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Marchand went around the back of the net and wrapped it around for the backhand. Roberto Luongo stopped the opening salvo with his stick, but in the aftermath of the initial save the puck rolled over the goal line.

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It’s the kind of game that bodes well for the Canucks, but the Bruins still lead 1-0 midway through the second period.

Boston’s wins had all been high-scoring blowouts, while the low-scoring, one-goal games have all gone Vancouver’s way. And yet here we are.

Alex Burrows had another good chance for the Canucks, drawing Tim Thomas out to cut down the angle and then sliding across the slot from the left to the right. With Thomas so far out, it was a long trip and he couldn’t track Burrows. But Zdeno Chara was there to block the shot and protect the 1-0 lead.

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The first period is over, and the Bruins are up 1-0.

Although it’s true the team scoring first has won every game, that doesn’t mean there haven’t been any lead changes. Vancouver took a 1-0 lead in Game 2, but the Bruins scored twice in a row to take the lead before the Canucks came back to tie it with about 10 minutes left in the game.

Then, Alex Burrows needed only 11 seconds in overtime to win it.

In every other game of the series, the team that scored first never trailed. Three of them have been shutouts.

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The Bruins are on the board first.

Patrice Bergeron redirected a centering pass from Brad Marchand past Roberto Luongo with 5:23 left in the first period to give Boston a 1-0 lead of Game 7 of the Stanley Cup finals.

The team that scored first has won each of the first six games.

Marchand got to the corner first after a faceoff in the Canucks zone and circled back before finding Bergeron. It’s Marchand’s fifth goal of the playoffs and the eighth assist of the postseason for the rookie Marchand.

Story Continues →