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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

Donald Trump poses for photographs during a ground-breaking ceremony for the Trump International Hotel on the site of the Old Post Office in Washington on July 23, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

'A new kind of hell to pay'

"Muddling through" is not an inspiring strategy for any president. Barack Obama's administration is a muddle, as anyone can see, and everyone can see that he's through as a leader, just when a leader is needed to reassure a frightened nation. Published October 30, 2014

In this Nov. 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama awards former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee with the Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to The Washington Post. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

Ben Bradlee and the end of a rowdy era

The obituaries for Ben Bradlee, who died this week age 93, invariably described him as "the legendary editor" of The Washington Post. That was careless language. Ben was not "legendary" at all. He was very real, as the Watergate defendants learned to their chagrin and sorrow. Published October 23, 2014

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it's a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench. Published October 20, 2014

The deadly virus in the electorate

Sometimes incompetence gets its due reward. No one has to accuse Barack Obama of spreading the Ebola virus. The incompetence of this administration is there for everyone to see, and suffer. "Leading from behind" works no better against a deadly virus than it has against evil in the Middle East and greedy ambition in Ukraine. Published October 16, 2014

Letting no panic go to waste

There's so much fuel for hysteria, a crisis-monger hardly knows where to start. Published October 13, 2014

Gov. Jerry Brown     Associated Press photo

Where 'water hogs' stalk the thirsty

Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink. The Ancient Mariner would feel right at home in California. Published October 9, 2014

Gov. Rick Perry   Associated Press photo

A virus, media boobs and the perfect storm

Some boobs in the media, which now include dozens of Internet websites where anything goes, the wilder and more improbable the better, are up to their usual standard of irresponsibility. The screamers are telling us that Ebola will soon kill us all, many of us at least twice. Published October 6, 2014

Bill Maher

The unlikely restoration of 'civility'

Talking about "civility," or what used to be called good manners until good manners disappeared, has become the rage in certain unlikely precincts in America. Talking about civility may be the next Big Thing. Published October 2, 2014

FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flynn, the three-star Army general who has headed the Defense Intelligence Agency for less than two years is being nudged aside amid conflict within the agency and between the general and leaders elsewhere in the intelligence community, a senior defense official said Wednesday, April 30. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

A promise to defend America on the cheap

Maybe President Obama is beginning to understand the Islamist threat against America. Maybe. If he does, we'll owe a debt to the Americans who lost their heads to the barbarians. He still doesn't understand what he has to do about it. Published September 29, 2014

Gen. James Conway            Associated Press photo

Obama's all-American show in Iraq

Several American presidents have had quarrels with their generals, sometimes for reluctance to take the fight to the enemy, occasionally for wanting to take too much fight to the foe. Published September 22, 2014

Winston Churchill    Associated Press photo

Obama's coalition of the unwilling

Effective leaders never blow an uncertain trumpet. It neither inspires nor encourages, and only poisons the air. Better not to blow at all. Published September 18, 2014

George Washington    Portrait by Gilbert Stuart

Scotland the brave, on the brink

Old Blighty and Scotland the Brave have a lot of friends in places where it won't do the kingdom much good this week. The vote on whether to break up the United Kingdom, which seems unbelievable to outsiders, is so close that even the queen is getting into it. Published September 15, 2014

Douglas MacArthur      Associated Press photo

Off to a war, maybe

Douglas MacArthur got it right, two or so generations ago. "In war," he said after he was sacked by President Truman for wanting to spend the blood and muscle of young Americans for something greater than stalemate in Korea, "there is no substitute for victory." Published September 11, 2014

In this Sept. 6, 2014 image released by NBC, Chuck Todd, left, speaks with President Barack Obama prior to an interview for "Meet the Press" at the White House in Washington. Todd debuted as moderator of NBC's "Meet the Press," Sunday, Sept. 7, bringing a low-key style and surrounding himself with fellow pundits as NBC turns to him to erase a slide that has taken the long-running Sunday morning political affairs program from first to third in the ratings. (AP Photo/NBC, William B. Plowman)

When presidential boredom is not an option

President Obama's hair, like the locks of most of the presidents in their second terms, has turned white. He says he doesn't get enough sleep, but he's nevertheless energized, not exhausted. Bored is more like it. Published September 8, 2014

Both President Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron (right) have stepped up their rhetoric on the Islamic State group this week, and are hoping to rally international support for defeating the terrorist organization while attending the NATO summit. (Associated Press)

Obama gets a booster shot in Britain

Barack Obama spent Thursday in Wales, surrounded by NATO allies, and he borrowed a little courage from David Cameron, the prime minister of Britain, who is fed up with the barbarism of rogue Muslims who have established a thriving nest in his country, incubating terrorists. Published September 4, 2014

Alfred E. Neuman

Mr. Obama searches for a horse

There's chatter, and there's chatter, and only a trained intelligence ear can tell the difference. Published September 1, 2014

Mitt Romney

Another look at a savvy loser

Mitt Romney would defeat Barack Obama if they were matched again today. One or two polls say so. But they're not matched today and a poll like that is only for a friendly conversation over a cup of coffee. Published August 28, 2014

Sen. Rand Paul said former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's war record is likely to give independents and even some Democrats pause at the thought of supporting her in 2016.

No naps for the war-weary

It's a little early for the candidates of '16 to start calling each other names, but they're loosening tongues, limbering voices and auditioning invective, anyway. Published August 25, 2014