Topic - Joseph Stalin

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    A Jewish lawmaker said Wednesday that he wants an apology from a Republican candidate for California governor who compared President Barack Obama's gun control policies to those of dictators such as Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin and North Korea's Kim Jong Il.

  • SOCHI SCENE: Stalin's Dacha

    Before it was an Olympic city, Sochi was a Black Sea resort town favored by Russians trying to escape the cold up north.

  • Illustration by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

    HANSON: History casts doubt on Iran nuclear pact

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  • President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin met in June in Northern Ireland. Mr. Obama has put off a scheduled meeting in Moscow following Mr. Putin's granting of asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden.
(Associated Press)

    PRUDEN: On the run is no place for a president

    June, with balmy nights lighted by the lovers' moon and crickets singing love songs from the hedges, is the dreamy time of summer. August, with white-hot afternoons and everything burnt and brown, is where dreams shrivel and go to die.

  • On the run is no place for a president

    June, with balmy nights lighted by the lovers' moon and crickets singing love songs from the hedges, is the dreamy time of summer. August, with white-hot afternoons and everything burnt and brown, is where dreams shrivel and go to die.

  • Artists' spat over Putin joins a Russian tradition

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  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Berlin on the Brink’

    The German capital, center of Nazi power, represented the big prize at the end of World War II. The victorious Allies -- the United States, the Soviet Union, Britain and France -- occupied and divided the city into four zones. The arrangement was meant to guarantee access to all.

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    Capturing the "see no (or little) evil" mentality that plagued a war-weary America in 1949 requires no small amount of research. That was post-war America. Both peace and prosperity had returned for the first time since the 1929 market crash .

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  • Review: A skilled cast evokes Stalin-era horrors

    "Judaism isn't my life," a prisoner says in "The Twenty-Seventh Man," Nathan Englander's sad and chilling play about a group of Jewish writers rounded up by Josef Stalin's secret police. "It's my culture, my language. No more."

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Iron Curtain’

    The year 1945 marked the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany and the defeat of Imperial Japan. At the same time, it ushered in the birth of the atomic age. It also was the year the Soviet Union's military occupation of Eastern and Central Europe took hold, following the Red Army's triumphant march from Stalingrad into Berlin.

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Six Months in 1945’

    By the time Franklin D. Roosevelt died in April 1945, his grand vision of the world was rapidly slipping from his grasp. Once Nazi Germany was defeated, FDR hoped to leave Europe to Britain and the Soviet Union, but he had no answer to the question of just how Britain was supposed to single-handedly defend freedom on the Continent, overmatched as it clearly was.

  • **FILE** A group of American and British POWs being held by the Germans, including Lt. Col. John H. Van Vliet Jr. and Capt. Donald B. Stewart, look over a mass grave where murdered Polish officers are buried, near Smolensk, Russia, in May 1943. The Soviet secret police killed the Poles in 1940, hoping to eliminate an elite that would have resisted Soviet control of Poland. Van Vliet and Stewart were among a group of British and American prisoners forced to see the horrifying site by the Germans, who wanted word to get out to the world of the Soviet atrocity. (Associated Press)

    Memos show U.S. hushed up Soviet crime

    The testimony about the infamous massacre of Polish officers might have lessened the tragic fate that befell Poland under the Soviets, some scholars believe. Instead, it mysteriously vanished into the heart of American power.

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    Antony Beevor makes the reader believe in the impossible: that he could write a history of magisterial authority about the greatest war of modern times and do justice to the global reach of that war.

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Stalin's General'

    As an amateur student of military affairs, I have my own informal list of the "best" generals in World War II. The familiar names rattle out easily: Eisenhower, Bradley, Montgomery, Marshall and so on.

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