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Ben S. Carson

Ben S. Carson

Opinion Columnist — Internationally renowned physician Ben Solomon Carson, M.D. is a retired neurosurgeon, an emeritus professor of neurosurgery, oncology, plastic surgery, and pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and a Washington Times columnist. A pediatric brain surgeon who was the first to successfully separate conjoined twins joined at the head, Dr. Carson has become a popular conservative figure and leader for his views on social issues and the federal government following his speech at the 2013 National Prayer Breakfast. In 2008, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush, the highest civilian honor in the land. Dr. Carson has also received more than 60 honorary doctorate degrees and dozens of national merit citations, written over 100 neurosurgical publications, and authored six best-selling books.

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Articles by Ben S. Carson

FILE - In this June 16, 2014 file photo, demonstrators chant pro-Islamic State group slogans as they carry the group's flags in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, Iraq. Despite the atrocities that made it notorious, the Islamic State group depicts itself as bringing a reign of justice and equality for Muslims under its radical version of Shariah law. But Syrians who have escaped its rule say public disillusionment is growing with jihadi fighters who have become an elite class. (AP Photo, File)

The face of evil

The graphic pictures of the Jordanian pilot being burned alive by Islamic State militants were chilling and raised doubts about the humanity of the Islamic terrorists capable of such barbarism. This coupled with beheadings and crucifixions gives us a better understanding of the evil we along with the rest of the world are facing. Published January 31, 2016

Republican presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson talks to the media and guests during a private campaign stop in Waco, Texas, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016.  (Rod Aydelotte/Waco Tribune-Herald via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

A prescription for achievement and empowerment

In 1894, Frederick Douglass spoke of the blessings of an education. He said: "Education means emancipation. It means light and liberty. It means the uplifting of the soul of man into the glorious light of truth, the light by which men can only be made free." Published January 13, 2016

Ben Carson's campaign shrugged off the Club for Growth's findings, dismissing its methods and conclusions. (Associated Press)

Preventing gun violence and preserving the Second Amendment

The recent shootings that took place at Umpqua Community College, Northern Arizona University, and Texas Southern University were tragic, and we pray for the victims and their devastated families who have been hurting so badly. Published October 27, 2015

Republican presidential candidate, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson speaks during the Values Voter Summit, held by the Family Research Council Action, Friday, Sept. 25, 2015, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) ** FILE **

What if all lives mattered?

It all started with a tweet. Monica Foy, a student at Sam Houston State University decided to tell the world how she felt. Published September 28, 2015

Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof is escorted from the Cleveland County Courthouse in Shelby, N.C. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)

Call it racism

Not everything is about race in this country. But when it is about race, then it just is. Published July 27, 2015

Heavy Handed HUD Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Experimenting with failed socialism again

Remember busing, that brilliant social experiment that was to usher in a new era of racial utopia in America? Undaunted by the failed socialist experiments of the 1980s, the Obama administration has recently implemented a new Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) rule designed to "desegregate" housing by withholding funds from communities that fail to demonstrate their projects "affirmatively further" fair housing. Published July 23, 2015

Illustration on entering the presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The learning curve of a candidate

As we stand about 20 months out from Election Day 2016, I have much to learn in terms of becoming both a better candidate and a better potential president of the United States. I do not take the opportunity lightly. Published March 24, 2015

Phyllis Schlafly Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Applauding an elegant conservative

Recently, I was temporarily placed on the Southern Poverty Law Center's watch list for extremism simply because I vocally support traditional marriage. I remember thinking: When did advocating for lifelong love between one man and one woman become a hate crime? Fortunately, the group saw the folly of its ways and apologized, removing me from the list. Published February 24, 2015

Victory at all Costs Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The face of evil

The graphic pictures of a Jordanian pilot being burned alive by militants from the Islamic State, or ISIS, were chilling and raised doubts about the humanity of the Islamic terrorists capable of such barbarism. This coupled with beheadings and crucifixions gives us a better understanding of the evil we, along with the rest of the world, are facing. Published February 17, 2015

Illustration by Linas Garsys

Vaccinations are for the good of everyone

There has been much debate recently over vaccination mandates, particularly in response to the measles outbreak currently taking place throughout the country. Published February 10, 2015

Higher Education, Higher Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The payoff of a good education

Televised "man on the street" interviews, which are often the source of much laughter, are also frequently quite disturbing. Basic questions are asked about significant or historical events, and it becomes rapidly apparent that many of our fellow citizens have not applied themselves to the acquisition of knowledge and basic information. Published February 3, 2015

Community Outreach through Athletics Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Choosing the challenging road to reconciliation

A few days ago I had the pleasure of sitting down with Edward Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association of the New York Police Department, to discuss potential ways of improving community-police relationships. He has been working with outstanding community leaders like Pastor A.R. Bernard, and they sincerely want to achieve a highly successful outcome to a problem of trust that has spread throughout the nation. Published January 20, 2015

Investing in America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Investing in a better America

Warren Buffett became very rich and very famous because he is a terrific investor. Not everyone agrees with his political stances, but his ability to achieve great return on investment is unquestioned. Published January 13, 2015

Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dispelling the myth of haves and have-nots in America

The Constitution of the United States of America was designed to preserve the freedom and rights of all citizens. Our Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal and that we have certain God-given rights. With documents like these, how have we arrived at the state of such discord between purported haves and have-nots in our society? Published January 6, 2015