Topic - Abu Anas Al-Libi

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  • Abu Anas al-Libi

    Al-Libi's capture revives debate over trying terrorist suspects

    The national debate over how to treat suspected terrorists seized overseas has a new poster child: a 49-year old Libyan extremist charged as one of the planners in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa.

  • Al-Libi

    Al Qaeda suspect's capture revives debate over trying terrorist suspects

    The national debate over how to treat suspected terrorists seized overseas has a new poster child: a 49-year old Libyan extremist charged as one of the planners in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa.

  • FILE - This file image from the FBI website shows Abu Anas al-Libi, an al-Qaeda leader connected to the 1998 embassy bombings in eastern Africa and wanted by the United States for more than a decade. Al-Libi was captured in a raid Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, and is being held aboard the USS San Antonio, a warship mainly used to transport troops. Instead of sending suspected terrorists to Guantanamo Bay or secret CIA "black" sites for interrogation, the Obama administration is questioning them aboard U.S. naval vessels. (AP Photo/FBI, File)

    Drone strikes plummet as U.S. seeks more human intelligence

    The number of drone strikes approved by the Obama administration on suspected terrorists has fallen dramatically this year, as the war with al Qaeda increasingly shifts to Africa and U.S. intelligence craves more captures and interrogations of high-value targets.

  • President Barack Obama speaks about the budget and the partial government shutdown, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013, in the Brady Press Room of the White House in Washington. Obama is making plans to talk with Republican lawmakers at the White House in the coming days as pressure builds on both sides to resolve a deadlock over the federal debt limit and the shutdown. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    NAPOLITANO: The Obama administration has gone rogue

    Last weekend, a team of Navy SEALs kidnapped a Libyan, Abu Anas al-Libi, off of a public street in Tripoli. The Navy men did not have a warrant for his arrest, did not have the permission of the local authorities or the Libyan government to carry out this kidnapping, and were unlawfully present bearing arms in public in Libya.

  • FILE - This file image from the FBI website shows Abu Anas al-Libi, an al-Qaeda leader connected to the 1998 embassy bombings in eastern Africa and wanted by the United States for more than a decade. Al-Libi was captured in a raid Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, and is being held aboard the USS San Antonio, a warship mainly used to transport troops. Instead of sending suspected terrorists to Guantanamo Bay or secret CIA "black" sites for interrogation, the Obama administration is questioning them aboard U.S. naval vessels. (AP Photo/FBI, File)

    GOP lawmakers want captured Libyan in Guantanamo

    Three influential Republican lawmakers slammed the Obama administration's handling of Abu Anas al-Libi, the suspected high-level al Qaeda operative captured by American commandos in Tripoli on Saturday, saying the terrorist now being held and interrogated on a U.S. Navy ship on the Mediterranean Sea should be quickly transferred to the detainee prison at Guantanamo Bay.

  • Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina wants Abu Anas al-Libi taken to the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as an enemy combatant and interrogated. (Associated Press)

    Sen. Graham wants al-Libi sent quickly to Guantanamo for interrogation

    Three influential Republican lawmakers slammed the Obama administration's handling of Abu Anas al-Libi, the suspected high-level al Qaeda operative captured by American commandos in Tripoli, Libya, on Saturday, saying the terrorist now being held and interrogated on a U.S. Navy ship on the Mediterranean Sea should be transferred quickly to the detainee prison at Guantanamo Bay.

  • Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, whose alias is Abu Anas al-Libi, was seized by U.S. forces in Tripoli, Libya, on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, in connection with the 1998 embassy bombings in eastern Africa. (AP Photo/FBI)

    Miranda rights waived for suspected al Qaeda operative Abu Anas al-Libi

    U.S. authorities will interrogate suspected al Qaeda operative Abu Anas al-Libi aboard an American warship without reading him his rights, officials said Monday.

  • Partisan critics say President Obama's continuing embrace of rendition, along with his inability to shutter Guantanamo, are proof that his assertions as a candidate have collided with the realities of being the commander in chief, most recently the weekend raids in Somalia and Libya. (Associated Press)

    White House embrace of Bush-era anti-terrorism policies continues

    President Obama's decision this weekend to authorize capture and rendition of a top terror target in Libya has reignited questions about his use of Bush-era tools and tactics — and has given more ammunition to critics who say it's time he makes a clean break from policies of the past.

  • Dozens of supporters of the militant group Ansar al-Shariah burn an American flag and shout anti-American slogans denouncing the U.S. violation of Libya's sovereignty in the abduction of Abu Anas al-Libi, in the center of Benghazi, Libya, on Oct. 7, 2013. Two days earlier, the U.S. Army's Delta Force captured Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, known by his alias Anas al-Libi, an al Qaeda leader linked to the 1998 American Embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania. (Associated Press/Mohammed el-Shaiky)

    Libya demanding answers about U.S. raid

    Libya's interim government is seeking answers after U.S. special forces over the weekend captured al Qaeda operative Abu Anas al-Libi in Tripoli, calling the operation a "kidnapping of a Libyan citizen."

  • **FILE** Armed al-Shabab fighters just outside Mogadishu prepare to travel into the city in pickup trucks on Dec. 8, 2008, after vowing there would be new waves of attacks against Ethiopian troops. (Associated Press/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

    White House confirms Obama ordered African raids

    President Obama ordered the weekend raids that captured a top al Qaeda operative in Libya and failed to capture a senior leader of the al-Shabab terrorist network in Somalia, the White House said Monday.

  • U.S. Navy SEALs in action. (U.S. Navy photo)

    SEALs take over for drones as U.S. ups the stakes in fight against Al Qaeda

    Clandestine U.S. military raids on terrorist targets in North Africa suggest the Obama administration is eager to send a message to an emerging generation of al Qaeda fighters: It does not matter where on the globe you are hiding, the U.S. is tracking you and willing to exert stealth military muscle — not just drones — to take you down.

  • Men carrying automatic weapons and carrying bags are seen in the storeroom of the Nakumatt shop during the four-day siege at the Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, which killed more than 60 people last month. A Kenyan military spokesman confirmed the names of four attackers as Abu Baara al-Sudani (left), Omar Nabhan (unseen), Khattab al-Kene (unseen) and Umayr (right). (AP Photo/Kenyan Defence forces via Citizen TV)

    Libya bristles at U.S. raid that captured al Qaeda militant

    A suspected Libyan al Qaeda figure nabbed by U.S. special forces in a dramatic operation in Tripoli had been living freely in his homeland for the past two years after a trajectory that took him to Sudan, Afghanistan and Iran, where he had been detained for years, his family said Sunday. The Libyan government bristled at the raid, asking Washington to explain the "kidnapping."

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