Topic - Liu Xiaobo

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • Secret video of China Nobel's wife screens in NYC

    Rare video showing what life is like under house arrest for Liu Xia, the Chinese artist and poet married to jailed Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo, was screened for the first time Tuesday in New York City to an audience of Chinese and American writers and activists who have pushed for her release.

  • Liu Xia, wife of 2010 Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, stands Dec. 6, 2012, in her Beijing home where she has been held under house arrest for more than two years. Liu trembled uncontrollably and cried as she described how her confinement under house arrest has been absurd and emotionally draining in the two years since her jailed activist husband was named a Nobel Peace laureate. (Associated Press)

    Detained China Nobel wife speaks out

    Stunned that reporters were able to visit her, Liu Xia trembled uncontrollably and cried Thursday as she described how absurd and emotionally draining her confinement under house arrest has been in the two years since her jailed activist husband, Liu Xiaobo, was named a Nobel Peace laureate.

  • Mo Yan of China, the 2012 Nobel Literature Prize laureate speaks Dec. 6, 2012, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy in Stockholm. The official prize giving ceremony takes place in Stockholm on Dec. 10. (Associated Press)

    Chinese Nobel literature winner: censorship a must

    This year's Nobel Prize in literature winner, Mo Yan, who has been criticized for his membership in China's Communist Party and reluctance to speak out against the country's government, defended censorship Thursday as something as necessary as airport security checks.

  • Nobel literature winner says censorship necessary

    This year's Nobel literature winner Mo Yan, who has been criticized for his cozy relationship with China's Communist Party, defended censorship Thursday as something as necessary as airport security checks.

  • Chinese Nobel literature winner: censorship a must

    This year's Nobel Prize in literature winner, Mo Yan, who has been criticized for his membership in China's Communist Party and reluctance to speak out against the country's government, defended censorship Thursday as something as necessary as airport security checks.

  • Dissident to start website for Nobel laureate

    Chinese dissident and author Yu Jie said late Wednesday he was granted asylum in the United States last week and plans to start a website in support of his friend, imprisoned Chinese Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo.

  • The Washington Times

    KINE: No Valentine's love for China's illegitimate leaders

    The Feb. 14 visit to Washington by Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping gives the United States a well-timed opportunity to lay its cards on the table for China's presumptive next president and Communist Party chairman.

  • Censored Chinese artist's photos coming to NYC

    Liu Xia is a forbidden artist whose work is censored in her native China. The photographer, who is under house arrest, uses life-like dolls as metaphors for the pain and suffering of the Chinese people.

  • Chinese writer Yu Jie (AP photo)

    Chinese dissident describes torture

    Chinese dissident Yu Jie said Wednesday that security officials in Beijing tortured him to the brink of death because of his political opinions and friendship with another prominent pro-democracy advocate, Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo.

  • Illustration: Liu Xiaobo

    SMITH: China's human rights regression

    Saturday marked both International Human Rights Day and one year since Chinese intellectual Liu Xiaobo received the Nobel Peace Prize for his work promoting human rights and democracy in China. Human Rights Day, which commemorates the 1948 adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), is an occasion to affirm our commitment to advancing the values of human rights common to us all. Nobel Laureate Liu's continued imprisonment in a Chinese jail is a stark reminder of the urgency of this task.

  • Liu Xia, wife of imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, is cut off from the outside world by the Chinese government. (Kyodo News via Associated Press)

    Jailed Nobel winner's wife silenced by government-ordered isolation

    In a quiet, leafy Beijing neighborhood, a woman has been living in enforced isolation in her book-lined, fifth-floor apartment.

  • Briefly

    Carlos Pascual, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico who resigned last weekend in a diplomatic scandal that outraged officials south of the border, remains at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, where he is helping with a transition to a new chief of mission.

  • A noble man wins the Nobel prize

    Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo's Nobel Peace Prize victory this year begs an important question: What is Mr. Liu dissenting from?

  • Nobel Commitee chairman Thorbjorn Jagland, left, and committee member Kaci Kullman Five place the Nobel Peace Prize medal and diploma on an empty chair representing Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo during a ceremony honoring Liu at city hall in Oslo, Norway, on Friday Dec. 10, 2010. Liu, a democracy activist, is serving an 11-year prison sentence in China on subversion charges brought after he co-authored a bold call for sweeping changes to Beijing's one-party communist political system. (AP Photo/John McConnico)

    Nobel peace ceremony for Liu goes ahead with empty chair

    Clapping solemnly, dignitaries in Norway celebrated this year's Nobel Peace Prize winner, imprisoned Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, with an empty chair.

  • A man shows the first Confucius Peace Prize awarded to former Taiwanese Vice President Lien Chan during a press conference in Beijing, China, Thursday, Dec. 9, 2010. A Chinese group awarded its own version of a peace prize Thursday, a move apparently intended to counter the Nobel committee's decision to honor imprisoned dissident Liu Xiaobo. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

    Anti-Nobel plan energizes West

    China's campaign to vilify this year's recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and sabotage the award ceremony showed signs of backfiring Thursday, as criticism of Beijing rose and the imprisoned Chinese dissident seemed to be turning into a celebrity.

More Stories →

Quotations
Happening Now