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Eric Althoff

Articles by Eric Althoff

Director Aaron Sorkin arrives at the Premiere of "Molly's Game" at the 2017 AFI Fest Closing Night on Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

Aaron Sorkin, ‘West Wing’ creator and director of ‘Molly’s Game,’ calls D.C. a great place to film

Aaron Sorkin has a bit of a history with the nation's capital. The creator of "The West Wing" and writer who adapted his play "A Few Good Men" into an award-winning 1992 film extols Washington, D.C., as a terrific -- though logistically difficult -- place to make a film. "Molly's Game" might at first seem a bit outside his typical gravitation to politics, but it certainly adheres to Mr. Sorkin's obsession with power and how it changes those who wield it. Published November 28, 2017

This image released by Focus Features shows Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in a scene from "Darkest Hour." (Jack English/Focus Features via AP)

Gary Oldman, star of ‘Darkest Hour,’ says actors playing Churchill should start a club together

Gary Oldman, who portrays Winston Churchill in the new film "Darkest Hour," said that a statue of the late British leader in often encased "in a box" during protests in London's Parliament Square, not far from where the prime minister conferred in his underground bunkers with England's war cabinet during the Second World War. In "Darkest Hour," Mr. Oldman portrays the statesman right as he becomes the prime minister in 1940, just as the Nazi machine is preparing to bomb London. Published November 22, 2017

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is interviewed by a reporter at the Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Terry McAuliffe to give opening speech at Pocahontas Reframed Native American film festival

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe will deliver the opening night address at the Pocahontas Reframed Native American Storytellers Film Festival Friday evening. The festival, part of the legacy project of Virginia's American Evolution 2019 Commemoration, includes films by American Indian filmmakers as well as narratives and documentaries about their contributions to early and ongoing American culture. Published November 16, 2017

This image released by Lionsgate shows Jacob Tremblay, left, and Julia Roberts in a scene from "Wonder." (Dale Robinette/Lionsgate via AP)

‘Wonder’ film adapted from book explores bullying and good kids making tough decisions

One day author R.J. Palacio sat outside a New York ice cream parlor with her son when a young girl sat down beside her. However, unlike other girls her age, this one had pronounced facial scars and deformities. Her manuscript, "Wonder," was published in 2012, and followed a fictional boy named Auggie who, due to a difficult birth, bears many of the deformities Ms. Palacio observed on that mysterious New York youngster years earlier. Fearful of venturing out in the open world, Auggie maintains a healthy fantasy life, and ventures outside only under cover of an astronaut's helmet gifted by his father. Published November 13, 2017

This cover image released by BMG shows "In///Parallel," the latest release by Dhani Harrison. (BMG via AP)

Dhani Harrison tours behind his first solo album

Dhani Harrison initially hid behind his family name in a band called Thenewno2 given that the son of Beatle George Harrison wanted to be taken seriously on his own musical merits. He also wanted, he said, to get his music heard "without people having some preconceived idea or comparing you." Published October 31, 2017

This image released by DreamWorks Pictures shows Miles Teller in a scene from,"Thank You for Your Service." The drama follows a group of U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq who struggle to integrate back into family and civilian life. (DreamWorks Pictures via AP)

Military veterans and PTSD explored in new film ‘Thank You for Your Service’

Adam Schumman returned from Iraq a changed man. His story caught the interest of Washington Post reporter David Finkel, who wrote a nonfiction account of Mr. Schumann's and his platoon mates' return home in a book called "Thank You for Your Service." That book is now a major motion picture starring Miles Teller ("Whiplash," "Divergent") and written and directed by Jason Hall, whose previous script for "American Sniper" became the worldwide phenomenon directed by Clint Eastwood. Published October 23, 2017

In a Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017 file photo, Bill Pullman attends a premiere for "Battle of the Sexes" on day 4 of the Toronto International Film Festival at the Ryerson Theatre, in Toronto. On Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, the “Independence Day” actor was the recipient of the Excellence in Acting Award at the Woodstock Film Festival last Saturday night in Kingston, in New York’s Hudson Valley. The Daily Freeman reports that after being handed the award, Pullman placed it on a shelf attached to the lectern on the stage. As Pullman began to speak, he jostled the lectern, causing the award to topple to the floor and break in two pieces. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

‘Spaceballs’ sequel possibility a ‘ticking clock,’ says star Bill Pullman

Rumors have swirled for years of a "Spaceballs" sequel -- which gained traction this summer when Mr. Brooks told an audience in Newark, New Jersey, that MGM was interested given the success of the new "Star Wars" films. "It's the ticking clock of all time, isn't it?" Bill Pullman, who starred in 1987 film, said. Published October 17, 2017

This image released by Open Road Films shows, from left, Josh Gad, Chadwick Boseman and Sterling K. Brown in a scene from "Marshall." (Barry Wetcher/Open Road Films via AP)

Thurgood Marshall’s early life as lawyer portrayed by Chadwick Boseman in ‘Marshall’

Thurgood Marshall enjoys a prominent place in the National Museum of African American History and Culture. But long before he took his seat on the nation's highest court, the Baltimore native was a scrappy attorney who argued civil rights cases around the country. One of those earlier cases took Marshall to Connecticut in 1940, where a rich white woman accused her black chauffeur of rape. Something about the case didn't jibe, and Marshall was determined to uncover the truth, no matter how painful. Published October 12, 2017

(Forces of Geek)

Scam artist Joey Skaggs shows how he fooled media in ‘Art of the Prank’

Joey Skaggs may have fooled more people than Frank Abagnale Jr., the subject of "Catch Me if You Can." Mr. Skaggs now faces the camera in "Art of the Prank," relating how he and a trusted troupe of scam artist actors and cohorts successfully duped the public year after year after year. (One could even say he was the forerunner of Captain Janks, Howard Stern's favorite faux news source.) Published October 10, 2017

Breast Cancer Awareness Month sees Outer Banks resort give free massages

The Sanderling Resort, located in North Carolina's scenic Outer Banks between Currituck Sound and the Atlantic Ocean, is participating in Breast Cancer Awareness Month with its "Passion for Pink" spa promotion. Every Tuesday through October, the Spa at Sanderling will offer free treatments to Outer Banks residents who are fighting breast cancer or have done so in the past. Published October 8, 2017

This image released by warner Bros. Pictures shows Ryan Gosling, left, and Harrison Ford in a scene from "Blade Runner 2049." (Stephen Vaughan/Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

FILM REVIEW: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ a vast improvement over 1982 original

"2049" picks up three decades after the 1982 original, which saw L.A. detective Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) hunting down "Replicants," humanoids made to look and seem like real people -- a subcaste slave labor. Mr. Ford's Deckard is nowhere to be seen as "2049" opens on a bleak, sun-drenched California pastoral of the future, with Officer K (Ryan Gosling) awakened in his flying car just as he is about to touch down at the farm of Sapper Morton (Dave Bautista, whose talents far outweigh his past as a WWE wrestler). Published October 7, 2017

Disabled veterans honored at National Day of Honor in D.C.

Disabled veterans were honored Thursday at the Inaugural Commemoration of the National Day of Honor for American Veterans Disabled for Life, held at the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial. Speakers included Secretary of Veterans Affairs David J. Shulkin and Sen. Tammy Duckworth, the Illinois Democrat who lost her legs and the partial use of her right arm when a helicopter she was piloting in Iraq was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade. Published October 5, 2017