Topic - International Security Assistance Force

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  • Afghan National Army soldiers march in the Sangin district of Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan on Thursday, June 13, 2013. One of the most significant turning points in one of America's longest and costliest wars is imminent: Afghanistan's fledgling security forces are taking the lead for security nationwide, bringing the moment of truth on the question of whether they are ready to fight an insurgency that remains resilient after nearly 12 years of conflict. That question is especially pressing here in this border region, where insurgents regularly ambush government forces and control parts of the countryside. (AP Photo/Allauddin Khan)

    Afghans poised to take security lead from U.S., NATO

    One of the most significant turning points in one of America's longest and costliest wars is imminent: Afghanistan's fledgling security forces are taking the lead for security nationwide, bringing the moment of truth on the question of whether they are ready to fight an insurgency that remains resilient after nearly 12 years of conflict.

  • ** FILE ** Afghans push a damaged car from the scene of a militant attack by a suicide car bomber and Taliban militants disguised in burqas in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Wednesday, May 2, 2012. (AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid)

    Coalition will no longer publish Taliban attack figures in Afghanistan

    The U.S.-led military command in Afghanistan said Tuesday it will no longer publish figures on Taliban attacks, a week after acknowledging that its report of a 7 percent decline in attacks last year was actually no decline at all.

  • A U.S. soldier (right) photographs the scene where an insurgent was shot to death near an Afghan intelligence office in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013. A series of early morning attacks hit in the nation's east on Sunday, with three separate suicide bombings in outlying provinces and a shootout between security forces and a would-be attacker in the capital. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

    Reported drop in Taliban attacks in Afghanistan was incorrect

    The U.S.-led military command in Afghanistan incorrectly reported a decline last year in Taliban attacks and is preparing to publish corrected numbers that could undercut its narrative of a Taliban in steep decline.

  • Afghanistan presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi speaks during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has ordered all U.S. special forces to leave eastern Wardak province within two weeks because of allegations that Afghans working with them are torturing and abusing other Afghans. (AP Photo/Ahmad Nazar)

    NATO: No evidence for Afghan claim of misconduct

    The U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan has found no evidence so far to support Afghan allegations of misconduct by American special forces in a strategic eastern province, the alliance's spokesman said on Monday.

  • U.S. Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford (right) shakes hands with U.S. Marine Gen. John Allen (left), the outgoing NATO commander, during a change-of-command ceremony at the International Security Assistance Force headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Gen. Dunford takes charge at a critical time for President Obama and the military as foreign combat forces prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan by the end of 2014. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini, Pool)

    New U.S. commander takes the helm in Afghanistan

    U.S. Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford took over Sunday as the new and probably last commander of all U.S. and international forces in Afghanistan.

  • Afghan police secure the site of a suicide bombing in Khost, south of Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, Oct. 1, 2012. The suicide bomber was driving a motorcycle packed with explosives and rammed it into a patrol of Afghan and international forces, killing over a dozen people, including three NATO service members and their translator, official said. (AP Photo/Nashanuddin Khan)

    NATO resumes training of Afghan police recruits

    Special operations forces in Afghanistan have resumed training Afghan Local Police recruits after a suspension last month in response to two insider attacks by recruits on their international coalition trainers in August, U.S. officials say.

  • Afghan police secure the site of a suicide bombing in Khost, south of Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, Oct. 1, 2012. The suicide bomber was driving a motorcycle packed with explosives and rammed it into a patrol of Afghan and international forces, killing over a dozen people, including three NATO service members and their translator, official said. (AP Photo/Nashanuddin Khan)

    NATO weeds out suspect recruits, resumes Afghan police training

    Special operations forces in Afghanistan have resumed training Afghan Local Police recruits after a suspension last month in response to two insider attacks by recruits on their international coalition trainers in August, U.S. officials say.

  • The U.S. is underreporting the number of incidents in which U.S. and coalition troops have been fired on by Afghan soldiers and police, the AP reports. The coalition reports fatalities, but it does not mention those wounded or incidents in which troops were fired on but no one was hit. (Associated Press)

    U.S. mum on some Afghan attacks

    The military is underreporting the number of times that Afghan soldiers and police open fire on American and other foreign troops.

  • An Afghan protestor holds a copy of Islam's holy book Koran as he shouts slogans during an anti-U.S. demonstration on Feb. 22, 2012, in Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan. (Associated Press)

    Probe of Afghan Koran burning nearing completion

    A joint investigation by NATO and Afghan officials into the burning of copies of the Koran that triggered riots and more than 30 deaths is nearly complete, and preliminary findings could be released within days, Western officials said Wednesday.

  • Illustration: Job opening by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

    KNAPP: Kandahar's newest job opening

    When Kandahar godfather Ahmed Wali Karzai (AWK) met a mafia shyster's ending on July 12, hardly a prayer was whispered before thoughts of the proverbial "power vacuum" seized the international media, the International Security Assistance Force and Kandahars themselves.

  • U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, left, speaks during a joint news conference with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, right, at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, June 4, 2011. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

    In Kabul, Gates urges patience with war

    U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates appealed for patience with an unpopular war and said Saturday that only modest U.S. troop reductions would make sense this summer in a still unstable Afghanistan.

  • "What became pretty obvious with [bin Laden's] death is that he was pretty irrelevant," said Australian Maj. Gen. Michael G. Krause, deputy chief of staff of the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan.

    General: Turnover situation in Afghanistan good

    A senior general for the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan said Wednesday that coalition forces have made significant gains against the insurgents in the country, boosting plans to give Afghan forces a greater role in security beginning next month.

  • U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, addresses the Royal United Services Institute in London on Wednesday, March 23, 2011. Gen. Petraeus said foreign troops are on course to complete their security role in Afghanistan by the end of 2014, but he has warned that progress easily could be reversed. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

    BIDDLE & OHANLON: Slogging it out in Afghanistan

    How is it really going in Afghanistan? In his recent testimony before Congress, Gen. David H. Petraeus reported substantial if fragile progress and conveyed a can-do attitude reflecting confidence about our prospects. Yet press reports and some organizations and individuals on the ground seem to grow more dispirited by the month. Is this mission really doable - and should we stick with it?

  • ** FILE ** President Obama, followed by, from second from left, Gen. David Petraeus, Defense Secretary Robert Gates, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., and Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen, walks to the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 23, 2010. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    EDITORIAL: McChrystal's final agony

    Gen. Stanley McChrystal has ended his military career with a self-inflicted wound. He's the victim of a needless crisis in which President Obama seems more defensive than decisive.

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