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President Donald Trump departs after signing an Executive Order that establishes a National Council for the American Worker during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, July 19, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The slow dance to peace

Ours is not an age for reflection, patience and slow-dancing. Our age demands instant gratification. Sooner than that, if possible. Thus the slow-dancing in the latest exchange since the famous Singapore handshake, originating in a hand-carried letter to Pyongyang. The response came back in another hand-carried letter, with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo continuing as postman.

FILE - In this July 11, 2018, file photo, Miami Marlins' Starlin Castro is mobbed by teammates after he hit a walk-off single in the 12th inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers, in Miami. The Marlins won 5-4. Just look at the standings: Thanks to a recent surge, the young Marlins (41-57) are not even last in the NL East. And opponents rave. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

A grand night for baseball

Baseball is the reason God made summer. Summer stretches out with the solace and symmetry of a long fly ball to deep center field, climbing ever higher and hanging in the sky as if the afternoon could go on forever. Whether watching a ball game from a box seat on the third-base line or through a hole in the right-field fence, we could only wish it would.

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Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the so-called Golden State Killer responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is arraigned, Friday, April 27, 2018, in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

The risk of diving into the gene pool

Genetic science has dramatically expanded the methods of bringing criminals to justice, but not every measurement is meant for prying eyes, and the dive into the gene pool can turn the lights on the good, the bad, the ugly and everyone in between. But there are costs.

Filthy rich, but not very smart

Sometimes "the filthy rich" among us do great and good things with their money. More than a few American towns and cities have libraries today because Andrew Carnegie, a steel baron of an earlier age, dedicated his wealth to getting them started. Many of Henry Ford's millions were dedicated to improving education, though some of those millions wound up in dubious places. Rockefeller millions and Walton millions have done much to enrich schools, museums and art galleries.

Kim Jong-un changes his tune

When Donald Trump sits down with Kim Jong-un sometime this spring he will do so against the backdrop of Kim's surprising love-in with President Moon Jae-in last week at Panmunjom, when the two leaders hugged, held hands and all but planted kisses on each other to make up for decades of mutual hostility on the Korean peninsula.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron walk from the Oval Office to a tree planting ceremony on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington, Monday, April 23, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

To a real nuclear deal

Human events sometimes seem to spill across the globe without rhyme or reason, but occasionally events converge in harmonic fashion, revealing a stunning opportunity.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron embrace at the conclusion of a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

France remembers

Donald Trump's romance with Emmanuel Macron continued to blossom Tuesday when they planted a tree together on the White House lawn. The French president brought the sapling, a cutting from the European Sessile oak, with him from Paris.

Another hurdle cleared

Abad novelist couldn't make this up: American politicians who pretended to sing only from the hymnbook of peace now want to spoil the best opportunity in three generations to pacify the warmongers of North Korea, and turn back the tide of nuclear proliferation which threatens us all. Their fuzzy rationale is that the mover of the promising breakthrough is Donald Trump, and the imperative of his enemies to destroy his presidency must come first. Seldom have political differences become so untethered from the reality of the common good.

In this April 18, 2018 photo, President Donald Trump listens during a news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club, in Palm Beach, Fla. The Democratic National Committee on Friday sued President Donald Trump's campaign, Trump's son, his son-in-law, the Russian Federation and WikiLeaks. The Democrats accuse the defendants of conspiring to help Trump win the 2016 presidential election after breaking into DNC computers and stealing tens of thousands of emails and documents. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Death to the inflation tax

There's new interest in indexing the capital gains tax to account for inflation. This is something good for everyone that conservatives have been pushing for years. The White House is working now to determine whether the president has the legal authority to make this change in tax policy by his own hand. There's evidence that he can.

Chinese President Xi Jinping talks with Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum Klaus Schwab during their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Monday, April 16, 2018. (Naohiko Hatta/Pool Photo via AP)

Good news from the front

President Trump invited hoots of ridicule from the elites from coast to coast (though not so much from the Great Lakes to the Gulf) when he said "trade wars are good, and easy to win." Nevertheless, with trade tensions bubbling between the United States and the People's Republic of China, the Trump administration has notched a couple of significant triumphs. That's a good thing, because a rebalancing of the Sino-American trade relationship is all to the good.

The Capitol Dome of the Capitol Building at sunrise, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Washington. After another government shutdown, congress has passed a sweeping long term spending bill which President Donald Trump is expected to sign later this morning. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Dancing around the budget

The typical congressman just can't help himself. He's the grown-up kid who fished his daddy's credit card out of his pants pocket while Daddy slept, and he has been the big man on the high-school campus since. This lack of self-restraint was further demonstrated last week when a vote on a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution failed once more.

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban speaks during an international press conference in the Parliament building in Budapest, Hungary Tuesday, April 10, 2018, two days after his Fidesz party in coalition with the Christian Democratic Party won a landslide vitory in the general elections. (Lajos Soos/MTI via AP)

Teaching Europe about democracy

Critics know what's wrong with the European Union. It suffers from what they call a "democratic deficit." Democracy is often loud, usually messy and everyone gets a voice. This is inconvenient for the elites and the bureaucrats.

Then-FBI Director Robert Mueller listens as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 13, 2013, as the House Judiciary Committee held an oversight hearing on the FBI. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

When anything goes

If Robert Mueller ever needs work, we would be happy to commend him to a school of journalism looking for a dean.

Demonstrators rally in support of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) outside the Capitol, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018, in Washington, on the second day of the federal shutdown. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) ** FILE **

No discounts for Dreamers

Life is not fair, as John F. Kennedy famously said, and sometimes it's not fair for everybody. The Arizona Supreme Court last week ruled that the "Dreamers," children brought to the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, are not eligible for in-state tuition rates at Arizona's three state universities and at its network of community colleges.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces to reporters he will not run for re-election and will retire next year at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 11, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The speaker exits

"Nice guys finish last" is part of the lore of baseball, an insight by Hall of Fame player and manager Leo Durocher, but it could be the epitaph for the Washington career of Paul Ryan, the speaker of the House who is widely praised for civility and good manners. He announced Wednesday that he's fed up and going home.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan faces a flurry of questions during an appearance on "Good Morning Britain," June 6, 2017. ("Good Morning Britain" screenshot) ** FILE **

Death at the point of a knife

Sadiq Khan is the mayor of London, who now sees the error of his earlier ways of enforcing the law. London is suffering a wave of murder, which is no stranger to Old Blighty, as fans of "Midsomer Murders" and other popular imported British television fare well know. But this murder in London is up close and personal, mayhem is often random, and there's getting to be more of it.

In this Jan. 3, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Navy, a Naval Station vessel, right, prepares to assist the future USS Omaha (LCS 12), a 218-foot-long littoral combat ship, pier side during a brief fuel stop in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The Omaha was conducting a change of homeport to San Diego, Calif. (Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class John Philip Wagner, Jr./U.S. Navy via AP)

No foxhole for an atheist

If the U.S. Navy appointed its first atheist chaplain, as the organized atheists demanded (twice), what could his duties as a chaplain be? Perhaps he could tell a sailor seeking spiritual solace in the face of death not to worry, he has no soul, anyway.

Ashlee Jones prepares coffee at a Philz Coffee shop in San Francisco, Friday, March 30, 2018. Coffee sellers will have to post ominous warnings in California because each cup contains a chemical linked to cancer, a judge ruled. The culprit is a byproduct of the bean roasting process that is a known carcinogen and has been at the heart of an eight-year legal struggle between a tiny nonprofit group and Big Coffee companies. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

The Hysteria State

The judge who ruled the other day that coffee purveyors in California must put a cancer-risk warning label on their beans calls to mind the old joke about the man, getting a little long in the tooth, who was told by his doctor that he would have to give up wine, women and song. "But Doc," he replied, "if I have to give up wine and women, what will I have to sing about?"

President Donald Trump speaks at a news conference with leaders of Baltic states in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 3, 2018.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The beckoning slam dunk

President Trump is disgusted by his signature on the $1.3 trillion omnibus spending bill he signed last month. He said so when he signed it. He noted, correctly, that the new law appropriates tens of billions of dollars of spending that the agencies don't need and even in some cases, don't want. (Who says bureaucrats can't push themselves away from the trough?)