Topic - Michael Huerta

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  • FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2014 file photo, Federal Aviation Administration Administrator Michael Huerta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Huerta is scheduled to visit Grand Forks, N.D., April 21, 2014, to review North Dakota's growing unmanned aircraft industry. He will then go to Williston to get a firsthand look at airport infrastructure needs in the western oil patch, according to the state's congressional delegation. The FAA late last year named North Dakota as one of six states that will be test sites for integrating drones into civilian airspace. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Heads of FAA, Transportation coming to ND in April

    The heads of the Federal Aviation Administration and the federal Transportation Department are scheduled to come to North Dakota next month.

  • FAA says Boeing 787's design, manufacture safe

    Boeing's design and manufacture of its cutting-edge 787 jetliner is safe despite the many problems encountered since the plane's rollout, including a fire that forced a redesign of the its batteries, according to a report issued jointly Wednesday by the Federal Aviation Administration and the aircraft maker.

  • ** FILE ** A small Draganflyer X6 drone is photographed during a test flight in Mesa County, Colo., on Jan. 8, 2009. (Associated Press/Mesa County Sheriff's Department)

    Invasion: 7,500 drones in U.S. airspace within 5 years, FAA warns

    The chief of the Federal Aviation Administration predicted Thursday that U.S. airspace could be crowded with as many as 7,500 commercial drones within the next five years, as he unveiled a long-awaited regulatory blueprint that seeks to protect Americans' privacy while requiring testing for law enforcement and private companies seeking to operate unmanned aerial vehicles.

  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Michael Huerta announces that government safety rules are changing to let airline passengers use most electronic devices from gate-to-gate during a news conference, Thursday, Oct. 31, 2013, at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport. The change will let passengers read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music _ but not make cellphone calls. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    FAA OKs air passengers using gadgets on planes

    Airline passengers will be able to use their electronic devices gate-to-gate to read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music — but not talk on their cellphones — under much-anticipated new guidelines issued Thursday by the Federal Aviation Administration.

  • A Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner jet aircraft is surrounded by emergency vehicles while parked at a Terminal E gate at Logan International Airport in Boston on Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, following a fire that started in one of the plane's lithium ion batteries. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

    Recommendation on Boeing 787s expected next week

    Experts at the Federal Aviation Administration are expected to say next week whether they recommend accepting Boeing's plan to fix its troubled 787 Dreamliners so the planes can resume flying, the agency's head said Wednesday.

  • A Japan Airlines Boeing 787 "Dreamliner" jet aircraft is surrounded by emergency vehicles while parked at a Terminal E gate at Logan International Airport in Boston on Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, following a fire that started in one of the plane's lithium ion batteries. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

    U.S. officials defend handling of Boeing 787 mishaps

    Obama administration officials struggled Wednesday to defend their initial statements that the Boeing 787 Dreamliner is safe, while promising a transparent probe of mishaps involving the aircraft's batteries.

  • **FILE** Boeing's newest aircraft, the Boeing 787, sits on the tarmac at Huntsville International Airport in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 27, 2012, after a 3600-mile flight from Dublin. (Associated Press/The Huntsville Times)

    FAA to review of Boeing 787, but calls plane safe

    The government stepped in Friday to assure the public that Boeing's new 787 "Dreamliner" is safe to fly, even as it launched a comprehensive review to find out what caused a fire, a fuel leak and other worrisome incidents this week.

  • ** FILE ** In this Sept. 10, 2010, file photo Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Randy Babbitt speaks in Washington. Babbitt has been charged with driving while intoxicated following a weekend traffic stop in northern Virginia. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    FAA chief resigns after drunken driving arrest

    Randy Babbitt says he will resign as head of the Federal Aviation Administration following his arrest over the weekend on charges of drunken driving.

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Quotations
  • "The review team identified some problems with the manufacturing process and the way we oversee it, and we are moving quickly to address those problems," Huerta said.

    FAA says Boeing 787's design, manufacture safe →

  • "Unmanned aircraft offer new ways for commercial enterprises and public operators to increase operational efficiency, decrease costs and enhance safety; and this road map will allow us to safely and efficiently integrate them into the (national air space)," FAA Administrator Michael Huerta says on the website.

    Florida firm explores unmanned aircraft market →

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