Topic - Federal Communications Commission

), and with the majority of its commissioners appointed by the current President. The FCC works towards six goals in the areas of broadband, competition, the spectrum, the media, public safety and homeland security, and modernizing the FCC. - Source: Wikipedia

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  • FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the House Energy and Commerce Committee. The Federal Communications Commission is setting out to unravel the mystery behind the Internet traffic jams bogging down the delivery of Netflix videos and other online content. The inquiry announced Friday, June 13, 2014, by Wheeler will dissect the routes that video and other data travel to reach Internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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  • FILE - In file photo taken Aug. 21, 2010, a Verizon sign is shown at New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. On Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014 a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit affirmed that the FCC had authority to create open-access rules. But in a setback for the Obama administration's goal of Internet openness, the court ruled that the FCC failed to establish that its 2010 regulations don't overreach. Under so-called net neutrality rules adopted in 2010 by the Federal Communications Commission, wired broadband providers such as Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Verizon were barred from prioritizing some types of Internet traffic over others.(AP Photo/Peter Morgan)

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  • FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the House Energy and Commerce Committee. The Federal Communications Commission is setting out to unravel the mystery behind the Internet traffic jams bogging down the delivery of Netflix videos and other online content. The inquiry announced Friday, June 13, 2014, by Wheeler will dissect the routes that video and other data travel to reach Internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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  • IMAGE DISTRIBUTED FOR FRISKIES - Friskies® “official spokescat,” Grumpy Cat helped announce the third annual “The Friskies” awards, for the best Internet cat videos of the year, during VidCon at the Anaheim Convention Center, Friday, June 27, 2014, in Anaheim, Calif. Fans can enter "The Friskies" at www.TheFriskies.com. (Bret Hartman/AP Images for Friskies)

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  • FILE--In this April 18, 2012, file photo, David Tucker, executive director of Vermont's Enhanced 911 Board, holds a smart phone in Montpelier, Vt. Tucker says the state is the first in the country where customers of the four major wireless carriers can send text messages to 911. As of Monday, May 19, 2014, T-Mobile customers in Vermont are now able to text 911. Verizon, AT&T and Sprint began the service earlier. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot, file)

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