Forcing Soldiers Out .JPEG-08bcc.jpg - Washington Times
Skip to content

FILE - This Nov. 7, 2013 file photo shows Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, young men and women joined the military to fight through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and the dusty deserts of Iraq. Less than 10 years later, many of these young officers are captains in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But now, as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, many are being told they have to leave. The process is painful and frustrating. In quiet conversations across Fort Bragg, N.C., and at Fort Eustas in Virginia, captains talked about their frustrations and their fears. And they nervously wait as their fates rest in the hands of evaluation boards that may spend only a few minutes reading through each service record before making the decision that may end their careers.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
Photo by: Jacquelyn Martin
FILE - This Nov. 7, 2013 file photo shows Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington. In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, young men and women joined the military to fight through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and the dusty deserts of Iraq. Less than 10 years later, many of these young officers are captains in the Army with multiple combat deployments under their belts. But now, as the wars wind down and Pentagon budgets shrink, many are being told they have to leave. The process is painful and frustrating. In quiet conversations across Fort Bragg, N.C., and at Fort Eustas in Virginia, captains talked about their frustrations and their fears. And they nervously wait as their fates rest in the hands of evaluation boards that may spend only a few minutes reading through each service record before making the decision that may end their careers. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Featured Photo Galleries

CounselGalleryCOVER.jpg

Special Counsels Rack Up Bills

Robert Mueller’s special counsel investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election has cost $6.7 million during the first four and a half months of the probe. Click to see past independent counsel investigations guilty of racking up high bills.