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Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden is Editor-In-Chief Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden's first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now-defunct Arkansas Gazette, where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1993, managing editor in 1985 and editor in chief in 1992. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden retired in January 2008 and became editor in chief emeritus. He writes "Pruden on Politics," a twice-weekly column in The Washington Times.

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Articles by Wesley Pruden

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during the I Will Vote Fundraising Gala Thursday, June 6, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Not quite a return of 'The Gong Show'

The Democrats are finally tuning up for the party's first presidential primary debates next week, and so far the only topics they can be expected to "debate" is who hates Donald Trump the most and who loves socialism the most. Nothing much to debate there. Published June 17, 2019

President Donald Trump speaks on the South Lawn at the White House, Monday, June 10, 2019, in Washington as he honors Team Penske for the 2019 Indianapolis 500 win. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Why the deal with Mexico is a good one

It's not easy being a Democrat, and it's even more difficult to be a leader in the party, a speaker of the House or the leader of the minority in the Senate. It's true that hard times can make a monkey eat red pepper, as the ancient wisdom goes, but Democratic hard times are encouraging a rare run on red pepper. Published June 10, 2019

Queen Elizabeth II

Pomp, fakery, shock, rage, and crisis averted

Another crisis lies behind us. The New York Times had reported that Donald Trump was, all by himself, plotting to destroy the Special Relationship with Britain, and The Washington Post reported unidentified troop movements near Yorktown, believed to be remnants of the British army surrendered by Gen. Cornwallis, marching on the capital to avenge Mr. Trump's various insults in London. Published June 6, 2019

William Shakespeare

Who will answer when a nation calls for greatness

Nations are raised to greatness through the virtues of great men, as Edmund Burke observed, and Britain could once call on the likes of Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher when the hour of greatest peril arrived. Published June 3, 2019

Special counsel Robert Mueller speaks at the Department of Justice Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Washington, about the Russia investigation. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Robert Mueller just wants to feel the love again

Robert Mueller just wants to feel the love again. His press clippings have faded and life hasn't been the same for the man choking on rectitude and righteousness, not since he turned in his account of the vain pursuit of Donald Trump and the Russians. After more than two years trying to find the president in bed with Vladimir Putin, he didn't even find the bed. Published May 30, 2019

In this May 1, 2019, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange puts his fist up as he is taken from court in London. The Justice Department has charged Assange with receiving and publishing classified information. The charges are contained in a new, 18-count indictment announced May 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Another colluder with Russia called to account

Julian Assange continues to be a pain in sensitive places, from the neck to the unmentionable nether regions. Mr. Assange is clearly in serious legal trouble. The charges against him, contained in a 17-count indictment that says he "received and published" classified intelligence, are "jail-y," and probably for a long time. Published May 27, 2019

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street to attend the weekly session of Prime Ministers Questions in Parliament in London, Wednesday, May 22, 2019. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Theresa May 'dead in the water' for weeks

The lady is clearly in distress, and no one's there to help her. Only a churl would say, even if true, Theresa May brought it on herself. Published May 23, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden during a campaign rally at Eakins Oval in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Joe Biden's rumble in the jungle of empty rhetoric

Pity good ol' Joe Biden. He's eager at last to master the hounds, to impose order in the kennel. He wants to encourage the amiable golden retrievers, collies and cocker spaniels in his care, and he has to throw a little raw meat to the rabid pit bulls. How can he do that and escape with his life, too? Published May 20, 2019

This photo made available by the U.S. National Archives shows the first page of the United States Constitution. (National Archives via AP)

The most important 44 words in the Constitution

The First Amendment to the Constitution, the most important 44 words in that priceless and precious promise of liberty and freedom, does not guarantee civil, wise or even responsible speech. It guarantees free speech, however goofy, dumb or even irresponsible. Published May 16, 2019

British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in London, to attend Prime Minister's Questions at the Houses of Parliament, Wednesday, May 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Time runs out on the exit from Europe

It's foolish to compare the politics of Britain to the politics in America, kissin' cousins though we may be. The music is similar, but not the words. Published May 13, 2019

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., talks to the media at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 2, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

A fever subsides, leaving Democrats to focus on 2016

Nancy Pelosi seems to be getting her wish. Mrs. Pelosi's tutorials to her girls gone wild about how the world works, and in particular how the world of Washington works, may be having an effect. The tutorial required a lot of remedial readin,' writin' and 'rithmetic. The impeachment fever is clearly subsiding. Trump Derangement Syndrome is reasserting itself as the preferred narcotic in the Democratic congressional salons. Published May 6, 2019

President Donald Trump speaks during a National Day of Prayer event in the Rose Garden of the White House, Thursday, May 2, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

When the third time is not the charm

In the beginning, it was collusion with the Russians that the Democrats were counting on to send the president to obscurity, or worse. When that partisan fantasy dissolved like snow on a sunny day, the Democrats seized obstruction of justice as the crime of the century. The special counsel concluded there was not enough there, either. Published May 2, 2019

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks outside of Gianni's Pizza, in Wilmington Del., Thursday, April 25, 2019. (Jessica Griffin/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

'Sleepy Joe' shakes up the Geezer Primary

The Democrats are the gift that never quits giving. Twenty-five Democrats (depending on who's counting) think they're capable of running the country and Thursday the party that can't shoot straight gave us a presidential primary within a presidential primary. Published April 25, 2019

Former U.S. President Barack Obama attends a town hall meeting at the "European School For Management And Technology" (ESMT) in Berlin, Germany, Saturday, April 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

In certain precincts, we're all snowflakes now

When Muslim terrorists brought down the World Trade Center 17 years ago, the Paris newspapers, in a fit of empathy, declared that "we're all Americans now." The sentiment was meaningless treacle, and it quickly evaporated. American citizenship, even if honorary, is too great a burden for Frenchmen to bear. But it was a nice gesture. Published April 22, 2019

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers construction and maintenance conference in Washington, April 5, 2019. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) ** FILE **

An imaginary look at an imaginary 2020 election

The polls haven't yet opened, and it's already time to count the ballots. Everybody wants to know who won next year. It's not much of a horse race yet, but we've got a lot of horses, even if most of them will eventually run straight to the glue works. Published April 15, 2019

Julian Assange gestures as he arrives at Westminster Magistrates' Court in London, after the WikiLeaks founder was arrested by officers from the Metropolitan Police and taken into custody Thursday, April 11, 2019. Police in London arrested WikiLeaks founder Assange at the Ecuadorian Embassy Thursday for failing to surrender to the court in 2012, shortly after the South American nation revoked his asylum. (Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

The WikiLeaker is about to face melancholy music

Finally being called to account for crimes and other outrages ruins any villain's day, and Julian Assange's bad day started early Thursday, when he was pulled out of bed at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London and packed off to considerably smaller and less plush living quarters in the pokey. He did not go gently into that rainy English morning. Published April 11, 2019