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Judge Amy Barrett. (Associated Press)

The graveyard ghouls and a lather of speculation

- The Washington Times

Not all ghouls live in the graveyard. Some of them are busy in the capital sunshine, making book on Ruth Bader Ginsburg's chances of returning to the U.S. Supreme Court and staying there to assist in the rendering of Donald Trump and his administration as dead as one of those graveyard ghouls.

Nancy Pelosi. (Associated Press)

A tear for the schoolmarm teaching civics to the House

- The Washington Times

A schoolmarm's lot, like that of a policeman's, is not a happy one, particularly if her lot is a roomful of noisy children whose ignorance is boundless and who have only a small ambition to do anything about it. Shed a bipartisan tear for Nancy Pelosi.

Jimmy Carter. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A lot of noise before the storm

- The Washington Times

Thursday was a strange day in Washington. There was the changing, not of the guard but of half of the Congress, and Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats acted as if she were Franklin D. Roosevelt (in drag) and it was 1932 and "happy days are here again."

Elizabeth Warren   Associated Press photo

Witches, Presbyterians and the Booger Man

- The Washington Times

The Booger Man's gonna get you if you don't watch out. That's the media's message in the finding that at last there are more witches and wiccans than Presbyterians out there, waiting to pounce.

Theresa May

The lady at bay in Old Blighty

- The Washington Times

Theresa May, who has mismanaged Britain's exit from the European Union, won her vote of confidence in the House of Commons this week, and now she's in the hard place the country preacher found himself after winning a vote of confidence to unify his congregation, soothe hurt feelings and make peace with his deacons.

Harry S Truman at the piano with Lauren Bacall. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A modern president and his tweet stuff

- The Washington Times

Thomas Jefferson collected old books and French wines, Warren Harding collected poker buddies, and FDR collected stamps. Harry S Truman collected sheet music and played the piano. Once he played it at the National Press Club, with Lauren Bacall draped across the upright with a helping of cheesecake. Bess, the first lady, was not amused.

John Adams. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Civil is nice, but winning elections is better

- The Washington Times

Everybody wants to go to heaven, the wise man observed, but nobody wants to die. It's not a puzzlement. Everybody wants kind and gentle in our politics, but nobody wants to risk losing an election. That's not such a puzzlement, either.

A detail from a portrait of George H.W. Bush displayed inside the George H.W. Bush Library and Museum. (Associated Press)

No. 41, the real 'man in full'

- The Washington Times

No. 41 deserves all the warm, kind words he's getting, but they don't quite capture the man I got to know at the end of his presidency. The man in full emerged when the shadows began to lengthen, as they inevitably will for us all, and as the good days began to ebb.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A newer, hungrier kind of Democratic radical

- The Washington Times

Nobody is as insignificant in the Washington pecking order as a freshman member of Congress just off the turnip truck and into a maelstrom of ignorance and uncertainty all about him. One member of a freshman class of not so long ago recalls arriving at Reagan National Airport, finding his way through the terminal maze to curbside, and hailing a taxi.

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a press conference inside 10 Downing Street in London, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, Pool)

The politicians are having it tough in Old Blighty, too

- The Washington Times

Britain and the envious Europeans are discovering that breaking up is hard to do, particularly when the Europeans want to keep the house, the car, the bank account and give up only the kids. The particulars of the deal were written by the British themselves, so you might not understand why any of them wouldn't like it.

Judy Woodruff, anchor and managing editor of "PBS Newshour," takes part in a panel discussion during the 2018 Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton, Tuesday, July 31, 2018, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Doesn't anybody here respect us journalists?

- The Washington Times

The snowflake disease is catching. Donald Trump, of all people, tried to teach a couple of White House reporters a little needed manners this week and you might have thought he had repealed the First Amendment with an executive order.

Maxine Waters   Associated Press photo

So long to the end of the beginning

- The Washington Times

Just as soon as they get the dead carried out we can dispense with the last rites and continue the election that counts most. Ready or not, like it or not, the 2020 presidential election campaign begins this morning.

James Carville (Associated Press) ** FILE **

But is it still 'the economy, Stupid'?

- The Washington Times

We're about to see whether James Carville, the dark genius of Bill Clinton's presidential campaigns, knew what he was talking about when he posted the famous warning to the Clinton campaigners in the war room of campaign headquarters in Little Rock: "The economy, stupid."

Barack Obama (Associated Press)

When 'civility' becomes all the rage

- The Washington Times

Mr. Dooley wouldn't understand our politics at all. Someone asked Finley Peter Dunne's mythical Chicago bartender-cum-philosopher where he was going in such a hurry with a pair of brass knuckles.