Sandy socks East Coast

Swirling from the nation’s capital to New England, a hurricane-fueled superstorm struck the most populous region of the United States on Monday with the type of brute force that had been predicted for days, flooding roads and knocking out power to thousands in the D.C. region.

Backpackers Dean Siornicke, left, and Leland Kinkade of Spring Hill, Fla., arrive at a trailhead after spending a snowy night Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, near v, Tenn. About 50 backpackers took shelter in the park during Sunday night's snowfall. Rangers expect more snow and high winds in the days to come as fallout from the storm pounding the East Coast.(AP Photo/Knoxville News Sentinel, J. Miles Cary)

Backpackers Dean Siornicke, left, and Leland Kinkade of Spring Hill, Fla., arrive at a trailhead after spending a snowy night Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, near v, Tenn. About 50 backpackers took shelter in the park during Sunday night's snowfall. Rangers expect more snow and high winds in the days to come as fallout from the storm pounding the East Coast.(AP Photo/Knoxville News Sentinel, J. Miles Cary)

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