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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, center right, shakes hands with North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Sin Hong Chol on his arrival at Pyongyang Airport, North Korea Thursday, May 31, 2018. Lavrov's visit comes ahead of a planned summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and is seen as an attempt by Moscow to ensure its voice is heard in the North's diplomatic overtures with Washington, Seoul and Beijing. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)

Russia frets as Trump orchestrates the mother of all deals

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov was in Pyongyang Thursday, greeted with much fanfare on his way to talks with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. It's a little drop-by that reveals many things about Russia, its priorities in Northeast Asia and its approach to the crisis on the Korean peninsula.

Botswana

Botswana's opportunity to recommit to rule of law

As the battles between world powers over the African continent heat up, African nations themselves are going to have to choose. Do we attempt to establish democracy and follow the rule of law, or do we go down the path of emulating and colluding with totalitarian nations?

European Council President Donald Tusk, right, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban participate in a media conference at the EU Council building in Brussels on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is visiting EU officials on Thursday to discuss the current migration crisis. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

A battle of wills over Polish courts exposes EU bullying

The European Union has long criticized its East European members — the former Soviet satellites Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic — for alleged "authoritarian" tendencies. The George Soros-backed, open-borders policy favored by Western European leaders has long been a sore point between East and West, with East European leaders refusing to admit millions of economic migrants from the Middle East and other world crisis spots whom they see as a threat to their security, culture and identity as a people.

President Donald Trump delivers a statement on the Iran nuclear deal from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House, Tuesday, May 8, 2018, in Washington. Trump announced the U.S. will pull out of the landmark nuclear accord with Iran, dealing a profound blow to U.S. allies and potentially deepening the president's isolation on the world stage.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump thwarts Dr. Evil

The seething rage coming from Obamaland is palpable -- President Trump has withdrawn from the Iran deal, Barack Obama's signature achievement.

In this Dec. 10, 2009, file photo, people walk in Red Square, with St. Basil Cathedral, left, the Kremlin's Spassky Tower, right back, and Lenin Mausoleum, right, in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze, File) **FILE**

Russians fleeing a bad situation

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty reported this week asylum applications by Russian citizens in the United States hit a 24-year high in 2017, jumping nearly 40 percent from the previous year and continuing an upward march that began after Vladimir Putin began his second run as president in 2012.

File-This Nov. 10, 2017, file photo shows Russia's President Vladimir Putin, left, and Russian metals magnate Oleg Deripaska, right, walking to attend the APEC Business Advisory Council dialogue in Danang, Vietnam. The United States punished dozens of Russian oligarchs and government officials on Friday, April 6, 2018, with sanctions that took direct aim at President Putin's inner circle, as President Donald Trump's administration tried to show he's not afraid to take tough action against Moscow. Seven Russian tycoons, including aluminum magnate Deripaska, were targeted, along with 17 officials and a dozen Russian companies, the Treasury Department said.  (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File) **FILE**

For Russia, the hits just keep coming from Team Trump

So now the Democrats have sued the Trump campaign, Russia and WikiLeaks over supposed "collusion" during the 2016 presidential election. But even as President Trump's critics accuse him of going easy on the Kremlin, the hits from the White House toward Moscow just keep on coming.

Targeting Handguns Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The left's war on self-defense

In Arizona, there is a special election to replace Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned earlier this year. Making special appearances to help the Democrat in that race are the kids from Parkland, Florida.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting in the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, the home of the Soviet nuclear weapons program and later Soviet and Russian non-military nuclear technologies, in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, April 10, 2018. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Trump's Syria actions a test of Russia's weapons

Russia doesn't make much, but they do make really good weapons. In fact, one of the purposes of Russian involvement in the civil war in Syria, in addition to preserving Russian influence in the region, was to promote Russian military technology.