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Mickelson, who is No. 8 in the Ryder Cup standings going into the final week of qualifying, came out firing into the wind with a 4-iron to about 2 feet and then a driver off the fairway to give himself a decent chance at birdie on the 11th. He didn’t advance any further up the leaderboard. He also didn’t fall too far back, and that was just as important. He was in the group at even-par 144, not knowing what the weekend will hold.

McDowell had a 76 and was tied with Mickelson, still only four shots behind.

“I was very happy to get off that golf course, I have to say,” McDowell said. “I’m trying to think of the last time I remember a golf course playing this difficult, because it’s a links wind, blowing across a golf course which is super soft, with some of the most difficult pins on the course out there. It’s brutal.”

Daly, who opened with a 68, bogeyed his first three holes and shot 77. Even so, he was only five shots behind.

Woods was not immune to the windy conditions. With a sand wedge in his hand on the third, he knocked it over the green and appeared headed for bogey until his 20-foot par putt was true all the way. He looked solid on par putts at No. 5 and No. 7, and his chip from below the ridge on the ninth stopped a turn from falling.

He never looked as if he would miss, even rolling in a 12-foot par putt on the 17th. The only big blip came at the 18th, his second bogey of the round. Already this week, the PGA statisticians have Woods for 23 one-putt greens. Asked if there was a putting performance that stood out among his 14 majors, he cited the 1997 Masters and 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. He won those two by a combined 27 shots.

Then again, he had put some distance between him and the field.

This PGA Championship remains wide open, and so much depends on whether the wind continues to blow, and the scores continue to soar.

Doug Wade, a club pro from Dayton, Ohio, had a 93. That was one shot away from the PGA Championship record for the worst score. Michael Frye, a club pro from Sedona, Ariz., finished par-birdie-par on three of the tougher holes for a 90.

They weren’t alone, of course. Hunter Mahan and Rickie Fowler had 80, Matt Kuchar an 82, and Nick Watney an 81. It was a long list of suffering, so difficult that no one would embarrassed or angry. Most were just happy to be off the golf course.

“If you had a golf course like this and you asked me to go and play golf in windy conditions, I’d say, ‘No, I’m not going to play.’ I guess nobody is going to go out and play in conditions like this,” Singh said. “But it’s a major, and we have to go out there and just struggle and manage yourself the best you can.”