- The Washington Times - Monday, December 27, 2021

Organizers of a Jan 8 religious rally in Florida say they hope to ignite a nationwide spiritual revival.

“The Renewal 2022” follows up on a 2020 Washington, D.C., religious rally that drew thousands to the National Mall. 

The Jan. 8 event, originating from Plant City, about 20 minutes east of Tampa, is expected to air on several Christian cable channels as well as via satellite to churches nationally.

Among speakers expected at the daylong rally are Rep. Louie Gohmert, Texas Republican, former Rep. Michele Bachmann, Minnesota Republican, and former HUD Secretary Ben Carson, a 2016 GOP presidential contender, as well as My Pillow entrepreneur Mike Lindell. 

Retired U.S. military officers on the speakers’ list include Lt. Gen. William “Jerry” Boykin, Maj. Gen. Robert F. Dees, and Col. David Giammona, a military chaplain who retired after 31 years of service.



Rev. Kevin Jessip, who is organizing the event, told The Washington Times that he believes this is a crucial time for the nation.

“I believe in this darkest hour of American history, we’re about to see the greatest move of God ever, as dark and light converge in this epic battle of the end times,” he said. “The whole world is watching America and what we’re doing; it’s crucially important that we begin to return back to God. He is the answer,” he added.

Along with Mr. Jessip, the event will feature messianic Rabbi Jonathan Cahn and evangelical pastors Carter Conlon of New York’s Times Square Church, Regeneration Nashville leader Kent Christmas, and Paul Pickern, CEO of All Pro Pastors International, a ministerial support group.

Mr. Jessip contends that “America has broken the covenant made by our forefathers” with God and is “under judgment” as a result. He hopes a spiritual renewal will forestall the spiritual punishments he believes are coming on the nation.

He said this does not mean “America will be destroyed or cease to exist,” but rather that the nation is in his view, “teetering on the edge. And the things that happened in ancient Israel before its destruction are now happening in America, including plagues.”

Mr. Jessip emphasized “This is not a political meeting. It’s a spiritual meeting about America’s spiritual crisis, and the answer to that, which is returning to God and reconciling and restoring the covenant that this nation had with God.”

Col. Giammona, now living in Columbus, Georgia, said a single event can spark a national movement. He cited the 1906 Azusa Street Revival led by Black Pentecostal preacher William J. Seymour, which led to the birth of the Assemblies of God denomination to which Col. Giammona belongs.

Those meetings, he said, “sparked a revival that touched over 500 million people worldwide over a number of years. So, yes, one event could spark something.”

Maj. Gen. Dees, who retired in 2003 and has written extensively about the role of religion in American life, said, “I think there is strength when you have multiple religions represented in a particular nation. … I allow for others to believe as they believe. I think that’s part of America.”

More information on the event is available online

• Mark A. Kellner can be reached at mkellner@washingtontimes.com.

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