Topic - Keith B. Alexander

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  • Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr., Wisconsin Republican, speaks at a town-hall meeting on Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013, in West Bend, Wis. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps)

    Key GOP, Democratic lawmakers team up on anti-snooping bill

    The Republican author of the Patriot Act in the House and the senior Democrat in the Senate teamed up Tuesday to write a bill that would stop the National Security Agency's bulk collection of phone records, setting up a major clash with other lawmakers and the Obama administration who are feverishly fighting to preserve the snooping program.

  • National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith Alexander testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013, before the Senate Judiciary Committee oversight hearing on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. U.S. intelligence officials say the government shutdown is seriously damaging the intelligence community’s ability to guard against threats. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    NSA chief's admission of misleading numbers adds to Obama administration blunders

    The Obama administration's credibility on intelligence suffered another blow Wednesday as the chief of the National Security Agency admitted that officials put out numbers that vastly overstated the counterterrorism successes of the government's warrantless bulk collection of all Americans' phone records.

  • **FILE** Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 18, 2013. (Associated Press)

    U.S. cyberwar offense 'best in the world': NSA's Gen. Keith Alexander

    The United States has the best offensive military capacity in cyberspace of any nation, the head of the agency at the center of a domestic spying scandal said in congressional testimony published Monday.

  • **FILE** Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 18, 2013. (Associated Press)

    Secrets are hard to keep in the whole wired world; hacker, intelligence cultures clash

    When retired Air Force Gen. Michael V. Hayden headed the CIA, one question vexed him so much that he set up a special working group to help him answer it: "Will America be able to conduct espionage in the future, inside a political culture that every day demands more and more transparency in every facet of national life?" Mr. Hayden said the working group "came back with the answer, more or less: 'We're not sure.'"

  • **FILE** Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 18, 2013. (Associated Press)

    NSA chief tries to assuage public over spying programs

    The head of the National Security Agency said Sunday that the former analyst who leaked information about American spying programs cause "irreversible damage" to the country and is not acting, "in my opinion, with noble intent."

  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Prove NSA prevented terrorist acts

    According to Gen. Keith B. Alexander, NSA surveillance had helped prevent more than 50 potential terrorist events since Sept. 11, 2001, and at least 10 homeland-based threats. If this is an accurate statement, when were these subjects arrested and tried for their activities? Or is that a classified matter without the need to know by the citizens of this country? I guess it is best to keep things under wraps so as not to cause a panic, like the potential panic caused by the NSA and other government agencies who have lied to the public for decades.

  • "We do have significant concerns [about contractors], and it is something that we need to look at," says NSA Director Gen. Keith B. Alexander, on the leaks of top-secret information.
(Associated Press)

    Inside the Ring: NSA contractor threat

    National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith B. Alexander this week revealed new details about the electronic spying agency's use of private contractors like renegade NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

  • From left: Deputy Attorney General James Cole; Chris Inglis, deputy director of the National Security Agency; Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency; Sean Joyce, Deputy Director of the FBI; and Robert Litt, general counsel to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, testify before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence in Washington on June 18, 2013, regarding NSA surveillance. (Associated Press)

    NSA director says a few phone checks helped foil many terrorist plots

    The National Security Agency last year checked fewer than 300 telephone numbers against its database containing details about every phone call made in America, intelligence officials said Tuesday. The rare admission was part of the Obama administration's effort to reassure Americans about NSA data-gathering programs that officials said had foiled more than 50 terrorist plots in the United States and abroad.

  • Gen. Keith B. Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, said on Wednesday he would discuss specific foiled terrorist plots in more detail Thursday during a closed congressional hearing on the NSA leak. (Associated Press)

    NSA says efforts have foiled plots; leaks causing a reassessment

    The director of the National Security Agency said Wednesday that "dozens" of terrorist plots have been foiled as a result of a top-secret telecommunications surveillance program that has come under public scrutiny after a former contractor leaked information about it last week.

  • ** FILE ** Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander (Associated Press)

    NSA director to testify before Congress; leak scandal likely topic

    The director of the National Security Agency is heading to Capitol Hill, where lawmakers likely will grill him Wednesday on how a low-level contractor was able to access and leak top-secret information on the agency's telecommunications surveillance program

  • The Cyber Strikes Back: Pentagon to go on offense against cyberattacks

    The Defense Department is building an "offensive" cyberforce to counter increasing threats by hackers, criminals and foreign agents to the nation's computer networks, the commander of U.S. Cyber Command told a Senate panel Tuesday.

  • Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, chief of U.S. Cyber Command, this week told a Chinese reporter that he thinks "defending our country in cyberspace is one of our most important missions ...  to ensure that we're secure." (Associated Press)

    Inside the Ring: CyberCom chief on digital war training

    Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the commander of the new U.S. Cyber Command, this week defended the creation of the military's digital war-fighting command and its training of cyberwarriors for future high-tech combat.

  • ** FILE ** Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander (Associated Press)

    NSA chief defends agency against domestic spying charges

    The head of the National Security Agency on Monday denied reports that NSA's new data center in Utah would collect and store data about Americans, including their e-mails and web-browsing habits.

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Quotations
  • During a speech to a conference hosted by the Association of the Old Crows, an electronic warfare group, Gen. Alexander said that "my persona has been used out there."

    Inside the Ring →

  • Internet and wireless communication devices and networks are expanding rapidly, Gen. Alexander said, creating new opportunities as well as vulnerabilities for cybercrime, espionage and data theft.

    Inside the Ring →

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