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R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is the founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and a New York Times best-selling author. He makes frequent appearances on national television and is a nationally syndicated columnist, whose articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Sun, The Washington Times, National Review, Harper's, Commentary, The (London) Spectator, Le Figaro (Paris) and elsewhere.

Articles by R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Target of the Democrats Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the migraine for Republicans

It has long been my conviction that Democrats are the more adept pols, the most tireless pols, the most political pols. I have said that their political libido is that of a nymphomaniac. By that I mean to compliment them, at least to compliment their political skills. The political libido of the Republicans is by comparison the political libido of a Victorian lady, complete with white gloves and parasol. Published November 14, 2017

Illustration on the decay of the Democrat Party by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donna Brazile sees the light

After more than two decades of writing about the Clintons, it is pretty dispiriting to see how my friends, the Democrats, have ignored my findings about that rapacious couple. Published November 7, 2017

Illustration on Harvey Weinstein by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sex, the progressives' problem

"Sex is a beautiful thing." Remember that solemnity being intoned endlessly by the sex prophets of the 1960s, '70s and '80s? Of course, the more recent prophets were preceded by the sexual psychopaths of the 1920s and '30s. There is a long history to the absurdity of sexual utopia. Published October 31, 2017

Yankee Doodle Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump, a Yankee Doodle Dandy

Regarding the imbroglio caused by the Hon. Frederica S. Wilson, representing her constituency in South Florida and apparently the entire African-American race in America plus anyone else who hates President Trump, my research has uncovered something interesting. Published October 24, 2017

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey's shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein's initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton's eventual response to the scandal. I say "eventual response" because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary's lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully. Published October 17, 2017

Susan Melton is comforted by James Warren Melton as she takes her seat before her son Sonny Melton's funeral at Big Sandy High School, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017,  in Big Sandy, Tenn. Melton, a registered nurse, died protecting his wife during the Las Vegas shooting massacre.  (Morgan Timms /The Jackson Sun via AP)

Revering life after Las Vegas

In the aftermath of the most deadly massacre in American history a friend asks: "Why would God allow a man to wreak so much carnage?" And the enormous violence clearly weakened my friend's belief in God. It should not have weakened his belief in God. Who else or what other agent is around to take the place of the Uncaused Cause? Published October 10, 2017

Illustration on Joe Biden by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Democratic front-runner for 2020

I have been trying to warn President Trump, but to no avail. I have been trying to caution him about his tweets, but to little effect. Not that they are all that alarming to normal people. Not that they are without their own special charm. In a world filled with Republicans and Independents, most of his tweets would be informative and even amusing. Yet in a world that also includes Democrats, frankly, they are risky. The Democrats have no sense of humor and many are alarmists. Published October 3, 2017

American Spectator Banner Still Flying Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Celebrity editors flee magazines they leave in literary ruins

On the occasion of my 50th anniversary of founding and editing The American Spectator, I feel moved to reflect on the parlous condition of the magazine business. We celebrated our anniversary just last night, and naturally I composed my reflections before the event. What makes this column something more than an occasion for indulgence is that the sickly condition of magazines is, of a sudden, a hot news item. Published September 26, 2017

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Hillary, here is what happened'

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons' 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a "meltdown." That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City's Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself. Published September 19, 2017

Illustration on the politicization of Hurricane Irma by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The anger of the hurricane media

Here we sit in the comfort of Washington and we read of the discomfort in Florida. There a massive storm moved from the Caribbean north through South Florida, displacing as many as 5 million people. Published September 12, 2017

Illustration on thoughts about FDR over Labor Day weekend by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

With Roosevelt on Labor Day

Labor Day weekend passed with soggy weather in Washington. It was not as soggy as in other parts of the United States, but it kept me indoors most of the time, and so I decided to give some thought to the one American president whom I associate with Labor Day, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Actually to be historically correct, I should associate President Grover Cleveland -- a conservative Democrat -- with Labor Day, for he was the first to make it a national holiday. Yet for some reason it is associated with FDR, at least in my mind. Published September 5, 2017

Trump's Baloney Detector Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's baloney detector annoys his critics

President Trump is in trouble again with his moral superiors. His problem, of course, is that he cannot throttle his baloney detector. Mr. Trump, it seems, at some point in life acquired a baloney detector that has usually served him well. It certainly served him well during his long years in business and during his brief time in politics. Now, however, it is problematic. Published August 22, 2017

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, "Sieg Heil!" What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites? Published August 15, 2017

Illustration on Hillary and the resist movement      The Washington Times

Fifty years of 'resistance'

I have experienced defeat in presidential politics many times. Actually, I expect most Americans have. You win some and you lose some. Published August 8, 2017

In this July 21, 2017 photo, incoming White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci, right, blowing a kiss after answering questions during the press briefing in the Brady Press Briefing room of the White House in Washington. Scaramucci is out as White House communications director after just 11 days on the job.  A person close to Scaramucci confirmed the staffing change just hours after President Donald Trumps new chief of staff, John Kelly, was sworn into office. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Removing the 'Scar'

Luigi Barzini, my old pal and the author of so many fine books all written from his aerie above Rome -- and his finest, "The Italians," he wrote in English -- once jolted me by saying, "You Americans talk too much." Of course, he said it with affection. Back in the days of the Cold War, he was one of the few European intellectuals who really understood and admired America. What provoked him, however, was the famous euphemism of American politicians. Published August 1, 2017

Rob Goldstone About to Get Busted Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who is colluding with whom?

In the Russia-Trump imbroglio let us be clear. We are now months into it. A dozen or so culprits have been fingered, some being actually quite amusing. You will be seeing more of the fat British music promoter, Rob Goldstone, who has been photographed wearing a baseball hat emblazoned with a word denoting a type of female anatomy on it. Published July 25, 2017

Left Wing University Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When institutions drift left

I have recently been reminded of one of my earliest conclusions about the American left. I arrived at that conclusion when what we now call the left was relatively civilized. We called it, in those days, American liberalism, but even then it was fla fla. Published July 18, 2017

Illustration on the new "Resistance" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The American left's downward spiral

I have returned. From Europe, that is, and I hope I met with no Russian undercover agents while there. The soi-disant liberals are in a snit about the Russians. Supposedly, Donald Trump Jr. and the mysterious Jared Kushner met with an undercover agent of the Kremlin in June of last year, and they did not report their meeting to The Powers That Be. Published July 11, 2017

Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama's time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes. Published June 27, 2017