the agency and between the general and leaders elsewhere in the intelligence community, a senior defense official said Wednesday, April 30. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

A promise to defend America on the cheap

Maybe President Obama is beginning to understand the Islamist threat against America. Maybe. If he does, we'll owe a debt to the Americans who lost their heads to the barbarians. He still doesn't understand what he has to do about it. Published September 29, 2014

Gen. James Conway            Associated Press photo

Obama's all-American show in Iraq

Several American presidents have had quarrels with their generals, sometimes for reluctance to take the fight to the enemy, occasionally for wanting to take too much fight to the foe. Published September 22, 2014

Winston Churchill    Associated Press photo

Obama's coalition of the unwilling

Effective leaders never blow an uncertain trumpet. It neither inspires nor encourages, and only poisons the air. Better not to blow at all. Published September 18, 2014

George Washington    Portrait by Gilbert Stuart

Scotland the brave, on the brink

Old Blighty and Scotland the Brave have a lot of friends in places where it won't do the kingdom much good this week. The vote on whether to break up the United Kingdom, which seems unbelievable to outsiders, is so close that even the queen is getting into it. Published September 15, 2014

Douglas MacArthur      Associated Press photo

Off to a war, maybe

Douglas MacArthur got it right, two or so generations ago. "In war," he said after he was sacked by President Truman for wanting to spend the blood and muscle of young Americans for something greater than stalemate in Korea, "there is no substitute for victory." Published September 11, 2014

In this Sept. 6, 2014 image released by NBC, Chuck Todd, left, speaks with President Barack Obama prior to an interview for "Meet the Press" at the White House in Washington. Todd debuted as moderator of NBC's "Meet the Press," Sunday, Sept. 7, bringing a low-key style and surrounding himself with fellow pundits as NBC turns to him to erase a slide that has taken the long-running Sunday morning political affairs program from first to third in the ratings. (AP Photo/NBC, William B. Plowman)

When presidential boredom is not an option

President Obama's hair, like the locks of most of the presidents in their second terms, has turned white. He says he doesn't get enough sleep, but he's nevertheless energized, not exhausted. Bored is more like it. Published September 8, 2014

Both President Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron (right) have stepped up their rhetoric on the Islamic State group this week, and are hoping to rally international support for defeating the terrorist organization while attending the NATO summit. (Associated Press)

Obama gets a booster shot in Britain

Barack Obama spent Thursday in Wales, surrounded by NATO allies, and he borrowed a little courage from David Cameron, the prime minister of Britain, who is fed up with the barbarism of rogue Muslims who have established a thriving nest in his country, incubating terrorists. Published September 4, 2014

Alfred E. Neuman

Mr. Obama searches for a horse

There's chatter, and there's chatter, and only a trained intelligence ear can tell the difference. Published September 1, 2014

Mitt Romney

Another look at a savvy loser

Mitt Romney would defeat Barack Obama if they were matched again today. One or two polls say so. But they're not matched today and a poll like that is only for a friendly conversation over a cup of coffee. Published August 28, 2014

Sen. Rand Paul said former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's war record is likely to give independents and even some Democrats pause at the thought of supporting her in 2016.

No naps for the war-weary

It's a little early for the candidates of '16 to start calling each other names, but they're loosening tongues, limbering voices and auditioning invective, anyway. Published August 25, 2014

Gov. Rick Perry (Associated Press)

Brutal politics in a not-so-gay place

Somebody has finally indicted the famous ham sandwich that an infamous judge once said any prosecutor so inclined could do. Published August 18, 2014

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton holds her memoir "Hard Choices" at Bunch of Grapes Bookstore, in Vineyard Haven, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014, during a book signing event for her memoir "Hard Choices."  Hillary Rodham Clinton says she's looking forward to hugging out her differences with President Barack Obama. Obama's former secretary of state told reporters Wednesday that she's proud to have served with him despite some differences of opinion. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Huggin' and chalkin' on the campaign trail

Nothing comforts a child like a hug from his mother, or reassures like a father's manly embrace. The hug is a reassuring gift of affection that means something. Published August 14, 2014

Paul Ryan, inspiring Democrats

Democrats swimming in a sea turning red

Nobody reckons that election returns from Hawaii, stuck thousands of miles off the California coast in the vast reaches of the Pacific, have much to say about national political trends. Nevertheless, disappointment and disgust with the established order has reached across the waves. Published August 11, 2014

Mao Zedong

Something heroic for Obama's legacy

Unless he can find something and find it quickly, Barack Obama isn't going to like his legacy. The man who once walked on water may soon find himself at the bottom of the lake. Published August 7, 2014

** FILE ** In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. (Associated Press)

Ebola panic more lethal than the virus

Here we go again, and this time the panic is on steroids. The Ebola sickness is a horrific disease, and the virus that causes it is lethal and fast-moving. Published August 4, 2014

Alexander Hamilton, the nation's first Treasury secretary, in 1792 deftly handled a financial crisis like the one of 2008.

Cooling the manufactured impeachment panic

Manufacturing a crisis is what pundits and politicians do best, and the media mills are running three shifts daily now to manufacture panic over what the Democrats want the public to think is the impending impeachment of President Obama. Published July 31, 2014

Elizabeth Warren (Associated Press)

PRUDEN: The Democratic-wannabe mice under Hillary Clinton's feet

If Hillary Clinton is inevitable, why are so many mice scurrying about under her feet? Hillary is supposed to be the juggernaut of the ages, awash in money, feminist adulation and nostalgia for the security and serenity of the Clinton years, when nothing much happened beyond Bubba's Oval Office pantry. Published July 24, 2014