Topic - Alan Greenspan

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  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Map and the Territory'

    Alan Greenspan began his career in economics as an analyst and forecaster. In his new book "The Map and the Territory," Mr. Greenspan presents an honest assessment of what economists can and cannot predict, along with many useful insights as to the way that both politicians and investors tend to behave. It is also a first-rate history of some of the failures and successes of economic policy over the past century by the ultimate economic-policy insider.

  • A board at the New York Stock Exchange shows the closing number for the Stand & Poor's 500 index, center, Friday, Nov. 22, 2013. The S&P rose nine points, or 0.5 percent, to close at 1,804.76. The stock market is on track for a 27 percent gain this year.  (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    EDITORIAL: Wall Street shakedown

    The Department of Justice decided to go after Wall Street investment bank J.P. Morgan over the firm's role in America's recent economic woes. The result last week was a $13 billion settlement, which is the biggest shakedown of a single company in American history.

  • Italy's new premier-designate Mario Monti addresses the media at the Senate in Rome on Nov. 14, 2011. (Associated Press)

    Europe's woes pall U.S. economic rebound

    Just as the outlook for the U.S. economy finally brightened in recent weeks, the darkening clouds in Europe threaten to overshadow budding signs of growth.

  • Illustration: Federal Reserve by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

    FEULNER: Focusing on the Fed

    "I'd prop him up and put a pair of dark glasses on him and keep him as long as I could."

  • SANDERS: The (almost) silent great debate

    In a world taken up with wars, terrorism, earthquakes, tsunamis, radiation, rising food prices and a possible famine in North Korea, there's a quiet fundamental debate going on.

  • "Meet the Press" moderator David Gregory (left) interviews former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan on Sunday, Aug. 1, 2010. Mr. Greenspan said a rising stock market will do more to stimulate the economy than any of the remedies now being discussed. (AP Photo/NBC, Stephen J. Boitano)

    Greenspan: Modest economic recovery in a 'pause'

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said Sunday he thinks the economy is having a modest recovery, but right now there's a "pause" in that recovery, so it feels like a "quasi-recession."

  • VERSACE: Schools profit as workers update skills

    Corporate earnings continued at a fast and furious pace this week, and we started to hear from a wider variety of companies. Again, however, it was a mixed bag.

  • Nancy Pelosi

    Democrats mull taxes for higher earners

    A small but growing chorus of Capitol Hill Democrats say they support delaying a scheduled expiration of Bush-era tax cuts on wealthier Americans, bucking the Obama administration's desire to shield only middle-income earners from a tax increase.

  • Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan pauses on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 7, 2010, while testifying before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission hearing examining the causes of the collapse of major financial institutions caused by subprime lending. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Greenspan says Fannie, Freddie central in crisis

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan on Wednesday testified that mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac played a critical role in fostering an explosion of growth in the subprime mortgage market that led to the global financial crisis.

  • Regulators under fire for ignoring red flags

    Sheila Bair logged onto her e-mail account recently and got a pop-up ad offering a $175,000 home loan with monthly payments of only $400.

  • The credit markets

    Something very big appears to have occurred throughout the U.S. long-term credit markets since early May. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note recently reached its highest level since 2002. America's inverted yield curve suddenly "disinverted" for a brief period. Meanwhile, conflicting inflationary signals abounded. And former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan's famous conundrum may soon be a memory.

  • Education and inequality

    During his latter years as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, Alan Greenspan routinely warned about the long-term, adverse consequences that rising income inequality imposes on democratic societies. As incomes for lesser-skilled workers grow far more slowly than incomes of the highly skilled, "[t]he consequence, of course," is "an increased concentration of income," he told the Joint Economic Committee in June 2005. "As I've often said, this is not the type of thing which a democratic society — a capitalist democratic society — can really accept without addressing." Mr. Greenspan repeatedly stressed that the best antidote would be to increase education levels of the nation's workforce, a policy prescription that his successor as Fed chairman, Ben Bernanke, has enthusiastically endorsed.

  • Education and inequality

    During his latter years as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, Alan Greenspan routinely warned about the long-term, adverse consequences that rising income inequality imposes on democratic societies. As incomes for lesser-skilled workers grow far more slowly than incomes of the highly skilled, "[t]he consequence, of course," is "an increased concentration of income," he told the Joint Economic Committee in June 2005. "As I've often said, this is not the type of thing which a democratic society — a capitalist democratic society — can really accept without addressing." Mr. Greenspan repeatedly stressed that the best antidote would be to increase education levels of the nation's workforce, a policy prescription that his successor as Fed chairman, Ben Bernanke, has enthusiastically endorsed.

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