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FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2006, file photo, Nathan Weyiouanna's abandoned house at the west end of Shishmaref, Alaska, sits on the beach after sliding off during a fall storm in 2005. Alaska health officials are warning that serious health issues could crop up as the state warms. A report by the Alaska Division of Public Health released this week says longer growing seasons and fewer deaths from exposure are likely positive outcomes from climate change. But the 77-page report says additional diseases, lower air quality from more wildfires, melting permafrost and disturbances to local food sources also are potential outcomes. Warming already has thawed soil and eroded coastlines, leading at least three villages, Shishmaref, Kivalina and Newtok to consider relocating.  (AP Photo/Diana Haecker, File)

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2006, file photo, Nathan Weyiouanna's abandoned house at the west end of Shishmaref, Alaska, sits on the beach after sliding off during a fall storm in 2005. Alaska health officials are warning that serious health issues could crop up as the state warms. A report by the Alaska Division of Public Health released this week says longer growing seasons and fewer deaths from exposure are likely positive outcomes from climate change. But the 77-page report says additional diseases, lower air quality from more wildfires, melting permafrost and disturbances to local food sources also are potential outcomes. Warming already has thawed soil and eroded coastlines, leading at least three villages, Shishmaref, Kivalina and Newtok to consider relocating. (AP Photo/Diana Haecker, File)

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