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Ed Feulner

Ed Feulner

Articles by Ed Feulner

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt attends a Cabinet meeting with President Donald Trump, Monday, June 12, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The bureaucrat behind the curtain

"Pay no attention to that man behind that curtain!" The Wizard of Oz had a good reason for trying to distract Dorothy when his true identity was revealed in the 1939 classic film. The last thing he wanted was for her to figure how things really operated. Published June 12, 2017

In this March 22, 2017 photo, soldiers with the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division clear a corner during a live fire training exercise on March 22 on Fort Bragg, N.C. The training was in preparation for a coming deployment to Afghanistan. (Shane Dunlap /The Fayetteville Observer via AP) **FILE**

Giving terrorists no quarter

Chances are, you heard plenty about the latest terrorist attacks in Britain. But the chances that you heard about the most recent attack in Afghanistan -- in which a suicide truck bomber set off his deadly payload in rush-hour traffic near the German embassy in Kabul -- are much lower. Why? Published June 5, 2017

In this Monday, May 22, 2017, photo, a woman laborer pacifies her child while cleaning a manhole on a sidewalk in Mumbai, India. Some 800 million people in the country live in poverty and many of them migrate to big cities in search of a livelihood. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool, File)

Searching for self-reliance

When conservatives call for Congress to cut federal spending and shrink the size of government, they're often portrayed as heartless. Published May 29, 2017

In this April 28, 2017 photo, Aimee Gomez, a recruiter for "maquiladora" assembly plants in Reynosa, Mexico helps Juan Luis Alvarado de la Rosa fill out a job application in an industrial park, across the border from McAllen, Texas. President Donald Trump has said NAFTA was "a catastrophic trade deal for the United States," but the reality is far more complicated, especially at the border where communities are enmeshed in a shared economy. (AP Photo/Christopher Sherman)

Taming the budget tiger

We're used to hearing politicians vow to cut spending. We're also used to them not following through. Published May 22, 2017

Illustration on cutting loose from the Paris climate agreement by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Deep-sixing the Paris Agreement

You wouldn't think Al Gore and Donald Trump would have much to talk about, given their political divisions. Yet that's exactly why the former vice president recently got in touch with President Trump: to urge him not to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Published May 15, 2017

Illustration on the prohibitive costs of higher education by Donna grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Better choices in higher education

Does anyone out there think higher education doesn't cost enough? Or that there are plenty of ideological points of view for students to choose from? Published May 8, 2017

Reducing the regulatory burden

In his April 29 speech marking his first 100 days in office, President Trump touched on the subject of regulations only briefly. Indeed, it took up all of one sentence. Published May 1, 2017

President Donald Trump walks past China's Ambassador to the United Nations Liu Jieyi, right, and National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster as he arrives for a working lunch with ambassadors of countries on the United Nations Security Council, Monday, April 24, 2017, in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Making government perform for Americans

Throughout the presidential campaign, Trump supporters were asked what drew them to their preferred candidate. Time and again, they pointed to his "outsider" status. Fed up with conventional politicians, they decided to take a chance on someone different -- someone likely to shake things up. Published April 24, 2017

Dressed as the "Real Chicken Don" Shawn Frye joins others in calling for President Donald Trump to release his tax returns, Wednesday, April 12, 2017, at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. Tax March Sacramento activists are planning to join others in a protest on Tax Day, April 15  calling on the the president to release his tax returns. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

The most taxing time of the year

How does tax season make you feel? Angry? Tired? Probably both, but there's a good chance you also felt a bit confused while preparing your returns. Published April 17, 2017

Migrants watch French officials tour  a makeshift camp set outside Calais, France, Tuesday Feb. 23, 2016. People fleeing conflict and poverty in Africa, the Mideast and Asia are facing an evening deadline to move out of the camp in the French port of Calais that has become a flashpoint in Europe's migrant crisis. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

No friend of the poor

When you're a conservative, you have to develop a thick skin. You get used to hearing how heartless you are. How devoid of compassion. Published April 10, 2017

The Senate side of the Capitol is seen in Washington, early Monday, April 3, 2017, as the Republican-led Senate Judiciary Committee meets to advance the nomination of President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch to fill the vacancy left by the late Antonin Scalia. A weeklong partisan showdown is expected as Democrats are steadily amassing the votes to block Judge Gorsuch and force Republicans to unilaterally change long-standing rules to confirm him. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Reining the big-government stampede

Most Americans don't expect the federal government to stay out of their lives altogether. What they expect is minimal involvement: Let Washington be the last resort, the one Americans turn to only when they truly can't devise any alternative. Published April 3, 2017

FILE - In this March 16, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump sits with House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. on Capitol Hill in Washington. Congressional Republicans on Monday, March 27, 2017, pointed fingers and assigned blame after their epic failure on health care and a weekend digesting the outcome.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The right cure for Obamacare

"This is not the end of the debate." Rep. Mark Meadows said that on ABC's "This Week" regarding the House leadership's failed health care bill, and he's exactly right. Published March 27, 2017

File - This Monday, Dec. 21, 2015 file photograph provided by the Israeli Ministry of Defense shows a launch of David's Sling missile defense system. A senior Israeli air force official says a joint U.S.-Israeli missile interceptor will be operational soon, completing the country's multi-layer defense system. He said Monday that David's Sling, meant to counter medium-range missiles possessed by Iranian-backed Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, will be operational in early April. (Ministry of Defense via AP, File)

The Strategic Defense Initiative at 34

When a politician promises something that "holds the promise of changing the course of human history," we naturally assume it's typical overstatement. But when President Ronald Reagan said that on March 23, 1983, in reference to his Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), he was exactly right. Published March 20, 2017

'Disunited we stumble'

President Trump's executive order on immigration has more than its fair share of critics. Among them, apparently, is someone at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The leaked report indicating that the children of immigrants raised in America radicalize at a higher rate than their parents do was plainly meant to undercut the president's order. Published March 13, 2017

The Rev. Jesse Jackson prepares to speak on the Edmund Pettus Bridge during the annual re-enactment of a key event in the civil rights movement in Selma, Ala., Sunday, March 5, 2017. Sunday marked the 52nd anniversary of the march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge over the Alabama River in Selma. On March 7, 1965, African-Americans seeking voting rights launched a march across the bridge en route to Montgomery but were attacked by police. That violent episode became known as "Bloody Sunday." (Albert Cesare/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP)

Eradicating election fraud

How people feel about voter fraud often breaks down along partisan lines. Most conservatives feel that it's a serious problem, while liberals tend to scoff. They either claim that it doesn't happen, or that it doesn't happen enough to make a real difference. Published March 6, 2017

A New Jersey State Police cruiser leaves Trump National Golf Club, Friday, Nov. 18, 2016, in Bedminster, N.J. President-elect Donald Trump is expected to arrive at the golf club on Friday. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Criminal civil forfeiture

Living in a free society brings benefits, but also responsibilities. One of the most important is keeping an eye on government. You never know when lawmakers will try to do something bad — or something that seems good initially, then goes spectacularly wrong. Published February 27, 2017

Some critics thought President Trump wouldn't last long in office, but as of Tuesday, he is not the president with the shortest term in office, according to historical records. (Associated Press)

America's declining economic freedom

Its official title is "2017 Index of Economic Freedom." But you could also call it "President Obama's Report Card." Published February 20, 2017

In this Jan. 20, 2017 photo, a worker packs rose buds to be shipped to the United States ahead of Valentine's Day, at the Ayura flower company in Tocancipa, north of Bogota, Colombia. The country's flower industry took off in the early 1990s when the U.S. Congress passed a law eliminating tariffs on goods from Andean drug-producing nations in a bid to encourage legal exports instead. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

Purging the marriage penalty

A Valentine's Day present from the federal government? It could happen. No, I'm not talking about flowers or candy. I'm talking about getting rid of the "marriage penalty" that's built into one of our biggest welfare programs. Published February 13, 2017

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2017 file picture President of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi , is on his way to a news conference after a meeting of the governing council in Frankfurt, Germany.   The head of the European Central Bank says  Monday Feb. 6, 2017 that its monetary stimulus efforts are still very much needed to support the continent's economic recovery  despite the recent spike in inflation in the countries that use the euro currency. (AP Photo/Michael Probst,file)

Overregulation drags down business

"If I could paraphrase a well-known statement by Will Rogers that he never met a man he didn't like," President Reagan once quipped, "I'm afraid we have some people around here who never met a tax they didn't like." Published February 6, 2017

Stockton University biology students, from left, Francisca Ekekwe, Valkyrie Falciani and Danielle Ertz work with spores in sterilized tubes that will be studied for agriculture in low gravity at the International Space Station, in Galloway, N.J., Monday Jan. 30 2017. Their experiments using spores were chosen by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) to go to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of Mission 11 of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP). (Ben Fogletto/The Press of Atlantic City via AP)

Choosing education that works

Amid the negativity we see online, in print and on the air, something good has been happening in communities all across the nation recently, as parents, teachers and students staged events to mark this year's National School Choice Week. Published January 30, 2017