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This June 7, 2020, photo provided by June Linnertz shows her father, James Gill, seen through a window at Cherrywood Pointe nursing home in Plymouth, Minn. As more than 90,000 of America’s long-term care residents have died in the coronavirus pandemic, advocates for the elderly say a tandem wave of death separate from the virus has quietly claimed tens of thousands more, often because overburdened workers haven’t been able to give them the care they need. Gill died of Lewy Body Dementia, according to a copy of his death certificate provided to the AP. Linnertz always expected her father to die of the condition, which causes a progressive loss of memory and movement, but never thought he would end his days in so much needless pain. (June Linnertz via AP)

This June 7, 2020, photo provided by June Linnertz shows her father, James Gill, seen through a window at Cherrywood Pointe nursing home in Plymouth, Minn. As more than 90,000 of America’s long-term care residents have died in the coronavirus pandemic, advocates for the elderly say a tandem wave of death separate from the virus has quietly claimed tens of thousands more, often because overburdened workers haven’t been able to give them the care they need. Gill died of Lewy Body Dementia, according to a copy of his death certificate provided to the AP. Linnertz always expected her father to die of the condition, which causes a progressive loss of memory and movement, but never thought he would end his days in so much needless pain. (June Linnertz via AP)

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