Topic - John D. Bates

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  • Former D.C. Council member Harry Thomas Jr. makes his way to a waiting car after his sentencing at the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse in Washington, D.C., Thursday, May 3, 2012. (Rod Lamkey Jr/The Washington Times)

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  • **FILE** Former D.C. Council member Harry Thomas Jr. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)

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  • Former D.C. Council member Harry Thomas Jr. makes his way to a waiting car after his sentencing at the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse in Washington, D.C., Thursday, May 3, 2012. (Rod Lamkey Jr/The Washington Times)

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  • U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks during a news conference announcing the indictment of six more New Orleans Police officers in the Danziger Bridge shooting and cover-up in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Tuesday, July 13, 2010, at the Hale Boggs Federal Building in New Orleans. U.S. Attorney Jim Letten, is seen at right. (AP Photo/The Times-Picayune, Michael DeMocker)

    EDITORIAL: Holder smacked down over voting

    The Justice Department's Civil Rights Division has lurched from multiple controversies into an outright embarrassment. In an order issued Sept. 16, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates of the District of Columbia gave Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr.'s team the legal equivalent of a 2-by-4 across the head. The department's handling of a voting rights case from Shelby County, Ala., has been so slipshod as to invite questions of its legal competence across the board.

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