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FILE - In this June 1, 2021, file photo, President Joe Biden speaks at the Greenwood Cultural Center in Tulsa, Okla. The Keystone XL is dead after a 12-year attempt to complete the partially built oil pipeline, yet the fight over Canadian crude rages on as emboldened environmentalists target other projects and pressure Biden to intervene — all while oil imports from the north keep rising. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

EDITORIAL: Biden's energy irony

When President Biden jetted off Wednesday for his first major foreign policy journey, the drag of his burdensome energy policy was such as to evoke wonder that Air Force One was able to get airborne.

President Joe Biden talks about the May jobs report from the Rehoboth Beach Convention Center in Rehoboth Beach, Del., Friday, June 4, 2021. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

EDITORIAL: Biden is not in sync with America

Joe Biden is far enough into his presidency that he now owns what happens. He can blame bad news on his predecessor but most voters -- especially those who are looking to him for leadership -- are evaluating his job performance on its own rather than comparatively.

The U.S. Capitol is seen as national guard members pass by on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 20, 2021. The House voted to create an independent commission on the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, sending the legislation to an uncertain future in the Senate. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

EDITORIAL: Democrats strain to harden the U.S. Capitol

Fear is the bitter fruit of the 2020 presidential election. It drove Donald Trump's supporters, afraid of losing their country, to march on the U.S. Capitol "peacefully and patriotically," until rioters hijacked their gathering. Just as the Jan. 6 violence was un-American, so is the ongoing attempt by disturbed Democrats to harden "the people's house."