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From left, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., respond to remarks by President Donald Trump after his call for the four Democratic congresswomen to go back to their "broken" countries, during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, July 15, 2019. All are American citizens and three of the four were born in the U.S. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The four noisy horseladies of the Apocalypse

- The Washington Times

Any man who makes it to 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is a smart guy, by definition. Climbing a greasy pole is impossible, as anyone who has tried it will tell you, and the presidency is the greasiest pole anywhere.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a Chicago Town Hall event at Chicago's Auditorium Theatre at Roosevelt University, Friday, June 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky) ** FILE **

Pity the professor adrift in the world of politics

- The Washington Times

There's all kind of reasons why Elizabeth Warren probably won't be president, and Claire McCaskill, her former colleague in the U.S. Senate, thinks she knows the reason why. Mrs. Warren, says Mrs. McCaskill, struggles with being "in command of policy" and still being "relatable."

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden arrives to speak with reporters outside a restaurant, Sunday, July 7, 2019, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)

The lynching of the only Democratic hope

- The Washington Times

Joe Biden got it right, it's just that he said it in the wrong country. In Joe's country, getting it right is wrong, and the unwary pay for it. In Joe's country, a sucker never gets an even break, and everybody's a sucker.

President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at the border village of Panmunjom in Demilitarized Zone, South Korea, Sunday, June 30, 2019. (Associated Press) **FILE**

The Trump-Kim flattery of convenience

- The Washington Times

Flattery, so the saying goes, will get you everywhere. This is wisdom usually employed by lovers, but Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un are trying to see whether it will work in statecraft. The stakes, like the risks, are large.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a Democratic primary debate hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, in Miami, as Sen. Cory Booker , D-N.J., and former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, listen. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

The noisy parade of the debutantes

- The Washington Times

The Democratic debates, so called, didn't accomplish much, but they might have struck a blow for valium. Valium is the calm-down pill that we should put in the water.

In this June 5, 2019, photo, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at the RV/MH Hall of Fame and Museum in Elkhart, Ind. Bernie Sanders has fallen to second place in most polls in the weeks since Joe Biden entered the presidential race. But Warren is emerging as another threat to his appeal, thanks in part to her populist proposals that at time go further left than Sanders on his key issues. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Here come the Democratic nobles on parade

- The Washington Times

The legion of Democrats who think they can take the measure of Donald Trump will go at it beginning Wednesday night, each trying to figure out a way to stand out in a crowd of mediocrities.

A man polishes the sign for The New York Times at the company's headquarters, July 18, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ** FILE **

Newspapers need to stop whining, restore trust with public

- The Washington Times

Newspapers are feeling under the gun. People don't want to pay for what they're selling. The sweet aroma of paper and ink, the bang and clatter of hundreds of typewriters that evaporated in the clouds of tobacco smoke that once made newsrooms dark and mysterious cave-like places, the thunder of rows of printing presses, must give way to timid tapping on plastic keyboards. The newspaper game is up.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during the I Will Vote Fundraising Gala Thursday, June 6, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Not quite a return of 'The Gong Show'

- The Washington Times

The Democrats are finally tuning up for the party's first presidential primary debates next week, and so far the only topics they can be expected to "debate" is who hates Donald Trump the most and who loves socialism the most. Nothing much to debate there.

President Donald Trump speaks on the South Lawn at the White House, Monday, June 10, 2019, in Washington as he honors Team Penske for the 2019 Indianapolis 500 win. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Why the deal with Mexico is a good one

- The Washington Times

It's not easy being a Democrat, and it's even more difficult to be a leader in the party, a speaker of the House or the leader of the minority in the Senate. It's true that hard times can make a monkey eat red pepper, as the ancient wisdom goes, but Democratic hard times are encouraging a rare run on red pepper.

Queen Elizabeth II

Pomp, fakery, shock, rage, and crisis averted

- The Washington Times

Another crisis lies behind us. The New York Times had reported that Donald Trump was, all by himself, plotting to destroy the Special Relationship with Britain, and The Washington Post reported unidentified troop movements near Yorktown, believed to be remnants of the British army surrendered by Gen. Cornwallis, marching on the capital to avenge Mr. Trump's various insults in London.

William Shakespeare

Who will answer when a nation calls for greatness

- The Washington Times

Nations are raised to greatness through the virtues of great men, as Edmund Burke observed, and Britain could once call on the likes of Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher when the hour of greatest peril arrived.

Special counsel Robert Mueller speaks at the Department of Justice Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Washington, about the Russia investigation. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Robert Mueller just wants to feel the love again

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller just wants to feel the love again. His press clippings have faded and life hasn't been the same for the man choking on rectitude and righteousness, not since he turned in his account of the vain pursuit of Donald Trump and the Russians. After more than two years trying to find the president in bed with Vladimir Putin, he didn't even find the bed.

In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Another colluder with Russia called to account

- The Washington Times

Julian Assange continues to be a pain in sensitive places, from the neck to the unmentionable nether regions. Mr. Assange is clearly in serious legal trouble. The charges against him, contained in a 17-count indictment that says he "received and published" classified intelligence, are "jail-y," and probably for a long time.

Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden during a campaign rally at Eakins Oval in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Joe Biden's rumble in the jungle of empty rhetoric

- The Washington Times

Pity good ol' Joe Biden. He's eager at last to master the hounds, to impose order in the kennel. He wants to encourage the amiable golden retrievers, collies and cocker spaniels in his care, and he has to throw a little raw meat to the rabid pit bulls. How can he do that and escape with his life, too?

This photo made available by the U.S. National Archives shows the first page of the United States Constitution. (National Archives via AP)

The most important 44 words in the Constitution

- The Washington Times

The First Amendment to the Constitution, the most important 44 words in that priceless and precious promise of liberty and freedom, does not guarantee civil, wise or even responsible speech. It guarantees free speech, however goofy, dumb or even irresponsible.