Ron Paul praises Edward Snowden and defends the Fourth Amendment

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Ron Paul is definitely not done yet. Now chairman of the Campaign for Liberty, the former congressman and independent presidential hopeful has spoken out against government collection of phone and internet data and the dramatic circumstances that brought the situation to public radar.

“The Fourth Amendment is clear; we should be secure in our persons, houses, papers, and effects, and all warrants must have probable cause. Today the government operates largely in secret, while seeking to know everything about our private lives - without probable cause and without a warrant,” Dr. Paul says.

“The government does not need to know more about what we are doing. We need to know more about what the government is doing,” he notes.

“We should be thankful for individuals like Edward Snowden and Glenn Greenwald who see injustice being carried out by their own government and speak out, despite the risk. They have done a great service to the American people by exposing the truth about what our government is doing in secret.”

There is already an unrelated connection here, incidentally. After examining Federal Election Commission records, Open Secrets - a watchdog that tracks money in politics - revealed Monday that Mr. Snowden donated $500 to Dr. Paul’s campaign in 2012.

In an appearance on CNN, Dr. Paul also asked, “What is the penalty for people who deliberately destroy the Constitution and rationalize and say, ‘Oh, we have to do it for security.’ Well, frankly, you end up losing - you lose your security and you lose your freedoms too.”

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