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Deborah Simmons

Deborah Simmons

Award-winning opinion writer Deborah Simmons is a senior correspondent who reports on City Hall and writes about education, culture, sports and family-related topics. Mrs. Simmons has worked at several newspapers, and since joining The Washington Times in 1985, has served as editorial-page editor and features editor and on the metro desk. She has taught copy editing at the University of Maryland at College Park.

An occasional panelist on Roland Martin's “Washington Watch” and Denise Rolark Barnes' “Let's Talk” weekly news analysis cable-TV programs, Mrs. Simmons has also appeared on BET's “Lead Story,” “Real Time with Bill Maher” and Mr. Maher's “Politically Incorrect,” “America's Black Forum,” Fox News' “The O'Reilly Factor,” “The Right Side with Armstrong Williams,” C-SPAN's “Washington Journal,” and “This is America with Dennis Wholey.” She also has been a guest radio commentator on NPR, WAMU, WMAL and WOL.

Mrs. Simmons attended the University of the District of Columbia and Trinity College. She and her husband, who live in Washington, have four children and two grandchildren. Contact Mrs. Simmons at dsimmons@washingtontimes.com.

 

Articles by Deborah Simmons

Illegal immigrants find some big-city enablers

Dream on veterans, you starving poor, all you granddads struggling to raise your children's children. Your mayor wants to spend your hard-earned money to aid illegal immigrants and shield ne'er-do-wells. Published February 15, 2017

Deborah Simmons

Fifty shades of education reform

There should be no doubt where the Trump administration stands on education reform. The president would not have risked nominating a non-politician to run point on education policy if he doesn't plan or want to change policies from the inside. Published February 9, 2017

Appearing on a New York newsstand are Ebony magazine, left, featuring former President Barack Obama, and President Donald Trump on the cover of Golf Digest, Jan. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

The Donald Trump bathrobe thing

Does President Trump wear a bathrobe in the White House? Does he even own a bathrobe? Do you even care? Should you care? Why ask? Published February 7, 2017

A sign posted at Savoy Elementary School warns parents about pest problems, but the school remains open. (Deborah Simmons/The Washington Times)

D.C.'s pest control problem

D.C. has a pest control problem, and here's a solution: Trayon White might be tempted. He might be tempted to let his senior lawmaking colleagues take the lead role in what should be a citywide effort to ensure that school facilities get the all-clear sign on rodents, bed bugs, asbestos, lead-laced water, lead-based paint and other hazards. Published February 6, 2017

Kiley Hayden and K-9 Bbrooke, with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, keep watch outside the George R. Brown Convention Center, site of the media center and NFL Experience for the NFL Super Bowl 51 football game Friday, Feb. 3, 2017, in Houston. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Super Bowl safety and security

Cathy Lanier won't be calling the game plays at Super Bowl LI in Houston on Sunday. As the NFL's senior VP of of security, her game book is pat, for the most part. Published February 3, 2017

Alfred Kiger Savoy Elementary School says it is dealing with a pest infestation. (Deborah Simmons/The Washington Times)

Health emergency at D.C. school with infestation of rodents, bedbugs

A rodent problem might be understood, since Alfred Kiger Savoy Elementary School in the District sits hard by the Anacostia River. Bedbugs, not so much. What's truly troublesome is that school officials were aware of the infestation last year, which means they had the whole Christmas break to clear out classrooms, treat the problem, and return or buy classroom materials. Published February 1, 2017

School reform fallacies unplugged

A Democrat whose political brethren initially cried foul when parents wanted to establish school choice is (hopefully) turning a corner. And a Republican governor, who stomped his Democratic competition in a historically blue state, is making inroads on school choice. The national level is a bit more onerous. Published January 30, 2017

Dibs on Trump's infrastructure bottom line

Can you smell it? Can you smell the change in the air? Congressional Democrats are pushing a "comprehensive" infrastructure plan to rebuild America, and Republicans are proposing to right-size America and fashion their own infrastructure package. At some point the two sides shall meet. A trillion dollars here, a trillion there. Published January 26, 2017

Questioning Betsy DeVos on education: What's next?

Education Secretary-nominee Betsy DeVos is scheduled to be grilled Tuesday by senators as part of the advise and consent process. Let's hope members of the exclusive club ask the all-revealing question: What's next? Published January 16, 2017

FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2016 file photo, Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos speaks in Grand Rapids, Mich. Propelled by populist energy, President-elect Donald Trumps candidacy broke long-standing conventions and his incoming Cabinet embodies a sharp turn from the outgoing Obama administration.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

The battle for education reform, Round 1

The first round of the battle for education reform begins Jan. 17, when Betsy DeVos is slated to give her Senate testimony to become secretary of the Department of Education. Published January 12, 2017

Expecting a baby in 2017? Congratulations! Now beef up your savings account. The Agriculture Department says the estimated cost of raising a child from birth through age 17 is $233,610, or as much as almost $14,000 annually. (Associated Press/File)

Cost of raising a child rises to $233,610

The cost of raising a child born in 2015 to 18 years old is ... drum roll, please ...$233,610. The economic angst, though, may continue. Published January 11, 2017

D.C. fails to secure personal information

Russian hackers and other identity theft trolls needn't cramp their fingers trying to get sensitive personal identifiers of D.C. residents. Published January 9, 2017

Message to the Congressional Black Caucus

"I am true to my own race. I wish to see all done that can be done for their encouragement, to assist them in acquiring property, in becoming intelligent, enlightened, useful, valuable citizens." — Sen. Hiram Revels, the first black to serve in Congress Published January 5, 2017

RFK Stadium (The Washington Times/File)

Washington Redskins need their D.C. mojo back

The 'Skins left their mojo in RFK Stadium in Washington 20 years ago. The coaches haven't a clue as to how to get it back. Dan Snyder knows, and a few federal and D.C. authorities probably do, too. On Jan. 5, others get to open up. Published January 2, 2017