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Zimbabwe opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai speaks to the Associated Press after giving a press conference at his home in Harare, Zimbabwe, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017.  Tsvangirai said President Robert Mugabe must resign and called for a negotiated, inclusive transitional mechanism as well as comprehensive reforms before elections. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Coup in Zimbabwe

“Every great cause begins as a movement,” the television philosopher Eric Hoffer once observed (maybe), “becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket.” There’s some dispute about whether Mr. Hoffer ever actually said it, but there’s no dispute that it’s an accurate description of what happened to the Zimbabwe of Robert Mugabe.

NBC's Megyn Kelly interviews Juli Briskman, a former government contractor who was fired after she was photographed giving President Trump's motorcade the middle finger. (Image: "Megyn Kelly Today" screenshot)

The 100-grand salute

Salutes to the president can be monetized, and a middle-finger salute to a passing presidential motorcade can sometimes be worth more than a hundred grand. Is this a great country, or what?

Homeward-bound jihadis

War is hell, especially for the losers. Rather than winding up in a World War II-type concentration camp, defeated terrorists of ISIS are merely gathering up their wounded egos and bloody heads and heading home. Mom might be overjoyed to welcome the return of little Jihadi Joey, but the neighbors, not so much. When reauthorizing the nation’s surveillance code, Congress must make sure that in protecting the privacy of the law-abiding they don’t overlook the dangers posed by returning fighters who have lost the battle abroad but intend to continue the fight at home.

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore leaves after he speaks at a church revival, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, in Jackson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

The dilemma in Alabama

“You can’t beat Somebody with Nobody” is one of the first rules of politics, but occasionally Somebody is exposed as a wolf in borrowed clothes and Nobody wins by default. Nobody in Alabama is a man named Doug Jones, and a fortnight ago his chances of defeating Roy Moore were somewhere between Slim and None. And then Slim unexpectedly left town.

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington, at sunset. The Supreme Court is making new legal filings available online starting Monday, years behind the rest of the federal court system. Its a big step forward for an institution that has sometimes had just a glancing familiarity with technology. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

California and the Constitution

There’s a lot about the law and the Constitution that California does not understand, particularly the First Amendment. The U.S. Supreme Court, perhaps willing to offer the needed tutorial in the law, has agreed to hear a legal challenge to a California law requiring private pro-life pregnancy counseling centers to tell their clients that the state will provide an abortion instead.

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In this Sept. 6, 2017, photo, Anthony Pham, talks in his Monroe, Ga., barber shop. He became a U.S citizen in 1987, five years after he immigrated from Vietnam.   Now a business owner and proud Republican in Georgias staunchly conservative 10th Congressional District, Pham says he supports maintaining legal status for immigrants who arrived in the country illegally as children, the so-called Dreamers brought by adult family members.  (AP Photo/Bill Barrow)

Doing the right thing about DACA

Once upon a time the Constitution meant something to everybody. Every American took pride in a Constitution that was written in plain language that anyone, even a lawyer, could understand. Ours was "a nation of laws," not of judicial fiat or bureaucratic whim. That was the strength of the exceptional nation.

The unlikely romance on Capitol Hill

The Republican Congress of 2017 bears a remarkable resemblance to the New York Mets of 1962, their first year in baseball. The Mets couldn't hit the ball and they couldn't catch the ball and succeeded only in showing up for supper. Their manager, Casey Stengel, "the old perfessor," finally cried out in desperation: "Can't anybody here play this game?"

President Donald Trump pauses during a news conference with the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday Sept. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Thrown off the gravy train

The Environmental Protection Agency's gravy train just ain't what she used to be. Green groups are awestruck, agog and maybe even aghast at the news that the Trump administration has put a political operative to work vetting applications for EPA grants worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Washington State University College Republicans President Amir Rezamand, right, and his predecessor, James Allsup, second from right, who resigned after attending the Confederate monuments protest in Charlottesville, Va., talk with unidentified students during a small rally for Free Speech organized by the Washington State University chapter of Young Americans For Liberty on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Pullman, Wash. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

Regulating free speech

"Everybody talkin' 'bout heaven ain't goin' there," as the ancient spiritual of the black church in America warns, and that goes double about free speech. "Free speech" sounds good to just about everybody, but actual free speech is a brew too strong for everybody. Many meddlesome do-gooders applaud government-regulated speech and call it free speech. Everybody's free to say what the government says is OK to say. What's not free about that?

Vautrot's Cajun Cuisine shows the severe damage caused inside and out following heavy flooding, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Bevil Oaks, Texas. (Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP)

Fixing flood insurance in Harvey's wake

Hurricane Harvey took the most devastating flooding in the city's history to Houston, and the cost of repairing the damage will be astronomical. Sadly, the federal flood insurance program is already underwater and Harvey will only add to the flood of red ink. It's clear that Congress must reform the program so the premiums property owners pay more closely reflect the flood risk. Until that happens, nature's frequent fury will continue to undermine the finances of everyone.

FILE- In this Tuesday, April 5, 2016 file photo, an employee sorts Legos in the the new LEGO flagship store unveiled as part of the new Les Halles shopping mall during the press visit in Paris. Danish toy maker Lego said Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, it will cut 1,400 jobs, or about eight percent of its global workforce, after reporting a decline in sales and profits in the first half of 2017. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)

The maximum price of the minimum wage

It's easy to be generous with someone else's money. Politicians get away with it because the average American does not understand fundamental economics. Raising the minimum wage by law is popular because many people think no one has to pay the costs. When someone posts a reminder of how the world works, the ignorant scream.

People hold up a banner during an event to protest President Donald Trump's decision to revoke the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in Las Vegas. President Donald Trump on Tuesday began dismantling the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, the government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Waking up from an impossible dream

Complicated problems defy simple solutions, especially when the problems are deliberately created. The dilemma over what to do with children brought into the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, the so-called "Dreamers," is Exhibit A. They stand illegally on American soil in the impassive eyes of the law, but they're already American in their hearts. President Trump's decision to enact an "orderly wind-down" of executive amnesty for these Americans-of-the-heart sets the stage for a fair-minded solution to a long-standing immigration quandary.

Sen. Claire McCaskill

Fear stalks Democratic incumbents

A Texas politician once sneered that "the middle of the road is for yellow lines and dead armadillos." But it's also a haven, if only a temporary one, for politicians suddenly afraid of the life they've cultivated at the edge.

When a shoe doesn't fit, wear it anyway

Summer's nearly over, the first hurricane of the season has arrived with catastrophic force, and men will have to put away their white slacks and black-and-white spectators when they take them off Monday night. So it's time to think about shoes.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt (Associated Press)

Tales from the red-tape factory

The Environmental Protection Agency regards itself as the dispenser of the good and the just, protector of the snail darter and keeper of the land and everything on it. Anyone who questions this article of the faith can expect trouble.

Dancing on the debt ceiling

Washington knows how to turn melodrama into farce. That's the lowdown on the debt ceiling debate about to be served up on Capitol Hill. It would be a laugh if it were not so serious. The oft-repeated argument that the nation must keep overspending in order to stay on course leaves the sane shaking their heads. But without a correction of direction, the unpayable bill will come due and there will be no last laugh.

It's 4th and long for Colin

Dr. Johnson observed that "patriotism is the last refuge of scoundrels." Perhaps, but scoundrels have moved on. Crying "racism" when there is no racism is the work of modern scoundrels, and most of them are on the left.

White nationalist demonstrators use shields as they clash with counter demonstrators at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Aug. 12. (Associated Press)

The Charlottesville disease continues

Two weeks after the fact, the continuing hysteria over Charlottesville is more about the temperature of President Trump's denunciations (there have been several) of Nazis, Klansmen and other white supremacists than about the riot itself.

Lou Ferrigno

A super-hero to the rescue

Combative times require sturdy leaders, and the only reality we have comes from the world of entertainment. The word that Lou Ferrigno, aka the Hulk, may be joining the Trump administration via the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition,is just plain good news.

FILE - In this Sunday, April 9, 2017 file photo, two Swiss guards stand in front of St. Peter's Basilica prior to a Mass to be celebrated by Pope Francis, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican. The head of the Swiss Guards says the elite corps that protects the pope and the Vatican is ready to confront any terror attacks, following renewed threats against Rome by supporters of the Islamic State group following the Barcelona attack. Commander Christoph Graf told Swiss Catholic website cath.ch this week that "perhaps it is only a question of time before an attack like that happens in Rome. But we are ready also for this." (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, File)

A stroll into danger

April in Paris. Autumn in Rome. White nights in Stockholm and Oslo. All suggest long, languorous walks through Europe's great capitals. In Europe as nearly everywhere else, the cliche is true: the best way to see a city is on foot.